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Aniagolu, Charles:
Osibisa.
Living in the State of Happy Vibes and Criss Cross Rhythms.

Victoria, B.C.: Trafford Publishing, 2004. 208 p.
Contents

Bame, Kwabena N.:
Come to Laugh. A Study of African Traditional Theatre in Ghana.
Legon: Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, 1981. 102 p.
Second revised edition
Come to Laugh. African Traditional Theatre in Ghana.
New York, N.Y.: Lilian Barber Press, 1985. 190 p.
Contents

Cole, Catherine M.:
Ghana’s Concert Party Theatre.
Bloomigton, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2001. 196 p.
Contents

Collins, [Edmund] John:
E.T. Mensah. The King of Highlife.
London: Off the Record Press, 1986. 51 p.
Contents
Second edition
Accra: Anamsesem Publications,1996. 60 p.
Contents

Collins, [Edmund] John & Flemming Harrev:
King of the Black Beat.
The Story of King Bruce and the Black Beats, Highlife Dance-Band of Ghana.

Unpublished manuscript, 1991. 96 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 9.35 MB

Collins, [Edmund] John
‘Classic’ Highlife Tunes:
Scores of Almost One Hundred Dance Band and Guitar Band Highlife Songs.

Accra: Public Affairs Section of the US Embassy, 2005.

Feld, Steven:
Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra. Five Musical Years in Ghana.
Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2012. 311 p.
Contents

KPMG:
A Comprehensive Study of the Music Sector in Ghana. Final Report.
Accra: KPMG Ghana, 2014. 290 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 5.98 MB

Matczynski, William:
Highlife and its Roots: Negotiating the Social, Cultural,
and Musical Continuities Between Popular and Traditional Music in Ghana.

Macalester College (Saint Paul, Minn,), Music Honors Projects. Paper 10, 2011. 67 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar  1.41 MB

Mazzoleni, Florent; Kwesi Owusu & Markus Coester:
Ghana Highlife Music.
Bègles: Le Castor Astral, 2012. 175 p.
Table des matières / Contents

Nimo, Ko:
Ashanti Ballads. In Asante-Twi. Set in English verse by J. L. Latham.
Kumasi: Published by the authors, 1969. 22 p.
Reprint
Glasgow: Latham Services, 1988. 22 p.
Contents

Nyame, E. K.:
E. K.’s Band Song Book.
Accra: H. Teymani, 1955. 36 p.

Osumare, Halifu:
The Hiplife in Ghana. West African Indigenization of Hip-Hop.
New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., 2012. xii & 219 p.
Contents

Plageman, Nate:
Highlife Saturday Night. Popular Music and Social Change in Urban Ghana.
Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2013. 318 p.
Contents

Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
Konkoma. Eine Musikform der Fanti-Jungfischer in
den 40er und 50er Jahren (Ghana, Westafrika).
Mainzer Ethnologische Arbeiten, Band 8.
Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1989. 180 p.
Inhalt

Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
Highlife. Entwicklung und Stilformen ghanaischer Gegenwartsmusik.
Mainzer Beiträge zur Afrika-Forschung, Band 3. Münster: Litt Verlag, 1996. 522 p.
Inhalt

Shipley, Jesse Weaver:
Living the Hiplife. Celebrity and Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Popular Music.
Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2013. 329 p.
Contents

Sutherland, Efua:
The Original Bob. The Story of Bob Johnson Ghana’s Ace Comedian.
Accra: Anowou Educational Publications, 1970. 25 p.
Contents

Warren, Guy:
I Have a Story to Tell…
Accra: Guinea Press, 1962. 205 p.

Younge, Pascal Yao:
Music and Dance Traditions of Ghana. History, Performance and Teaching.
Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company Inc., Publishers, 2011. 448 p.
Contents

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  • Aniagolu, Charles:
    Osibisa. Living in the State of Happy Vibes and Criss Cross Rhythms.
    Victoria, B.C.: Trafford Publishing, 2004. 208 p.
    ISBN 1-4120-2106-5

    CONTENTS

    I. Foreword 6

    II. Critical acclaim for Osibisa 9

    III. Prologue 14

    IV. Early Days
    Asante roots 39
    Highlife 46
    Mr Duker and The Comets 50
    Cool Brittannia 55
    Roots of Afro Rock 60
    Ginger Baker and the surge of excitement 64
    Underground alternative 72

    V. Afro Rock Years
    Star attraction 85
    From The Rolling Stones to the Royal Ballet 91
    Empire of the sun 101
    Soul Food And The Jacksons 104
    Stir It up 109
    Something is seriously rotten … 113
    The Lagos jinx 131
    Flight of the Elephant 139
    Rolf Harris and the didgeridoo 149
    Ragtime 154
    Mighty men of Osibisa157
    In brotherhood we stand 161
    Black magic gremlins 168
    Fire in the rain177
    Land of the prophet 180
    Record sales don’t lie 185
    Sunset 188
    Osibisa forever 192

    VI. Epilogue 195
    VII. Sources 201
    VIII.Osibiography 203
    IX.Osibifile 206

  • Bame, Kwabena N.:
    Come to Laugh. African Traditional Theatre in Ghana.
    New York, N.Y.: Lilian Barber Press, 1985. 190 p. (Second revised edition)
    ISBN 0-936508-08-6

    CONTENTS

    PART 1

    Preface  5

    The History of Concert Parties 8
    The Actors, the Comedians 30
    Humor in the Plays 36
    Music and Dancing 40
    Presentation 50
    Thematic Sources 57
    Comedians and Their Audience 63
    Audience Response 68
    The Social Functions of the Plays 74

    Appendix 83
    Notes and References 97

    PART 2

    Note on the Transcripts of Two Concert Parties 101
    “The Jealous Rival” 103
    “The Ungrateful Husband” 129

  • Cole, Catherine M.:
    Ghana’s Concert Party Theatre.
    Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2001. 196 p.
    ISBN 0-253-33845-X

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Note on Orthography xi

    1
    Introduction 1

    2
    Reading Blackface in West Africa
    Wonders taken for signs 17

    3
    “The Rowdy Lot Created the Usual Disturbance”
    Concerts and emergent publics, 1895-1927 53

    4
    “Ohia Ma Adwennwen,” or “Use Your Gumption!”
    The pragmatics of performance, 1927-1945 78

    5
    Improvising Popular Traveling Theatre
    The poetics of invention 104

    6
    “This Is Actually a Good Interpretation of Modern Civilization”
    Staging the social imaginary, 1946-1966 133

    Epilogue 159

    Notes 163
    Bibliography 173
    Index 187

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    E.T. Mensah. The King of Highlife.
    London: Off the Record Press, 1986. 51 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Introduction 1

    Chapter 1 Early Days 9
    Chapter 2 The War and The Early Tempos 13
    Chapter 3 The King of Highlife 18
    Chapter 4 Satchmo 23
    Chapter 5 Independence 27
    Chapter 6 Travels in West Africa 29
    Chapter 7 The Trip to England 37
    Chapter 8 Problems of a Band Leader 42

    Discography 49

  •  

    Collins, [Edmund] John:
    E.T. Mensah. The King of Highlife.
    Accra: Anamsesem Publications, 1996. 60 p. (Second edition)
    ISBN 9988-552-17-3

    CONTENTS

    Foreword  vii

    Chapter 1 Early Days 1
    Chapter 2 The War and The Early Tempos 5
    Chapter 3 The King of Highlife 11
    Chapter 4 Satchmo 17
    Chapter 5 Independence 21
    Chapter 6 Travels in West Africa 25
    Chapter 7 The Thp to England 35
    Chapter 8 Problems of a Band Leader 41

    Discography 49

    Overview of Highlife 53

  • Collins, [Edmund] John & Flemming Harrev:
    King of the Black Beat.
    The Story of King Bruce and the Black Beats, Highlife Dance-Band of Ghana.
    Unpublished manuscript, 1991. 96 p. [blank pages omitted]
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Preface Flemming Harrev

    Chapter 1 John Collins
    An Introduction to the Early History of West African Highlife Music
    Palm-Wine and Guitar-Band Highlife       
    Brass-Band, Adaha and Konkomba Highlife        
    Dance-Band Highlife

    Chapter 2 Early Days
    Early Musical Influences
    Local Music in the Area
    Achimota College

    Chapter 3 Learning the Trompet
    Taking Up the Trompet
    Finding a Place to Rehearse
    The London Jazz Scene

    Chapter 4 Back in Accra with the Accra Orchestra
    Stock Arrangements and Highlifes
    Part-Timers
    Falling between Two Stools
    Leaving the Accra Orchestra

    Chapter 5 First Generation Black Beats
    The Influence of Louis Jordan
    Those Days of Sharing
    Saka Acquaye Leaving
    Early Repertoire
    First Recordings

    Chapter 6 The Golden Age of the Black Beats
    Louis Armstrong and the Goatee Beard Look
    The Lead Singers

    Chapter 7 The Second Generation Black
    Beats and the ‘B.B.’ Bands
    Into the Limelight Again
    Foul Play
    Playing or Promotion?
    The Seven ‘B.B.’ Bands

    Chapter 8 Music Problems and Music Unions
    The Musicians Unions
    Royalties
    MUSIGA
    Spinners and Copyright Laws
    Music Pirates

    Chapter 9 Present and Future Plans
    Future of Live Bands
    The Pull of Music

    Chapter 10 Black Beats’ Songs – Comments and Translations

    Chapter 11 Flemming Harrev
     A Discography of the Black Beats

    Index
    Photos

  • Feld, Steven:
    Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra. Five Musical Years in Ghana.
    Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2012. 311 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8223-5162-7 

    CONTENTS

    OPUS xi

    FOUR-BAR INTRO
    “The Shape of Jazz to Come”  1

    VAMP IN, HEAD
    Acoustemology in Accra: On Jazz Cosmopolitanism 11

    FIRST CHORUS, WITH TRANSPOSITION
    Guy Warren / Ghanaba: From Afro-Jazz to Handel via Max Roach 51

    SECOND CHORUS, BLOW FREE
    Nii Noi Nortey: From Pan-Africanism to Afrifones via John Coltrane 87

    THIRD CHORUS, BACK INSIDE
    Nii Otoo Annan: From Toads to Polyrhythm via Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali 119

    FOURTH CHORUS, SHOUT TO THE GROOVE
    Por Por: From Honk Horns to Jazz Funerals via New Orleans 159

    HEAD AGAIN, VAMP OUT
    Beyond Diasporic Intimacy 199

    “DEDICATED TO YOU” 245
    HORN BACKGROUNDS, RIFFS UNDERNEATH 249
    THEMES, PLAYERS 299

  • KPMG:
    A Comprehensive Study of the Music Sector in Ghana. Final Report.
    Accra: KPMG Ghana, 2014. 290 p.

    CONTENTS

    1 Executive Summary 11
    1.1 Introduction 11
    1.2 Country Profile 11
    1.3 The Creative Industries in Ghana 11
    1.4 Music Sector Overview 12
    1.5 Market Characteristics 12
    1.6 Regional and Local Sector Dynamics 13
    1.7 Regulatory Framework 13
    1.8 Economic Value Analysis 13
    1.9 Social Contribution 15
    1.10 Industry Infrastructure 16
    1.11 International Dynamics 17
    1.12 Linkage with other Sectors 17
    1.13 SWOT Analysis 17
    1.14 Recommendations 18
    1.15 Conclusion 19

    2 Introduction 20
    2.1 Project Background 20
    2.2 Objectives 20
    2.3 Scope of Work 20
    2.4 Justification 21
    2.5 Methodology 22
       2.5.1 Sources of Data 22
       2.5.2 Sampling Techniques 24
    2.6 Limitations 24
    2.7 Conclusion 24

    3 Country Profile 26
    3.1 Introduction 26
    3.2 Political Environment 26
    3.3 Economic Environment 27
    3.4 Social Dynamics 29
    3.5 Technological Factors 31
    3.6 Country Outlook 31
    3.7 Conclusion 32

    4 The Creative Industry in Ghana 33
    4.1 Overview 33
    4.2 Characteristics of the Creative Industry in Ghana 34
    4.2.1 Overview 34
    4.3 Conclusion 36

    5 Music Sector Overview 37
    5.1 Historical Perspective 37
       5.1.1 Overview 37
       5.1.2 Music Genres 37
    5.2 Industry Oversight 42
    5.3 Professional Organizations 45
       5.3.1 Creators Associations 45
       5.3.2 Producers Associations 46
       5.3.3 Collective Management Organization (CMO) 47
    5.4 Current State of the Sector – Challenges and Opportunities 48
    5.5 Porter‘s Five Forces Model 48
    5.6 Conclusion 49

    6 Market Characteristics 51
    6.1 Overview of Music Value Chain 51
    6.1.1 Typical Music Value Chain around the World 51
    6.1.2 Music Value Chain in Ghana 52
    6.2 Volume of production by Type 75
    6.3 Conclusion 78

    7 Regional and Local Sector Dynamics 79
    7.1 Regional Features of the Sector 79
    7.2 Conclusion 93

    8 Regulatory Framework 94
    8.1 Review of Regulations 94
    8.2 Review of Policy Documents 97

    9 Economic Value Analysis 101
    9.1 Introduction 101
    9.2 Employment Characteristics 101
       9.2.1 Size of the Sector 101
       9.2.2 Characteristics of Employment 103
    9.3 Value of Sector (Revenue Sources and Estimation) 124
       9.3.1 Framework for Analysis 124
       9.3.2 Domestic Revenue Estimation 126
    9.4 Contribution to GDP 131
    9.4.1 Summary of GDP 131

    10 Social Characteristics & Contribution 132
    10.1 Social characteristics of the sector 132
    10.1.1 Creators 132
    10.1.2 Business Category 133
    10.2 Overview 141
    10.3 Sociological aspects of music 141
    10.4 Benefits of music 141
    10.5 Social groups and events 142
       10.5.1 Social circles in Ghana 142
       10.5.2 Choral groups 142
       10.5.3 Traditional/folkloric bands 145
       10.5.4 Public bands 148

    11 Industry Infrastructure 150
    11.1 Introduction 150
    11.2 Training Institutions 150
       11.2.1 Educational Institutions 150
       11.2.2 Capacity Building Institutions 153
    11.3 Manufacturers 155
       11.3.1 Local Instrument Manufacturers 155
       11.3.2 Audio/Visuals 158
    11.4 Digital Music Downloads 159
    11.5 Event organisers and Venues 160
       11.5.1 Data analysis – Event organisers 162
       11.5.2 Data analysis – Venue operators 163

    12 International Dynamics 166
    12.1 Ghanaian music abroad 166
       12.1.1 Live performances 166
       12.1.2 International awards 166
       12.1.3 Operational base of music distributors 167
    12.2 Exposure of tourists to Ghanaian music 167
    12.3 Volume of Exports 170

    13 Linkage with other Sectors 172
    13.1 Music as a subject – Musicology 172
    13.2 Music as an art – Applied Musicology 172
       13.2.1 Film 173
       13.2.2 Theatre art 173
       13.2.3 Fashion 174
       13.2.4 Medicine & therapy 175

    14 SWOT Analyses 177
    14.1 Introduction 177
    14.2 Strengths 178
    14.3 Weaknesses 178
    14.4 Opportunities 184
    14.5 Threats 184
    14.6 Conclusion 185

    15 Recommendations 186
    15.1 Observations and Recommendations 186

    16 Conclusion 191
    16.1 Objectives 191
    16.2 Methodology 191
    16.3 Findings 191
    16.4 Observations and Recommendations 192

    17 Appendices 193
    17.1 Appendix A – Details of Educational Institutions 193
    17.2 Appendix B – Questionnaires administered for the survey 198
    17.3 Appendix C – Names of some sensational Ghanaian music professionals,
            music archives and the impact of colonialism 274
    17.4 Appendix D – Ghanaian population according to age groups and regions 276
    17.5 Appendix E – Categories and sub-categories of the Music Industry 278
    17.6 Committee Members 288
    17.6.1 Oversight Committee Members 288
    17.6.2 Technical Committee Members 288

    18 Bibliography 290

  • Matczynski, William:
    Highlife and its Roots: Negotiating the Social, Cultural, and Musical Continuities Between Popular and Traditional Music in Ghana.
    Macalester College (Saint Paul, Minn,), Music Honors Projects. Paper 10, 2011. 67 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1

    Chapter Two
    Musical Continuities between Popular and Traditional Music 19

    Chapter Three
    Highlife Texts 32
    Anansesem, Storytelling and Guitar-Band Highlife

    Chapter Four
    Fusion Music and Experimentalism 46
    Traditional Music as Resource

    Conclusion 55

    Appendix
    Highlife Photographs 57

    Listening List 64
    Bibliography 65

  •  

    Mazzoleni, Florent; Kwesi Owusu & Markus Coester:
    Ghana Highlife Music.
    Bègles: Le Castor Astral, 2012. 175 p.
    ISBN 978-2-85920-908-7

    TABLE DES MATIÈRES / CONTENTS

    CLASSIC HIGHLIFE 50 8
    E .T. Mensah & His Tempos
    Stargazers
    Rhythm Aces
    Red Spots
    Delta Dandies
    Down Beats
    Alkot Dandles
    Black Beats
    Rakers
    Broadway Dance Band
    Modernaires
    Ambassador Dance Band
    Springbok Dance Band
    Comets Dance Band
    Casino Dance Band
    Casino Orchestra

    GOLDEN HIGHLIFE 60 46
    E.T. Mensah
    Louis Armstrong
    Jerry Hansen & Ramblers Dance Band
    E.K. Nyame
    King Oninya
    Ko Nimo
    The Comets
    CK Mann

    GUITAR HIGHLIFE  60/70 82
    Dr. Gyasi & His Noble Kings
    City Boys Band
    Cutlass Dance Band
    Alex Konadu
    African Brothers Band
    Yamoah’s Band
    TO Jazz
    Kaikaiku No 2 Band
    Okukuseku Band
    Prince Sparrows Band
    Opambuo Internationals
    Bob Akwaboah & His Supreme Internationals

    FUNKY HIGHLIFE 70 114
    Fela
    Faisal Helwani
    Hedzolleh
    Bunzu Soundz
    Osibisa
    Uhuru Dance Band
    Ogyatanaa Show Band
    Ebo Taylor
    Gyedu Blay Ambolley
    Pat Thomas
    Marijata
    Joe Mensah
    The Sweet Talks
    Vis A Vis
    De Frank
    B.B. Collins
    K. Frimpong
    Tony Sarfo
    Francis Kenya
    Manu Atakora & His Sound Engineers

  • Nimo, Ko:
    Ashanti Ballads. In Asante-Twi. Set in English verse by J. L. Latham.
    Kumasi: Published by the authors, 1969. 22 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Introduction 1

    Owuo ton Adee a To bi 2
    Death 3
    Sure wo yonko 4
    Beware of a Friend 5
    So dee wowo mu yie 6
    Accept your Lot 7
    Me sure wo gya mu fite 8
    Suspicion 9
    Ahantan nye10
    Pride has its Price 11
    Asamando Wonko 12
    Akyekyedee ne Adanko Annrikatuo 12
    The Kingdom of the Dead 13
    The Tortoise and the Hare 13
    Owusu se mamma 14
    The Driver’s Lament 15
    Obi Aware sem 16
    When Friends Interfere 17
    Nkrabea nni Kwatibea 18
    Fate is Just 19
    Asante Abakosem bi 20
    A History of Ashanti 21

  • Osumare, Halifu:
    The Hiplife in Ghana. West African Indigenization of Hip-Hop.
    New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., 2012. xii & 219 p.
    ISBN 978-1-349-43767-2 (softcover) 978-1-137-02164-9 (hardcover) 978-1-137-02165-6 (eBook)

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures ix
    Acknowledgments xi

    Introduction: “Every Hood Has Its Own Style” 1

    1.
    “Making An African Out of the Computer”:
    Globalization and Indigenization in Hiplife 29

    2.
    Empowering the Young: Hiplife’s Youth Agency 83

    3.
    “Society of the Spectacle”: Hiplife and Corporate Recolonialization 119

    4.
    “The Game”: Hiplife’s Counter-Hegemonic Discourse 159

    Notes 183
    Bibliography 203
    Index 213

  • Plageman, Nate:
    Highlife Saturday Night. Popular Music and Social Change in Urban Ghana.
    Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2013. 318 p.
    ISBN 978-0-253-00725-4

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Ethnomusicology multimedia series preface xiii

    Introduction: The Historical Importance of Urban Ghana’s
    Saturday Nights 1

    1.
    Popular Music, Political Authority, and Social Possibilities
    in the Southern Gold Coast, 1890-1940 31

    2.
    The Making of a Middle Class: Urban Social Clubs and the
    Evolution of Highlife Music, 1915-1940 67

    3.
    The Friction on the Floor: Negotiating Nightlife in
    Accra, 1940-1960 100

    4.
    “The Highlife Was Born in Ghana”: Politics, Culture,
    and the Making of a National Music, 1950-1965 147

    5.
    “We Were the Ones Who Composed the Songs”:
    The Promises and Pitfalls of Being a Bandsman, 1945-1970 183

    Epilogue 224

    Glossary 231
    Notes 233
    Discography 279
    Bibliography 289
    Index 311

  • Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
    Konkoma. Eine Musikform der Fanti-Jungfischer in
    den 40er und 50er Jahren (Ghana, Westafrika).
    Mainzer Ethnologische Arbeiten, Band 8. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1989. 180 p.
    ISBN 3-496-00992-6

    INHALT

    Vorwort  v
     
    1.Einleitung  1
    1.1 Erklärung des Konkoma-Begriffes 1
    1.2 Stammt der Begriff Konkoma von einer Muschel? 2
    1.3 Definition  4
     
    2.Musikalische und Wirtschaftliche Früherziehung 5
    2.1 Vorbemerkungen 5
    2.2 Afrikanische Skalensysteme und Konkoma-Lieder 5
    2.3 Erziehung der Jugend durch Singspiele 8
    2.4 Kinderlieder 9
    2.5 Musikalische Entwicklung der Mädchen 10
    2.6 Musik bei Mondschein 12
    2.7 Die musikalische Entwicklung der jungen Fischer 18
     
    3. Fischergemeinschaften 29
    3.1 Wirtschaftsaktivitäten 29
    3.2 Arbeitsteilung und Lieder bei der Arbeit 30
    3.3 Männer- und Frauenlieder – ein Vergleich 33
     
    4. Andere Musikalische Erfahrungen 37
    4.1 Reiseerfahrungen 37
    4.2 Fischer-Migration 39
    4.2.1 Canoe-men (Kanu-Männer) 41
    4.3 EinfluB des Marktgeschehens auf die Musik 43
    4.4 Spottlieder 48
    4.5 Spottlieder über Eliten 56
     
    5. Anfänge der Konkoma 58
    5.1 Vorbemerkungen 58
    5.2 Entstehungszeit 59
    5.3 Entstehungsort 60
    5.4 School drop-outs und Konkoma 61
    5.5 Merkmale der Konkoma-Musik 64
    5.6 Organisation der Konkoma 70
     
    6. Die Musikinstrumente der Konkoma 71
    6.1 Allgemeines 71
    6.2 Idiophone 72
    6.3 Membranophone 76
    6.4 Charakteristika der Konkoma-Trommeln 78
    6.5 Zusammenfassung der Musikinstrumente 81
     
    7. Die Konkoma-Musik in Beispielen 83
    7.1 Konkoma-Musikformen 83
    7.2 Konkoma-Rhythmen 92
    7.3 Die Aufführung von Konkoma-Musik 105
    7.3.1 See there!  106
    7.3.2 Tanzen zur Konkoma-Musik 108
    7.4 Exkurs 110

    8. Verbreitung von Konkoma in Ghana 113
    8.1 Konkoma und Rock’ n’Roll-Musik: Ein Vergleich 113
    8.2 Heimat der Konkoma-Musik: Die Zentralregion 114
    8.3 Verbreitung im Binnenland 115
    8.4 Wettbewerb 117
    8.4.1 Absatzpolitische Gründe des Wettbewerbs 117
    8.4.2 Kriegspropaganda 118
    8.5 Konkoma nach dem Kriegsende 120
    8.5.1 Konkoma und die “school leavers”  24
    8.5.2 Konkoma als Broterwerb 124
    8.5.3 Westliche Elemente in der Konkoma-Musik 125
    8.6 Konkoma und die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung 126
    8.6.1 Die neue soziale Wirklichkeit und Auflösung
    der Konkoma 128
     
    9. Was Kam nach Konkoma? 130

    Zusammenfassung 132

    Anmerkungen 135

    Anhang 155
    Karte 1 Übersichtskarte Ghana 155
    Karte 2 Minengebiete Ghanas 156
    Karte 3 Regionen Ghanas 157
    Karte 4 Strassennetz von Ghana 1960 158
    Tabelle Fischergemeinden der Goldküste 159
    Instrumente der Konkoma-Musik 160
    Beispiel filr die Solfa-Solmisation 163

    Verzeichnis der Liedanfänge 165
    Literaturverzeichnis 169

  • Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
    Highlife. Entwicklung und Stilformen ghanaischer Gegenwartsmusik.
    Mainzer Beiträge zur Afrika-Forschung, Band 3.
    Münster: Litt Verlag, 1996. 522 p.
    ISBN 3-89473-779-4

    INHALT

    Vorwort 1

    1. Einleitung 5
    1.1 Die Mfantse-fo in der Geschichtsschreibung Ghanas 7
    1.2 Über den Ursprung der Mfantse-fo 12
    1.3 Zur Etymologie des Begriffs “Mfantse” 14
    1.4 Zur Familien-und Klanstruktur der Mfantse-fo 15
    1.5 Religiöse Bräuche und Weltanschauung der Mfantse 22
    1.5.1 “Nana Nyankopon” – der allmächtige Gott und das
              Mfantse-Marchen 24
    1.5.2 “Nanaam’ Pow” – Symbol der einstigen Mfantse-Einheit 31
    1.6 Die Mfantse-Akan-Sprache 33
    1.7 Mfantse-fo und ihre Nachbarn 39
    1.8 Traditionelle und moderne Erziehung der Mfantse-fo 42
    1.9 Die Mfantse-Wirtschaft – Eine Quelle musikalischer
           Tätigkeit 44

    2. Anfange der Neo-Traditionellen Musik in Ghana: Adaha 63
    2.1 Einleitung 65
    2.2 Die Instrumente des Adaha-Ensembles 65
    2.3 Die Melodik der Adaha-Musik 69
    2.4 Die Rhythmik der Adaha-Musik 73
    2.5 Der formale Ablauf der Adaha-Musik 76

    3. Von Adaha zur Brassband-Musik 93
    3.1 Einleitung 95
    3.2 Musikalischer Wandel 97
    3.2.1 Vom traditionellen 12er-Rhythmus zum 2/4 Takt 98
    3.2.2 Vom traditionellen Modalsystem zur westlichen
    Dur-Moll Tonalitat 106
    3.2.3 Von Wechselgesang und Strophenform zur “Songform” 112
    3.3 Die wichtigsten Brassbands 114
    3.4 Brassband und neo-traditionelle Tänze 114
    3.5 Gibt es einen Highlife Dance? 127
    3.6 Brassband-Highlife und der “African Blues” 128

    4. Neo-Traditionelle Musik:
        “Singing Bands” mit Perkussion
    141
    4.1 Einleitung 143
    4.2 Konkoma 144
    4.2.1 Die Organisation des Konkoma-Ensembles 145
    4.2.2 Die Musik der Konkoma 153
    4.2.3 Konkoma-Musik und Tanz 159
    4.2.4 Konkoma-Musik und der African Blues 160
    4.2.5 Konkoma und der neue Rhythmus 163
    4.2.6 Konkoma als Kriegspropaganda und der Konkoma-
             Wettbewerb 166
    4.2.7 Ablauf einer Konkoma-Aufführung 169
    4.3 Weitere Gesangsgruppen mit obligater Perkussion 177
    4.3.1 Von Siolele zu Oge und Kpanlogo 178
    4.3.2 Ahyewa 185
    4.3.3 Osibisaba 194

    5. Die Gitarre und die Guitar-Music 201
    5.1 Einleitung 203
    5.2 Afrikanische und europäische Saiteninstrumente in
          der Akan-Gesellschaft 203
    5.3 Sam – die “traditionelle” Gitarre der Akan-Musik 206
    5.4 Der Guitar-Stil und die Musik Sam’s 208
    5.4.1 Adwen da nsum‘ (Der Wels lebt im Wasser) 208
    5.4.2 Wogyem‘ m odede (Man verschmaht mich) 212
    5.4.3 Kumase E.D. (Kumase Elder Dempster) 214
    5.4.4 Sekunde mpanyimfo (Der Altenrat von Sekondi) 216
    5.4.5 Banjo-und Gitarrenmusik in Asante 220
    5.5 Palmwine-Music 226
    5.5.1 Traditionelle Palmwine-Songs 227
    5.5.2 Neo-Palmwine-Songs 230
    5.5.3 Palmwine-Chords 232
    5.5.4 Palmwine-Chords und neo-traditionelle
             Gitarre der Asante 244
    5.5.5 KwaaMensah 245
    5.5.6 E .K. Nyame und das Akan Trio 255
    5.5.7 Die Gitarre und der “African Blues” 264
    5.5.8 Kakaiku 270
    5.5.9 Onyina 282

    6. Hlghlife: Eine Form Ghanaischer Gegenwartsmusk? 291
    6.1 Einleitung 293
    6.2 Woher kommt – und was bedeutet “Highlife”? 294
    6.2.1 Bisherige Versuche zur Definition von Highlife 297
    6.2.2 Entstehung und Interpretation des Namens “Highlife” 303
    6.2.3 Ballroom Orchestras und Highlife Dancebands 306
    6.2.4 Highlife und Jazz 311
    6.3 Highlife der 50er Jahre: Wettbewerb zwischen 
          Highlife-Dancebands und Brassbands 313
    6.4 Highlifemusik der 60er Jahre: ein neuer Klang durch
          Arrangements 324
    6.4.1 Sammy Lartey – die Professionalisierung der
             Highlife-Musik 327
    6.4.2 Der Highlife-Wettbewerb von 1961 – die Highlife-Musik
              wird professionell 329
    6.4.3 Die Broadway Danceband und der Highlife-“Jazz” 337
    6.4.4 Das Ende der Broadway Bands: Ökonomische und
             politische Gründe 345
    6.4.5 Uhuru Danceband: Bigband-Arrangements 347
    6.4.6 Highlife Dancebands Ghanas 351

    7. Institutionalisierte Wechselrede und 
        Musikalische Mehrstmmigkeit
    359
    7.1 Rhetorische Grundlagen des deklamatorischen Gesangs 366
    7.2 Andere Quellen des deklamatorischen Singens 370

    8. Musik In den Christlichen Kirchen 377
    8.1 Neo-religiöse Musik der Mfantse 379
    8.2 Die “Singing Band” 380
    8.3 Lieder der Singing Band 381
    8.4 Die Mfantse-Lyrics 386
    8.4.1 Zur Definition und Interpretation 386
    8.4.2 Mfantse-“Lyrics in der Praxis 389
    8.4.3 Training zur Deklamation für die Mfantse-Lyrics 397
    8.4.4 Bedeutung der Mfantse-Lyrics für die Methodisten-Kirche
             Ghanas 400

    9. Musik in der Schule 411
    9.1 Einleitung 413
    9.2 Bedeutung der Schulmusik für missionarische Zwecke 413
    9.3 Die Bedeutung und Anwendung der Schulmusik 414
    9.4 “School bands“ und “marching songs” 417
    9.5 Lieder für den Musikunterricht 422
    9.6 Nkonkontsiwa – die Kaulquappe 426
    9.7 Andere Anwendung der Lieder in den Schulen 433

    10. Niedergang des Highlife – Entstehung
           neuer Musikformen
    441
    10.1 Einleitung 443
    10.2 Auflösung der Bands und Niedergang von Night-Clubs 443
    10.3 Afternoon-Jump 444
    10.4 Soul-Musik und Highlife 445
    10.5 Die Verminderung der Musikqualität in Ghana 448
    10.6 Burger-Highlife 449
    10.7 Die Wiederbelebung der Ahyewa- und Konkoma-Musik 
            sowie des rhythmischen Sprechgesanges 456
    10.8 Zur Situation der ghanaischen Gegenwartsmusik 458
    10.8.1 Instrumente 458
    10.8.2 Kooperation der Hotel- und Barbesitzer 459
    10.8.3 Der Mangel an Instrumentalmusikern 460

    Zusammenfassung 462

    Anhang 471
    Anhang I: Lieder von Sam aus der Erinnerung transkribiert 473
    Anhang II: Verzeichnis der Liederbeispiele 483
    Anhang III: Abbildungen 487
    Anhang IV: Landkarten 503
    Anhang V: Literaturverzeichnis 513

  • Shipley, Jesse Weaver:
    Living the Hiplife.
    Celebrity and Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Popular Music.

    Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2013. 329 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8223-5352-2 (cloth) 978-0-8223-5366-9 (pbk)

    CONTENTS

    List of illustrations ix
    Acknowledgments xi

    Introduction
    Aesthetics and Aspiration 1

    1.
    Soul to Soul: Value Transformations and Disjunctures
    of Diaspora in Urban Ghana 28

    2.
    Hip-Hop Comes to Ghana: State Privatization and an
    Aesthetic of Control 51

    3.
    Rebirth of Hip: Afro-Cosmopolitanism and Masculinity
    in Accra’s New Speech Community 80

    4.
    The Executioner’s Words: Genre, Respect, and
    Linguistic Value 108

    5.
    Scent of Bodies: Parody as Circulation 134

    6.
    Gendering Value for a Female Hiplife Star:
    Moral Violence as Performance Technology 163

    7.
    No. 1 Mango Street: Celebrity Labor and Digital
    Production as Musical Value 198

    8.
    Ghana@5O in the Bronx:
    Sonic Nationalism and New Diasporic Disjunctures 230

    Conclusion
    Rockstone’s Office:
    Entrepreneurship and the Debt of Celebrity 267

    Notes 285
    Bibliography303
    Index 317

  • Sutherland, Efua:
    The Original Bob. The Story of Bob Johnson Ghana’s Ace Comedian.
    Accra: Anowou Educational Publications, 1970. 25 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    The Original Bob 5
    The Making of a Theatre Man 6
    The Cinema 7
    Decision 7
    The Birth of a Company 8
    A Two Bobs Comic Act 10
    Words Composed by Bob Johnson 11
    The Story of a Two Bobs’ Play:
     Afei Menu Moho (Had I Known) 13
    Acceptance 15
    Tour outside the Gold Coast 16
    The Coronation and after 20
    Sam the Guitarist 22
    Sam and His Party (Kwame Esiar) 22
    Bob Johnson and the Axim Trio 23

  • Younge, Pascal Yao:
    Music and Dance Traditions of Ghana. History, Performance and Teaching.
    Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company Inc., Publishers, 2011. 448 p.
    ISBN 978-0-7864-4992-7 

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments xi

    Forewords
    Daniel Avorgbedor
    African Arts in Education: Theory and Practice 1
    Komla Amoaku
    Perspectives on Ghanaian Music 2
    Francis Nii-Yartey
    Perspectives on Ghanaian Dances 5

    Preface 7
    Introduction: Ghana in Perspective 9

    Part One Dance-Drumming of the Southeastern Eves 13
    1. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background of the
        Southeastern Eves of Ghana 16
    2. Adzogbo Ritual Dance-Drumming Ceremony 33
    3. Agbadza Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 46
    4. Atibladekame Women’s Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 52
    5. Atrikpui Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 61
    6. Atsiagbeko Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 70
    7. Gadzo Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 78
    8. Gahv Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 84

    Part Two Dance-Drumming of the Central and Northern Eves 91
    9. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
         of the Central and Northern Eves of Ghana 94
    10. Adevu Hunters’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 104
    11. Boboobo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 112
    12. Egbanegba Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 120
    13. Gbolo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 125

    Part Three. Dance-Drumming of the Gas 131
    14. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background 
          of the Gas of Ghana 134
    15. Gome Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 147
    16. Kolomashie Recreational Dance-Drumming Cerenmony 155
    17. Kpanlongo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 160

    Between pages 166 and 167 are 16 colour plates containing 25 images

    Part Four Dance-Drumming of the Akans 167
    18. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
          of the Akans of Ghana 170
    19. Adowa Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 180
    20. Asaadua Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 189
    21. Sikyi Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 193
    22. Kete Royal Dance-Drumming Ceremony 198

    Part Five Dance-Drumming of the Dagbamba 203
    23. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
           of the Dagbamba of Ghana 206
    24. Baamaaya Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 213
    25. Bla Religious Dance-Drumming Ceremony 222
    26. Jera Religious Dance-Drumming Ceremony 230
    27. Tora Women’s Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 238

    Part Six Songs and Percussion Scores 245
    28. Transcriptions and Analysis of Songs 246
    – Southeastern Eves Songs 246
    – Central and Northern Eves Songs 270
    – Ga Songs 285
    – Akan Songs 294
    – Dagbamba Songs 303
    29. A Taste of the Percussion Ensembles 314
    – Southeastern Eves Percussion Ensembles 314
    – Central and Northern Eves Percussion Ensembles 326
    – Ga Percussion Ensembles 332
    – Akan Percussion Ensembles 337
    – Dagbamba Percussion Ensembles 345

    Part Seven Teaching African Music and Dance-Drumming 351
    30. Components of an African Music Dance-Drumming
           Curriculum 352
    31. Activities for Teaching Boboobo Dance-Drumming 367

    Appendix: Performing Groups and Notes on DVDs 405

    Glossary 419
    Bibliography and Further Reading 429
    Index 439

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    CONTENTS

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  • KPMG:
    A Comprehensive Study of the Music Sector in Ghana. Final Report.
    Accra: KPMG Ghana, 2014. 290 p.

    CONTENTS

    1 Executive Summary 11
    1.1 Introduction 11
    1.2 Country Profile 11
    1.3 The Creative Industries in Ghana 11
    1.4 Music Sector Overview 12
    1.5 Market Characteristics 12
    1.6 Regional and Local Sector Dynamics 13
    1.7 Regulatory Framework 13
    1.8 Economic Value Analysis 13
    1.9 Social Contribution 15
    1.10 Industry Infrastructure 16
    1.11 International Dynamics 17
    1.12 Linkage with other Sectors 17
    1.13 SWOT Analysis 17
    1.14 Recommendations 18
    1.15 Conclusion 19

    2 Introduction 20
    2.1 Project Background 20
    2.2 Objectives 20
    2.3 Scope of Work 20
    2.4 Justification 21
    2.5 Methodology 22
       2.5.1 Sources of Data 22
       2.5.2 Sampling Techniques 24
    2.6 Limitations 24
    2.7 Conclusion 24

    3 Country Profile 26
    3.1 Introduction 26
    3.2 Political Environment 26
    3.3 Economic Environment 27
    3.4 Social Dynamics 29
    3.5 Technological Factors 31
    3.6 Country Outlook 31
    3.7 Conclusion 32

    4 The Creative Industry in Ghana 33
    4.1 Overview 33
    4.2 Characteristics of the Creative Industry in Ghana 34
    4.2.1 Overview 34
    4.3 Conclusion 36

    5 Music Sector Overview 37
    5.1 Historical Perspective 37
       5.1.1 Overview 37
       5.1.2 Music Genres 37
    5.2 Industry Oversight 42
    5.3 Professional Organizations 45
       5.3.1 Creators Associations 45
       5.3.2 Producers Associations 46
       5.3.3 Collective Management Organization (CMO) 47
    5.4 Current State of the Sector – Challenges and Opportunities 48
    5.5 Porter‘s Five Forces Model 48
    5.6 Conclusion 49

    6 Market Characteristics 51
    6.1 Overview of Music Value Chain 51
    6.1.1 Typical Music Value Chain around the World 51
    6.1.2 Music Value Chain in Ghana 52
    6.2 Volume of production by Type 75
    6.3 Conclusion 78

    7 Regional and Local Sector Dynamics 79
    7.1 Regional Features of the Sector 79
    7.2 Conclusion 93

    8 Regulatory Framework 94
    8.1 Review of Regulations 94
    8.2 Review of Policy Documents 97

    9 Economic Value Analysis 101
    9.1 Introduction 101
    9.2 Employment Characteristics 101
       9.2.1 Size of the Sector 101
       9.2.2 Characteristics of Employment 103
    9.3 Value of Sector (Revenue Sources and Estimation) 124
       9.3.1 Framework for Analysis 124
       9.3.2 Domestic Revenue Estimation 126
    9.4 Contribution to GDP 131
    9.4.1 Summary of GDP 131

    10 Social Characteristics & Contribution 132
    10.1 Social characteristics of the sector 132
    10.1.1 Creators 132
    10.1.2 Business Category 133
    10.2 Overview 141
    10.3 Sociological aspects of music 141
    10.4 Benefits of music 141
    10.5 Social groups and events 142
       10.5.1 Social circles in Ghana 142
       10.5.2 Choral groups 142
       10.5.3 Traditional/folkloric bands 145
       10.5.4 Public bands 148

    11 Industry Infrastructure 150
    11.1 Introduction 150
    11.2 Training Institutions 150
       11.2.1 Educational Institutions 150
       11.2.2 Capacity Building Institutions 153
    11.3 Manufacturers 155
       11.3.1 Local Instrument Manufacturers 155
       11.3.2 Audio/Visuals 158
    11.4 Digital Music Downloads 159
    11.5 Event organisers and Venues 160
       11.5.1 Data analysis – Event organisers 162
       11.5.2 Data analysis – Venue operators 163

    12 International Dynamics 166
    12.1 Ghanaian music abroad 166
       12.1.1 Live performances 166
       12.1.2 International awards 166
       12.1.3 Operational base of music distributors 167
    12.2 Exposure of tourists to Ghanaian music 167
    12.3 Volume of Exports 170

    13 Linkage with other Sectors 172
    13.1 Music as a subject – Musicology 172
    13.2 Music as an art – Applied Musicology 172
       13.2.1 Film 173
       13.2.2 Theatre art 173
       13.2.3 Fashion 174
       13.2.4 Medicine & therapy 175

    14 SWOT Analyses 177
    14.1 Introduction 177
    14.2 Strengths 178
    14.3 Weaknesses 178
    14.4 Opportunities 184
    14.5 Threats 184
    14.6 Conclusion 185

    15 Recommendations 186
    15.1 Observations and Recommendations 186

    16 Conclusion 191
    16.1 Objectives 191
    16.2 Methodology 191
    16.3 Findings 191
    16.4 Observations and Recommendations 192

    17 Appendices 193
    17.1 Appendix A – Details of Educational Institutions 193
    17.2 Appendix B – Questionnaires administered for the survey 198
    17.3 Appendix C – Names of some sensational Ghanaian music professionals,
            music archives and the impact of colonialism 274
    17.4 Appendix D – Ghanaian population according to age groups and regions 276
    17.5 Appendix E – Categories and sub-categories of the Music Industry 278
    17.6 Committee Members 288
    17.6.1 Oversight Committee Members 288
    17.6.2 Technical Committee Members 288

    18 Bibliography 290

  • Johnson, John William:
    ‘Heelloy’. Modern Poetry and Songs of the Somalis.
    London: HAAN Publishing, 1998. xxiii & 241 p.
    ISBN 978-1-874-20981-2

    CONTENTS

    Foreword to the first edition by B. W. Andrzejewski ix
    Foreword to the 1996 edition by Abdilahi Qarshi xi
    Preface to the first edition xv
    Preface to the 1996 edition xxiii

    1. Introduction
    The social context 1
    The Nature of Traditional Pastoralist Poetry 12
    The Historical Development of Modern Oral Poetry 17

    2. The Family of Miniature Genres
    The Nature of the Family of Miniature Genres 27
    The Poetry of the Miniature Family 32

    3. The emergence of the Belwo
    The Historical Background 49
    The Belwo is Born 53
    The Poetry of the Belwo 59

    4. The Heello: Period One
    The Metamorphosis: Belwo to Heello A 75
    The Modem Poem: Heello A to Heello B 82

    5. The Heello: Period Two
    The Historical Background 95
    The Poetry of the Second Period 103

    6. The Heello: Period Three
    The Historical Background 117
    The Poetry of the Third Period 146

    7. Characteristics of the Heello: All Periods
    Themes Common to All Periods 175
    Structural Characteristics and
    Development Common to All Periods 190
    The Impact of Media on Modern Poetry 208

    8. Conclusion
    The Inheritance of the Heello 215
    Forces Behind the Success and Development of Modern Poetry 216

  • Rentink, Sonja:
    Kpanlogo. Conflict, Identity Crisis and Enjoyment in a Ga Drum Dance.
    M.A. thesis. University of Amsterdam, 2003. 101 p.

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 4

    Introduction 5
       Methodology 6
       Technical notes 8

    1 Ga culture 10
    Geographical 10
    Historical 11
    Religion 12
    Social organization 12
       Chieftaincy 12
       Family 13
    Music 13
    Festivals 16

    2 Colonialism: Neo-Traditional Music and Cultural Groups 17
    Colonialism in Ghana 17
       Pre-colonial period 17
       Colonial Period 18
       Post-colonial period 19
    Neo-traditional music? 21
       Traditional music 21
       Popular music 22
       Neo-traditional? 23
    Current developments in Ghanaian traditional music 25
       Cultural groups 25

    3 Kpanlogo 28
    Frankie Laine and Otoo Lincoln 28
    Cultural, social and political context 30
       The creation of kpanlogo 30
       Influence of rock ‘n roll 30
       Conflicts 31
       Political situation 32
       Spread around the world 33
    Traditional background 34
       Gome 34
       Kolomashie 37
       Oge 38
       Highlife 39

    4 Musical aspects 43
    The ensemble and the instruments 43
       The ensemble 43
       The instruments, organology 43
    The musical structure 45
    The songs 48
       Mo mibi le ohami 48
       Mo ble mi oho mie 49
       Alonte juloni 50
       Jelenbi 50
       ABC 52
       Everybody bring your calabash 53
       Daadaa Buko 54
    The dance 57
       Some typical kpanlogo movements 60
    Performance practice 63

    Summary 66

    Conclusions 67

    Bibliography 68
    Appendix 71
    List of collected material 95

  • Matczynski, William:
    Highlife and its Roots: Negotiating the Social, Cultural, and Musical Continuities Between Popular and Traditional Music in Ghana.
    Macalester College (Saint Paul, Minn,), Music Honors Projects. Paper 10, 2011. 67 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1

    Chapter Two
    Musical Continuities between Popular and Traditional Music 19

    Chapter Three
    Highlife Texts 32
    Anansesem, Storytelling and Guitar-Band Highlife

    Chapter Four
    Fusion Music and Experimentalism 46
    Traditional Music as Resource

    Conclusion 55

    Appendix
    Highlife Photographs 57

    Listening List 64
    Bibliography 65

  • Rumbolz, Robert Charles:
    “A Vessel for Many Things”: Brass Bands in Ghana.
    Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.), 2000. 444p.
    ProQuest no. 3005648

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements viii
    Illustrations x
    Technical Notes xi
       Geographic xi
       Linguistic xii
       Currency xii
    Musical Transcriptions xii

    Prologue: Rebirth at Kwanyako xiv

    Introduction 1
       Methodology 3
       Organization of the Dissertation 5

    Part I

    1 Foundations of Thought 9
    Terms of Culture Contact 9
       Ethnomusicology and the Terms of Culture Contact 16
    Research on West African Music 22
       “A Novel Object” – A.M. Jones and the Rhythm Fetish 25
       Influence of Technology 27
       Role of the Indigenous Scholar 29
       Anthropology and African Musicology 30
    Foundations of West African Music 35

    2 Brass Bands as Power Symbol 40
    Military Music in Europe 40
       A Brief History of Brass Bands in Britain 41
       Missionary Zeal and the Brass Bands 43
    A Brief History of European Presence in Ghana 45
    The Missionary Presence in the Gold Coast 49
       Evangelism and Band Proliferation: The Case of Kyebi 52
    Early Military Music in the Gold Coast 53
       Other External Influences 56
    Musical Responses to Culture Change 57
       Palm-wine 58
       Adaha and Other Band Styles 60
       Neo-Traditional Styles 64
    British Response to Native Bands 64
    World War I and the Bands 68
    In Summary 71

    3 Mass Education and National Culture 72
    Cocoa Boom 72
    World War II 74
    Mass Education 75
    Independence  78
    In Summary 80

    Part II

    4 Band Types and Social Formations 83
    The Bands 83
       Church Bands 84
       Village and Town Bands 88
       Security Forces and Service Bands 88
       School Bands 91
       Virtual Bands 92
    Professionalism 92
    Instruments: Ownership and Quality 95
    Access to Instruments 98
    Extra-musical Concerns 100
       Brass, the Body, and Gender 100
    In Summary 102

    5 Musical Particulars 105
    Training 105
       Rehearsing 106
       Music Literacy 107
       Tone and Tuning 111
       Rhythm 117
        “Encomium”: The Fine Art of Improvisation 126
       Leadership 128
       Akan Evaluative Terms 129
    In Summary 131

    6 Performance Dynamics 134
    Venue and Repertoire 134
       Competition 137
    Dress 141
    Movement and Proxemics 145
       Dance 145
       Playing Posture 147
    Reception 148
    Performances Observed 150
       Funeral 150
       Sporting Events 152
       Easter Picnic 155
       National Holidays 157
    In Summary 161

    7 Current Trends in Brass Band Performance 163
       Amplification 163
       Transnationalism 165
       Re-Contextualization 166

    Conclusion 171

    Appendix I: Bands in Study 175
    Appendix II: Notes on Sound Examples 177
    Appendix III: Transcriptions 180
    Appendix IV: Paschal Yao Younge 188
    Appendix V: Presbyterian Brass Band Guild Survey 196
    Appendix VI: King’s Day Celebration Program 202

    Glossary 204

    Bibliography 209
       Interviews 209 
       Works Cited 212

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    Fela. Kalakuta Notes. 2nd edition
    Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2015.  xii & 326 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8195-7539-5 (paper) 978-0-8195-7540-1 (ebook)

    CONTENTS

    Foreword by Banning Eyre ix
    Introduction 1

    Part 1 Early Days
    1 The Birth of Afrobeat 27
    2 Joe Mensah Remembers 41
    3 Fela in Ghana 49
    4 Stan Plange Remembers 29

    Part 2 Confrontation
    5 Kalakuta is Born 67
    6 “JB” Talks about Fela 73
    7 The Kalakuta Republic 81
    8 The Black President 114
    9 Amsterdam and After 125

    Part 3 Retrospect
    10 Mac Tontoh on Fela 139
    11 Frank Talk about Fela 152
    12 Obiba Plays It Again 165
    13 Smart Binete Sorts It Out 174
    14 Anku Checks Out the Beat 178
    15 Nana Danso Orchestrates 183
    16 Some Early Afro-Fusion Pioneers 197
    17 Interview with Fela 204
    18 Afterthoughts and Updates 209
    19. Felabrations at Home and Abroad 238

    Chronology 259
    Notes 269
    Selected Bibliography 281
    Discography 285
    Appendix A: “Shuffering and Shmiling” Score 303
    Index 309

  • Erlmann, Veit (ed.):
    Populäre Musik in Afrika.

    Veröffentlichungen des Museum für Völkerkunde.
    Neue Folge 53. Abteilung Musikethnologie VIII.
    Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde, 1991. 312 pp. & 2 CDs.
    ISBN 3-88609-213-5

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  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

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  • Younge, Pascal Yao:
    Music and Dance Traditions of Ghana. History, Performance and Teaching.
    Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company Inc., Publishers, 2011. 448 p.
    ISBN 978-0-7864-4992-7 

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments xi

    Forewords
    Daniel Avorgbedor
    African Arts in Education: Theory and Practice 1
    Komla Amoaku
    Perspectives on Ghanaian Music 2
    Francis Nii-Yartey
    Perspectives on Ghanaian Dances 5

    Preface 7
    Introduction: Ghana in Perspective 9

    Part One Dance-Drumming of the Southeastern Eves 13
    1. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background of the
        Southeastern Eves of Ghana 16
    2. Adzogbo Ritual Dance-Drumming Ceremony 33
    3. Agbadza Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 46
    4. Atibladekame Women’s Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 52
    5. Atrikpui Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 61
    6. Atsiagbeko Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 70
    7. Gadzo Warriors’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 78
    8. Gahv Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 84

    Part Two Dance-Drumming of the Central and Northern Eves 91
    9. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
         of the Central and Northern Eves of Ghana 94
    10. Adevu Hunters’ Dance-Drumming Ceremony 104
    11. Boboobo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 112
    12. Egbanegba Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 120
    13. Gbolo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 125

    Part Three. Dance-Drumming of the Gas 131
    14. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background 
          of the Gas of Ghana 134
    15. Gome Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 147
    16. Kolomashie Recreational Dance-Drumming Cerenmony 155
    17. Kpanlongo Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 160

    Between pages 166 and 167 are 16 colour plates containing 25 images

    Part Four Dance-Drumming of the Akans 167
    18. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
          of the Akans of Ghana 170
    19. Adowa Funeral Dance-Drumming Ceremony 180
    20. Asaadua Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 189
    21. Sikyi Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 193
    22. Kete Royal Dance-Drumming Ceremony 198

    Part Five Dance-Drumming of the Dagbamba 203
    23. Historical, Geographical, Cultural, and Social Background
           of the Dagbamba of Ghana 206
    24. Baamaaya Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 213
    25. Bla Religious Dance-Drumming Ceremony 222
    26. Jera Religious Dance-Drumming Ceremony 230
    27. Tora Women’s Recreational Dance-Drumming Ceremony 238

    Part Six Songs and Percussion Scores 245
    28. Transcriptions and Analysis of Songs 246
    – Southeastern Eves Songs 246
    – Central and Northern Eves Songs 270
    – Ga Songs 285
    – Akan Songs 294
    – Dagbamba Songs 303
    29. A Taste of the Percussion Ensembles 314
    – Southeastern Eves Percussion Ensembles 314
    – Central and Northern Eves Percussion Ensembles 326
    – Ga Percussion Ensembles 332
    – Akan Percussion Ensembles 337
    – Dagbamba Percussion Ensembles 345

    Part Seven Teaching African Music and Dance-Drumming 351
    30. Components of an African Music Dance-Drumming
           Curriculum 352
    31. Activities for Teaching Boboobo Dance-Drumming 367

    Appendix: Performing Groups and Notes on DVDs 405

    Glossary 419
    Bibliography and Further Reading 429
    Index 439

  • Sutherland, Efua:
    The Original Bob. The Story of Bob Johnson Ghana’s Ace Comedian.
    Accra: Anowou Educational Publications, 1970. 25 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    The Original Bob 5
    The Making of a Theatre Man 6
    The Cinema 7
    Decision 7
    The Birth of a Company 8
    A Two Bobs Comic Act 10
    Words Composed by Bob Johnson 11
    The Story of a Two Bobs’ Play:
     Afei Menu Moho (Had I Known) 13
    Acceptance 15
    Tour outside the Gold Coast 16
    The Coronation and after 20
    Sam the Guitarist 22
    Sam and His Party (Kwame Esiar) 22
    Bob Johnson and the Axim Trio 23

  • Shipley, Jesse Weaver:
    Living the Hiplife.
    Celebrity and Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Popular Music.

    Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2013. 329 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8223-5352-2 (cloth) 978-0-8223-5366-9 (pbk)

    CONTENTS

    List of illustrations ix
    Acknowledgments xi

    Introduction
    Aesthetics and Aspiration 1

    1.
    Soul to Soul: Value Transformations and Disjunctures
    of Diaspora in Urban Ghana 28

    2.
    Hip-Hop Comes to Ghana: State Privatization and an
    Aesthetic of Control 51

    3.
    Rebirth of Hip: Afro-Cosmopolitanism and Masculinity
    in Accra’s New Speech Community 80

    4.
    The Executioner’s Words: Genre, Respect, and
    Linguistic Value 108

    5.
    Scent of Bodies: Parody as Circulation 134

    6.
    Gendering Value for a Female Hiplife Star:
    Moral Violence as Performance Technology 163

    7.
    No. 1 Mango Street: Celebrity Labor and Digital
    Production as Musical Value 198

    8.
    Ghana@5O in the Bronx:
    Sonic Nationalism and New Diasporic Disjunctures 230

    Conclusion
    Rockstone’s Office:
    Entrepreneurship and the Debt of Celebrity 267

    Notes 285
    Bibliography303
    Index 317

  • Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
    Highlife. Entwicklung und Stilformen ghanaischer Gegenwartsmusik.
    Mainzer Beiträge zur Afrika-Forschung, Band 3.
    Münster: Litt Verlag, 1996. 522 p.
    ISBN 3-89473-779-4

    INHALT

    Vorwort 1

    1. Einleitung 5
    1.1 Die Mfantse-fo in der Geschichtsschreibung Ghanas 7
    1.2 Über den Ursprung der Mfantse-fo 12
    1.3 Zur Etymologie des Begriffs “Mfantse” 14
    1.4 Zur Familien-und Klanstruktur der Mfantse-fo 15
    1.5 Religiöse Bräuche und Weltanschauung der Mfantse 22
    1.5.1 “Nana Nyankopon” – der allmächtige Gott und das
              Mfantse-Marchen 24
    1.5.2 “Nanaam’ Pow” – Symbol der einstigen Mfantse-Einheit 31
    1.6 Die Mfantse-Akan-Sprache 33
    1.7 Mfantse-fo und ihre Nachbarn 39
    1.8 Traditionelle und moderne Erziehung der Mfantse-fo 42
    1.9 Die Mfantse-Wirtschaft – Eine Quelle musikalischer
           Tätigkeit 44

    2. Anfange der Neo-Traditionellen Musik in Ghana: Adaha 63
    2.1 Einleitung 65
    2.2 Die Instrumente des Adaha-Ensembles 65
    2.3 Die Melodik der Adaha-Musik 69
    2.4 Die Rhythmik der Adaha-Musik 73
    2.5 Der formale Ablauf der Adaha-Musik 76

    3. Von Adaha zur Brassband-Musik 93
    3.1 Einleitung 95
    3.2 Musikalischer Wandel 97
    3.2.1 Vom traditionellen 12er-Rhythmus zum 2/4 Takt 98
    3.2.2 Vom traditionellen Modalsystem zur westlichen
    Dur-Moll Tonalitat 106
    3.2.3 Von Wechselgesang und Strophenform zur “Songform” 112
    3.3 Die wichtigsten Brassbands 114
    3.4 Brassband und neo-traditionelle Tänze 114
    3.5 Gibt es einen Highlife Dance? 127
    3.6 Brassband-Highlife und der “African Blues” 128

    4. Neo-Traditionelle Musik:
        “Singing Bands” mit Perkussion
    141
    4.1 Einleitung 143
    4.2 Konkoma 144
    4.2.1 Die Organisation des Konkoma-Ensembles 145
    4.2.2 Die Musik der Konkoma 153
    4.2.3 Konkoma-Musik und Tanz 159
    4.2.4 Konkoma-Musik und der African Blues 160
    4.2.5 Konkoma und der neue Rhythmus 163
    4.2.6 Konkoma als Kriegspropaganda und der Konkoma-
             Wettbewerb 166
    4.2.7 Ablauf einer Konkoma-Aufführung 169
    4.3 Weitere Gesangsgruppen mit obligater Perkussion 177
    4.3.1 Von Siolele zu Oge und Kpanlogo 178
    4.3.2 Ahyewa 185
    4.3.3 Osibisaba 194

    5. Die Gitarre und die Guitar-Music 201
    5.1 Einleitung 203
    5.2 Afrikanische und europäische Saiteninstrumente in
          der Akan-Gesellschaft 203
    5.3 Sam – die “traditionelle” Gitarre der Akan-Musik 206
    5.4 Der Guitar-Stil und die Musik Sam’s 208
    5.4.1 Adwen da nsum‘ (Der Wels lebt im Wasser) 208
    5.4.2 Wogyem‘ m odede (Man verschmaht mich) 212
    5.4.3 Kumase E.D. (Kumase Elder Dempster) 214
    5.4.4 Sekunde mpanyimfo (Der Altenrat von Sekondi) 216
    5.4.5 Banjo-und Gitarrenmusik in Asante 220
    5.5 Palmwine-Music 226
    5.5.1 Traditionelle Palmwine-Songs 227
    5.5.2 Neo-Palmwine-Songs 230
    5.5.3 Palmwine-Chords 232
    5.5.4 Palmwine-Chords und neo-traditionelle
             Gitarre der Asante 244
    5.5.5 KwaaMensah 245
    5.5.6 E .K. Nyame und das Akan Trio 255
    5.5.7 Die Gitarre und der “African Blues” 264
    5.5.8 Kakaiku 270
    5.5.9 Onyina 282

    6. Hlghlife: Eine Form Ghanaischer Gegenwartsmusk? 291
    6.1 Einleitung 293
    6.2 Woher kommt – und was bedeutet “Highlife”? 294
    6.2.1 Bisherige Versuche zur Definition von Highlife 297
    6.2.2 Entstehung und Interpretation des Namens “Highlife” 303
    6.2.3 Ballroom Orchestras und Highlife Dancebands 306
    6.2.4 Highlife und Jazz 311
    6.3 Highlife der 50er Jahre: Wettbewerb zwischen 
          Highlife-Dancebands und Brassbands 313
    6.4 Highlifemusik der 60er Jahre: ein neuer Klang durch
          Arrangements 324
    6.4.1 Sammy Lartey – die Professionalisierung der
             Highlife-Musik 327
    6.4.2 Der Highlife-Wettbewerb von 1961 – die Highlife-Musik
              wird professionell 329
    6.4.3 Die Broadway Danceband und der Highlife-“Jazz” 337
    6.4.4 Das Ende der Broadway Bands: Ökonomische und
             politische Gründe 345
    6.4.5 Uhuru Danceband: Bigband-Arrangements 347
    6.4.6 Highlife Dancebands Ghanas 351

    7. Institutionalisierte Wechselrede und 
        Musikalische Mehrstmmigkeit
    359
    7.1 Rhetorische Grundlagen des deklamatorischen Gesangs 366
    7.2 Andere Quellen des deklamatorischen Singens 370

    8. Musik In den Christlichen Kirchen 377
    8.1 Neo-religiöse Musik der Mfantse 379
    8.2 Die “Singing Band” 380
    8.3 Lieder der Singing Band 381
    8.4 Die Mfantse-Lyrics 386
    8.4.1 Zur Definition und Interpretation 386
    8.4.2 Mfantse-“Lyrics in der Praxis 389
    8.4.3 Training zur Deklamation für die Mfantse-Lyrics 397
    8.4.4 Bedeutung der Mfantse-Lyrics für die Methodisten-Kirche
             Ghanas 400

    9. Musik in der Schule 411
    9.1 Einleitung 413
    9.2 Bedeutung der Schulmusik für missionarische Zwecke 413
    9.3 Die Bedeutung und Anwendung der Schulmusik 414
    9.4 “School bands“ und “marching songs” 417
    9.5 Lieder für den Musikunterricht 422
    9.6 Nkonkontsiwa – die Kaulquappe 426
    9.7 Andere Anwendung der Lieder in den Schulen 433

    10. Niedergang des Highlife – Entstehung
           neuer Musikformen
    441
    10.1 Einleitung 443
    10.2 Auflösung der Bands und Niedergang von Night-Clubs 443
    10.3 Afternoon-Jump 444
    10.4 Soul-Musik und Highlife 445
    10.5 Die Verminderung der Musikqualität in Ghana 448
    10.6 Burger-Highlife 449
    10.7 Die Wiederbelebung der Ahyewa- und Konkoma-Musik 
            sowie des rhythmischen Sprechgesanges 456
    10.8 Zur Situation der ghanaischen Gegenwartsmusik 458
    10.8.1 Instrumente 458
    10.8.2 Kooperation der Hotel- und Barbesitzer 459
    10.8.3 Der Mangel an Instrumentalmusikern 460

    Zusammenfassung 462

    Anhang 471
    Anhang I: Lieder von Sam aus der Erinnerung transkribiert 473
    Anhang II: Verzeichnis der Liederbeispiele 483
    Anhang III: Abbildungen 487
    Anhang IV: Landkarten 503
    Anhang V: Literaturverzeichnis 513

  • Sackey, Chrys Kwesi:
    Konkoma. Eine Musikform der Fanti-Jungfischer in
    den 40er und 50er Jahren (Ghana, Westafrika).
    Mainzer Ethnologische Arbeiten, Band 8. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1989. 180 p.
    ISBN 3-496-00992-6

    INHALT

    Vorwort  v
     
    1.Einleitung  1
    1.1 Erklärung des Konkoma-Begriffes 1
    1.2 Stammt der Begriff Konkoma von einer Muschel? 2
    1.3 Definition  4
     
    2.Musikalische und Wirtschaftliche Früherziehung 5
    2.1 Vorbemerkungen 5
    2.2 Afrikanische Skalensysteme und Konkoma-Lieder 5
    2.3 Erziehung der Jugend durch Singspiele 8
    2.4 Kinderlieder 9
    2.5 Musikalische Entwicklung der Mädchen 10
    2.6 Musik bei Mondschein 12
    2.7 Die musikalische Entwicklung der jungen Fischer 18
     
    3. Fischergemeinschaften 29
    3.1 Wirtschaftsaktivitäten 29
    3.2 Arbeitsteilung und Lieder bei der Arbeit 30
    3.3 Männer- und Frauenlieder – ein Vergleich 33
     
    4. Andere Musikalische Erfahrungen 37
    4.1 Reiseerfahrungen 37
    4.2 Fischer-Migration 39
    4.2.1 Canoe-men (Kanu-Männer) 41
    4.3 EinfluB des Marktgeschehens auf die Musik 43
    4.4 Spottlieder 48
    4.5 Spottlieder über Eliten 56
     
    5. Anfänge der Konkoma 58
    5.1 Vorbemerkungen 58
    5.2 Entstehungszeit 59
    5.3 Entstehungsort 60
    5.4 School drop-outs und Konkoma 61
    5.5 Merkmale der Konkoma-Musik 64
    5.6 Organisation der Konkoma 70
     
    6. Die Musikinstrumente der Konkoma 71
    6.1 Allgemeines 71
    6.2 Idiophone 72
    6.3 Membranophone 76
    6.4 Charakteristika der Konkoma-Trommeln 78
    6.5 Zusammenfassung der Musikinstrumente 81
     
    7. Die Konkoma-Musik in Beispielen 83
    7.1 Konkoma-Musikformen 83
    7.2 Konkoma-Rhythmen 92
    7.3 Die Aufführung von Konkoma-Musik 105
    7.3.1 See there!  106
    7.3.2 Tanzen zur Konkoma-Musik 108
    7.4 Exkurs 110

    8. Verbreitung von Konkoma in Ghana 113
    8.1 Konkoma und Rock’ n’Roll-Musik: Ein Vergleich 113
    8.2 Heimat der Konkoma-Musik: Die Zentralregion 114
    8.3 Verbreitung im Binnenland 115
    8.4 Wettbewerb 117
    8.4.1 Absatzpolitische Gründe des Wettbewerbs 117
    8.4.2 Kriegspropaganda 118
    8.5 Konkoma nach dem Kriegsende 120
    8.5.1 Konkoma und die “school leavers”  24
    8.5.2 Konkoma als Broterwerb 124
    8.5.3 Westliche Elemente in der Konkoma-Musik 125
    8.6 Konkoma und die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung 126
    8.6.1 Die neue soziale Wirklichkeit und Auflösung
    der Konkoma 128
     
    9. Was Kam nach Konkoma? 130

    Zusammenfassung 132

    Anmerkungen 135

    Anhang 155
    Karte 1 Übersichtskarte Ghana 155
    Karte 2 Minengebiete Ghanas 156
    Karte 3 Regionen Ghanas 157
    Karte 4 Strassennetz von Ghana 1960 158
    Tabelle Fischergemeinden der Goldküste 159
    Instrumente der Konkoma-Musik 160
    Beispiel filr die Solfa-Solmisation 163

    Verzeichnis der Liedanfänge 165
    Literaturverzeichnis 169

  • Salm, Steven James:
    “The Bukom Boys”:
    Subcultures and Identity Transformation in Accra, Ghana.
    Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2003. xiv & 320 p.
    ProQuest no. 3118070

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One
    Constructs in the History of Subcultural Youth 1
    Locating Youth: What Are Youth Subcultures? 5
    Youth and Youth Subcultures as a Topic of Scholarly Enquiry 13
    Popular Culture, Urban History, and Subcultural Representation 20

    Chapter Two
    “All Roads Lead to Accra”:
     Changing Worldviews among Urbanites 40
    The Changing Face of Accra in the Early Colonial
    Era, 1877-1918 44
    Becoming a “Colonial” City: The Struggle for Cultural
    Space, 1918-1939 48
    The Second World War and Its Aftermath 60
    Globalizing Influences during the Second World War 71
    Conclusion 80

    Chapter Three
    Crisis and Isolation: The “Invention of Youth” 83
    Population and Immigration in the Post-War Era 85
    Urban Social Problems: Housing, Economics, and
    Unemployment 92
    Social Protest 104
    Education and (Un)Employment 109
    The Problem of the School Leavers 116
    Conclusion 123

    Chapter Four
    Cultural Images and Icons: Technological Changes
    and Youth Cultural Expressions in the 1950s 127
    Media and Technology 128
    Hanging around the Cinema 144
    The Changing Cultural Scene: Class and Generational
    Divides in Popular Culture Expression 151
    Changing Modes of Dress: Zoot Suits and Youth Identity 153
    Entertainment and Nightlife in the 1950s: Elite Culture 160
    “Mainstream” Urban Culture 164
    Underclass Youth and Accra Nightlife 169
    Americanization and “Scrap Band Mania” 175
    Conclusion 183

    Chapter Five
    “Rain or Shine We Gonna’ Rock!” 187
    Subcultural Formation 190
    New Diversions 203
    Public Expressions of Rock ‘n’ Roll Culture 208
    Localizing Dance Styles: Class and Generational Conflict 217
    Mainstream Twisting 226
    Soul to Soul 230
    Conclusion: Shifting Identities in Youth Subcultural
    Expressions 232

    Chapter Six
    Modernizing Traditions: “My Own Form of Highlife” 239
    The Origins and Spread of Kpanlogo 244
    Underclass Youth as Cultural Brokers 253
    The Struggle for Control of Popular Expression 263
    Transforming Identities and Creating Opportunities 271
    Conclusion: Modernizing Tradition 276

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusion: The Transformation of Youth 279
    The Invention of Youth: The Second World War and the
    Roots of a Youth Class 280
    The Search for Meaning: New Cultural Expressions in
    the 1950s 282
    Transformed Identities: Subcultural Expressions in the
    Early Independence Era 284
    Continuity and Change in Youth Expressions 287
    Accra Subcultures: A Quest for Modernity 291

    Bibliography 293
    Vita 320

  • Reichel, Daniela:
    Populäre Musik als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher Veränderungsprozesse.
    Highlife und Hiplife in Ghana seit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg.
    Magisterarbeit. München: GRIN Verlag, 2008. 129 p.
    ISBN 978-3-640-39143-1

    INHALT

    1. Einleitung 1
    1.1 Thema und Fragestellung 1
    1.2 Der Aufbau der Arbeit 5
    1.3 Quellenlage 7
    1.4 Eigene Forschung 9
    1.5 Verständnis von Musik und Terminologien 10

    2. Die Entstehung Populärer Musik in Ghana 14
    2.1 Die Entstehung der populären Musik Highlife 15
    2.1.1 Die Entstehung des Brassband-Highlife 17
    2.1.2 Die Entstehung der Palmwine-Gitarren-Bands 19
    2.1.3 Die Entstehung der Tanzkapellen 22
    2.1.4 Die Entwicklungen nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkrieges 24
    2.1.5 Die Krise des Highlife 27
    2.2 Die Entstehung der Populären Musik Hiplife 30
    2.2.1 US-HipHop als Modell für die Internationalisierung 30
    2.2.2 HipHop in Ghana – Hiplife 39
    2.3 Zusammenfassung 50

    3. Populäre Musik als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher
         Veränderungsprozesse
    53
    3.1 Social commentaries in der ghanaischen Musik 54
    3.2 Social commentaries in der Populären Musik Highlife 58
    3.2.1 Die Entwicklungen bis zur Einführung der indirect 
             rule 1925 59
    3.2.1.1 Die Antikoloniale Einstellung in Highlife-Songs am 
                Beispiel Akpeteshie 60
    3.2.2 Von der indirect rule bis zu Unabhängigkeit 1957 61
    3.2.2.1 Das Nationalgefühl im Highlife 62
    3.2.3 Die Ära Kwame Nkrumah (1957 – 1966) 64
    3.2.3.1 Der politische Stimmungswechsel während der 
                 Nkrumah-Ära im Highlife 66
    3.2.4 Die Zeit der Militärputsche (1966 – 1981) 68
    3.2.4.1 Die politische Instabilität im Highife am Beispiel 
                Nana Kwame Ampadu 70
    3.2.5 Die Ära J.J. Rawlings (1981 – 2000) 73
    3.2.5.1 J.J. Rawlings im Highlife 74
    3.2.6 Modernisierungsprozesse nach dem Ende 
             des 2. Weltkrieges 76
    3.2.6.1 Das Spannungsverhältnis von ,,alter” und ,,neuer” 
                Lebenssituation im Highlife 77
    3.3 Social commentaries in der Populären Musik Hiplife 84
    3.3.1 Die Themen und das Selbstverständnis der 
             Hiplife – Künstler 85
    3.3.2 Der politische Machtwechsel 2001 – von der 
             NDC zur NPP 89
    3.3.2.1 Der politische Machtwechsel 2001 im 
                Hiplife – Freedom of Speech 90
    3.3.3 Politische, ökonomische und soziale Entwicklungen 
             in Ghana unter der NPP-Regierung 94
    3.3.3.1 Die Politik der NPP, soziale Stratifikation und 
               Korruption im Hiplife 96
    3.3.4 Aktuelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen und ihre 
             Auswirkungen in Ghana 100
    3.3.4.1 Aktuelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen und ihre 
               Thematisierung im Hiplife 103
    3.4 Zusammenfassung 113

    4. Resümee 117

    5. Bibliographie 121

  • Plageman, Nate:
    Highlife Saturday Night. Popular Music and Social Change in Urban Ghana.
    Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2013. 318 p.
    ISBN 978-0-253-00725-4

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Ethnomusicology multimedia series preface xiii

    Introduction: The Historical Importance of Urban Ghana’s
    Saturday Nights 1

    1.
    Popular Music, Political Authority, and Social Possibilities
    in the Southern Gold Coast, 1890-1940 31

    2.
    The Making of a Middle Class: Urban Social Clubs and the
    Evolution of Highlife Music, 1915-1940 67

    3.
    The Friction on the Floor: Negotiating Nightlife in
    Accra, 1940-1960 100

    4.
    “The Highlife Was Born in Ghana”: Politics, Culture,
    and the Making of a National Music, 1950-1965 147

    5.
    “We Were the Ones Who Composed the Songs”:
    The Promises and Pitfalls of Being a Bandsman, 1945-1970 183

    Epilogue 224

    Glossary 231
    Notes 233
    Discography 279
    Bibliography 289
    Index 311

  • Osumare, Halifu:
    The Hiplife in Ghana. West African Indigenization of Hip-Hop.
    New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., 2012. xii & 219 p.
    ISBN 978-1-349-43767-2 (softcover) 978-1-137-02164-9 (hardcover) 978-1-137-02165-6 (eBook)

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures ix
    Acknowledgments xi

    Introduction: “Every Hood Has Its Own Style” 1

    1.
    “Making An African Out of the Computer”:
    Globalization and Indigenization in Hiplife 29

    2.
    Empowering the Young: Hiplife’s Youth Agency 83

    3.
    “Society of the Spectacle”: Hiplife and Corporate Recolonialization 119

    4.
    “The Game”: Hiplife’s Counter-Hegemonic Discourse 159

    Notes 183
    Bibliography 203
    Index 213

  • Nimo, Ko:
    Ashanti Ballads. In Asante-Twi. Set in English verse by J. L. Latham.
    Kumasi: Published by the authors, 1969. 22 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Introduction 1

    Owuo ton Adee a To bi 2
    Death 3
    Sure wo yonko 4
    Beware of a Friend 5
    So dee wowo mu yie 6
    Accept your Lot 7
    Me sure wo gya mu fite 8
    Suspicion 9
    Ahantan nye10
    Pride has its Price 11
    Asamando Wonko 12
    Akyekyedee ne Adanko Annrikatuo 12
    The Kingdom of the Dead 13
    The Tortoise and the Hare 13
    Owusu se mamma 14
    The Driver’s Lament 15
    Obi Aware sem 16
    When Friends Interfere 17
    Nkrabea nni Kwatibea 18
    Fate is Just 19
    Asante Abakosem bi 20
    A History of Ashanti 21

  •  

    Mazzoleni, Florent; Kwesi Owusu & Markus Coester:
    Ghana Highlife Music.
    Bègles: Le Castor Astral, 2012. 175 p.
    ISBN 978-2-85920-908-7

    TABLE DES MATIÈRES / CONTENTS

    CLASSIC HIGHLIFE 50 8
    E .T. Mensah & His Tempos
    Stargazers
    Rhythm Aces
    Red Spots
    Delta Dandies
    Down Beats
    Alkot Dandles
    Black Beats
    Rakers
    Broadway Dance Band
    Modernaires
    Ambassador Dance Band
    Springbok Dance Band
    Comets Dance Band
    Casino Dance Band
    Casino Orchestra

    GOLDEN HIGHLIFE 60 46
    E.T. Mensah
    Louis Armstrong
    Jerry Hansen & Ramblers Dance Band
    E.K. Nyame
    King Oninya
    Ko Nimo
    The Comets
    CK Mann

    GUITAR HIGHLIFE  60/70 82
    Dr. Gyasi & His Noble Kings
    City Boys Band
    Cutlass Dance Band
    Alex Konadu
    African Brothers Band
    Yamoah’s Band
    TO Jazz
    Kaikaiku No 2 Band
    Okukuseku Band
    Prince Sparrows Band
    Opambuo Internationals
    Bob Akwaboah & His Supreme Internationals

    FUNKY HIGHLIFE 70 114
    Fela
    Faisal Helwani
    Hedzolleh
    Bunzu Soundz
    Osibisa
    Uhuru Dance Band
    Ogyatanaa Show Band
    Ebo Taylor
    Gyedu Blay Ambolley
    Pat Thomas
    Marijata
    Joe Mensah
    The Sweet Talks
    Vis A Vis
    De Frank
    B.B. Collins
    K. Frimpong
    Tony Sarfo
    Francis Kenya
    Manu Atakora & His Sound Engineers

  • Kaye, Andrew Laurence:
    Koo Nimo and his Circle: A Ghanaian Musician in Ethnomusicological Perspective.
    Ph.D. Columbia University, 1992. 526 p.
    ProQuest no. 9221168

    CONTENTS

    Introduction
    Questions and research procedures 1

    Chapter 1
    The ethnomusicological setting: The musical heritage of Ghana to the time of Koo Nimo’s childhood 13

    Chapter 2
    Childhood, youth, and formative musical experiences, 1931-1954 65

    Chapter 3
    Defining a career in science, and in music, 1954-1957 93

    Chapter 4
    Family, work, and music, 1957-1966 120

    Chapter 5
    Maturity and recognition, 1966-1978 156

    Chapter 6
    Musical activism and a widening renown, 1979-1990 207

    Chapter 7
    Koo Nimo’s musical repertory in analytic overview 243
    Part I:    Instruments and sonorities 244
    Part II:   Rhythm 266
    Part III:  Harmony 292
    Part IV: Melody 317
    Part V:  Lyrics 342
    Part VI: Performance  421

    Chapter 8
    Conclusion  485

    Bibliography 504
     
    Appendix I
    Koo Nimo’s recordings (a partial listing) 522
    Appendix II
    Films or television programs in which Koo Nimo
    appears (a partial listing) 526

  • Feld, Steven:
    Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra. Five Musical Years in Ghana.
    Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2012. 311 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8223-5162-7 

    CONTENTS

    OPUS xi

    FOUR-BAR INTRO
    “The Shape of Jazz to Come”  1

    VAMP IN, HEAD
    Acoustemology in Accra: On Jazz Cosmopolitanism 11

    FIRST CHORUS, WITH TRANSPOSITION
    Guy Warren / Ghanaba: From Afro-Jazz to Handel via Max Roach 51

    SECOND CHORUS, BLOW FREE
    Nii Noi Nortey: From Pan-Africanism to Afrifones via John Coltrane 87

    THIRD CHORUS, BACK INSIDE
    Nii Otoo Annan: From Toads to Polyrhythm via Elvin Jones and Rashied Ali 119

    FOURTH CHORUS, SHOUT TO THE GROOVE
    Por Por: From Honk Horns to Jazz Funerals via New Orleans 159

    HEAD AGAIN, VAMP OUT
    Beyond Diasporic Intimacy 199

    “DEDICATED TO YOU” 245
    HORN BACKGROUNDS, RIFFS UNDERNEATH 249
    THEMES, PLAYERS 299

  • Boateng, Samuel:
    Popular Music in Ghana:
    Women and the Changing Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality.

    MA thesis. Kent State University, 2016. 119 p.
    ProQuest no. 10169069

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures v
    Acknowledgements vi

    Chapter 1
    Introduction: Statement of Research Problem 1
    A Brief History of Ghanaian Popular Music: From Colonial Brass Bands to
    Post-Independent Highlife Bands 2
    Ghanaian Popular Music: Late 20th Century and Early 21st Century 16

    Chapter 2
    Conceptualizing the Study: Sex, Sexuality, and Gender 22
    Socio-Cultural Implications of Gender in Ghana 23
    Song Text in Ghanaian Popular Music 27
    Signs, Icons, and Symbols 30
    Images of Women Presented by Male Popular Musicians 32

    Chapter 3
    Women’s Roles and Status in Ghanaian Popular Music:
    Cultural, Historical, and Contemporary Perspectives 45
    Feminism, Sexuality and Women’s Bodies 53

    Chapter 4
    Analysis of Selected Songs and Music Videos 64
    Songs About: Motherhood, Social Expectations of Women, and Women’s Roles 65
    Songs About: Romantic Relationships and Women Empowerment (or Authority) 75
    Songs About: Sexuality and Women’s Bodies 84

    Chapter 5
    Conclusion and other Remarks 106

    Appendix and References
    Appendix 108
    Bibliography 109
    Online Sources (Discography; Videos; Other Relevant Websites) 115

  • Darkwa, Asante:
    The New Musical Traditions in Ghana.
    Ph.D. Wesleyan University, 1974. 269 p.
    ProQuest no. 7423020  

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 1

    Chapter 1
    Introduction 1

    Chapter 2
    The Introduction of Euro-American Music to Ghana 12
    The Coming of Europeans to West Africa 12
    Development of European Activities in Ghana Trading 17
    Mission Work and Commercial Enterprise 19
    The Basel Mission 22
    Establishment of Basel Mission Schools 28
    The Methodist Mission 32
    The Educational Development of the Methodist Church 39
    The Bremen Mission 41
    The Bremen Mission’s Educational Activities 43
    The Roman Catholic Missions 45
    Roman Catholic Missions’ Educational Developments 46
    The Anglican Mission 47
    Anglican Schools 48
    Other Missionary Societies and Their Activities 49
    The Castle Schools (1529-1821) 52
    Government Schools (Colonial Schools) 54

    Chapter 3
    Traditional Music and Culture Change in Ghana 60

    Chapter 4
    The New Musical Traditions 97
    Western Music (The Imported Music) 98
    The “New Music” (The New Musical Idioms of Ghanaian Creation) [136]

    Chapter 5
    Instrumental Resources and the Music of the New Groups 164

    Chapter 6
    Summary and Conclusion 200

    Appendix A
    Composers of Art Music (Some Biographical Sketches) 210
    Appendix B
    Ghanaian Art Music (Some Examples) 248
    Appendix C
    List of References 250

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    The Ghanaian Concert Party: African Popular Entertainment at the Cross Roads.
    Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, 1994. 607 p.
    ProQuest no. 9509102

    CONTENTS

    Part One
    The Ghanaian Concert Party and Highlife Music

    Chapter 1
    Introduction to the Concert Party 1-18
    Chapter 2
    The Concert Performance 19-58
    Chapter 3
    Life On The Road 59-90
    Chapter 4
    The Jaguar Jokers Background Story 91-109
    Chapter 5
    The Jaguar Jokerst Band Organisation 109-125
    Chapter 6
    Reflections on the Concert Party Genre by
    some Members of the Jaguar Jokers 126-137
    Chapter 7
    The Jaguar Jokers and the Concert Party
    Profession since the Mid-Seventies 135-150
    Chapter 8
    An Appendix of Concert Party Plays and Magical
    Shows between 1923-1992 151-171
    Chapter 9
    Major Exploratory Themes from Participatory Experience
    in the Ghanaian Popular Entertainment Field 172-188

    Part Two
    African Popular Entertainment at the Cross-Roads

    Chapter 10
    Traditional Continuities: Drama 190-206
    Chapter 11
    Traditional Continuities: Music 207-228
    Chapter 12
    Musical Change and Colonial Contact 229-249
    Chapter 13
    European Progress and Progressive Indigenisation 250-272
    Chapter 14
    The Modern and Traditional:
    Conflicting or Compatible 273-288
    Chapter 15
    Heroes of the Cultural Cross Roads 289-310
    Chapter 16
    The Black Americas and Africa: Pre-War 311-331
    Chapter 17
    The Black Americas and Africa:
    The Second World War and after  32-350
    Chapter 18
    Black Transatlantic Feedback 351-370
    Chapter 19
    City Life 371-398
    Chapter 20
    Class: Social Distance and Status Ranking 399-415
    Chapter 21
    Class: The Articulation or Masking of Class Consciousness 416-437
    Chapter 22
    The Age Gap 438-458
    Chapter 23
    Women on Stage 459-485
    Chapter 24
    Performance and Struggle 486-522

    Coda 523-528
    Footnotes (for Chapters 10 to 24) 529-577
    Bibliography 78-607

  • Collins, [Edmund] John & Flemming Harrev:
    King of the Black Beat.
    The Story of King Bruce and the Black Beats, Highlife Dance-Band of Ghana.
    Unpublished manuscript, 1991. 96 p. [blank pages omitted]
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Preface Flemming Harrev

    Chapter 1 John Collins
    An Introduction to the Early History of West African Highlife Music
    Palm-Wine and Guitar-Band Highlife       
    Brass-Band, Adaha and Konkomba Highlife        
    Dance-Band Highlife

    Chapter 2 Early Days
    Early Musical Influences
    Local Music in the Area
    Achimota College

    Chapter 3 Learning the Trompet
    Taking Up the Trompet
    Finding a Place to Rehearse
    The London Jazz Scene

    Chapter 4 Back in Accra with the Accra Orchestra
    Stock Arrangements and Highlifes
    Part-Timers
    Falling between Two Stools
    Leaving the Accra Orchestra

    Chapter 5 First Generation Black Beats
    The Influence of Louis Jordan
    Those Days of Sharing
    Saka Acquaye Leaving
    Early Repertoire
    First Recordings

    Chapter 6 The Golden Age of the Black Beats
    Louis Armstrong and the Goatee Beard Look
    The Lead Singers

    Chapter 7 The Second Generation Black
    Beats and the ‘B.B.’ Bands
    Into the Limelight Again
    Foul Play
    Playing or Promotion?
    The Seven ‘B.B.’ Bands

    Chapter 8 Music Problems and Music Unions
    The Musicians Unions
    Royalties
    MUSIGA
    Spinners and Copyright Laws
    Music Pirates

    Chapter 9 Present and Future Plans
    Future of Live Bands
    The Pull of Music

    Chapter 10 Black Beats’ Songs – Comments and Translations

    Chapter 11 Flemming Harrev
     A Discography of the Black Beats

    Index
    Photos

  •  

    Collins, [Edmund] John:
    E.T. Mensah. The King of Highlife.
    Accra: Anamsesem Publications, 1996. 60 p. (Second edition)
    ISBN 9988-552-17-3

    CONTENTS

    Foreword  vii

    Chapter 1 Early Days 1
    Chapter 2 The War and The Early Tempos 5
    Chapter 3 The King of Highlife 11
    Chapter 4 Satchmo 17
    Chapter 5 Independence 21
    Chapter 6 Travels in West Africa 25
    Chapter 7 The Thp to England 35
    Chapter 8 Problems of a Band Leader 41

    Discography 49

    Overview of Highlife 53

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    E.T. Mensah. The King of Highlife.
    London: Off the Record Press, 1986. 51 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    Introduction 1

    Chapter 1 Early Days 9
    Chapter 2 The War and The Early Tempos 13
    Chapter 3 The King of Highlife 18
    Chapter 4 Satchmo 23
    Chapter 5 Independence 27
    Chapter 6 Travels in West Africa 29
    Chapter 7 The Trip to England 37
    Chapter 8 Problems of a Band Leader 42

    Discography 49

  • Cole, Catherine M.:
    Ghana’s Concert Party Theatre.
    Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2001. 196 p.
    ISBN 0-253-33845-X

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Note on Orthography xi

    1
    Introduction 1

    2
    Reading Blackface in West Africa
    Wonders taken for signs 17

    3
    “The Rowdy Lot Created the Usual Disturbance”
    Concerts and emergent publics, 1895-1927 53

    4
    “Ohia Ma Adwennwen,” or “Use Your Gumption!”
    The pragmatics of performance, 1927-1945 78

    5
    Improvising Popular Traveling Theatre
    The poetics of invention 104

    6
    “This Is Actually a Good Interpretation of Modern Civilization”
    Staging the social imaginary, 1946-1966 133

    Epilogue 159

    Notes 163
    Bibliography 173
    Index 187

  • Brempong, Owusu:
    Akan Highlife in Ghana: Songs of Cultural Transition. Part 1 & 2.
    Ph.D. Indiana University, 1986. 357 & 712 pp.
    ProQuest no. 8617772

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgement i
    Preface iv-v
    Abstract vi-vii
    Table of Contents viii-xvi

    Chapter One
    Fieldwork and the Role of the Native Son
    Fieldwork 1-4
    The Akan and the Bono 4-27
    Highlife Research 27-31
    Insiders and Outsiders 31-41
    Notes 42-50

    Chapter Two
    Religious Background of Ghanaian Society
    Islam and the Akan 55-67
    Christianity and the Akan 67-72
    Notes 73-76

    Chapter Three
    Highlife’s History: A Broad Perspective
    Introduction 77-80
    Highlife, A Syncretic Form 81-85
    Types of Highlife Bands 85-88
    The Formation of the Band 88-92
    Dominant Themes in the Highlife Songs 92-100
    Highlife Function 100-106
    Highlife Comic Opera: The Concert Party 106-113
    Notes 114-117

    Chapter Four
    Forms of Verbal Lore in Highlife Songs
    Comparison of Highlife and Folktale Texts 118-129
    Comparison of Two Types of Performance 129-134
    Other Traditional Narratives in Highlife Performance 134-141
    Proverbs and Proverbial Sayings in Highlife Songs 141-150
    Notes 151-154

    Chapter Five
    Libation in Highlife Songs
    Libation in Highlife Songs 155-160
    Historical Meaning of the Libation 160-169
    Libation in Highlife Songs 169-176
    Devices for Introducing Libation 176-181
    Similarities of Highlife and traditional Libations 181-183
    Differences in Highlife and Traditional Libations 183-184
    Libation as Religious Poetry 184-186
    Notes 187-188

    Chapter Six
    The Concept of God in Highlife Songs
    The Concept of God in the African World 189-192
    The Concept of God in Akan Society 192-212
    Notes 213-214

    Chapter Seven
    The Concept of Witchcraft in Highlife Songs
    The Akan Matrilineal Extended Family 217-220
    The Elders 220-223
    The Chiefs 223-225
    Akan Witchcraft Belief in Highlife 225-233
    Witches as Impediment to Child Bearing 233-237
    Witches as Destroyers of Man’s Destiny 237-245
    Notes 246-248

    Chapter Eight
    Conclusion 249-261
    Notes 262-263

    Bibliography 264-285
    Vita 286

    APPENDICES INDEX

    Appendix A
    Tales in Highlife Songs
    1. Biribi Betumi Yen 288
         Something Can Overcome Us 292
    2. Menya Nkwa A Efiri Wo 296
         Life is from You 299
    3. Aku Sika [Part One] 303
         Golden Aku [Personal game] 305
    4. Aku Sika [Part Two] 308
         Golden Aku [Personal Name] 311
    5. Hini Me 315
         Open the Door for Me 318
    6. Seantie Nye 322
         Disobedience to Not Good 325
    7. Ebi Te Yie 328
         Some Sit Well 330
    8. Asem Mpe Onipa 333
         Trouble Never Likes Men 335
    9. Otan Hunu Are Kwa 338
         Mere Hatred 342
    10. Otwe Mporo 346
         The Antelope Should Not 349
    11. Esre So Oprammire 353
         The Savannah Oprammire [Snake] 355

    Appendix B
    Personal Experience Narratives
    1. Yaw Berko 359
         Yaw Berko [Personal Name] 361
    2. Obi Abayewa 364
         Smeone’s Young Woman 366
    3. Afia Dufie 369
         Afia Dufie [Personal Name] 372
    4. Nsa Yi Mempe 375
         Wine, I Don’t Like It 377
    5. Me Nneema Anko Ehyen Mu 380
         My Things Could Not Go Onto the Ship 382
    6. Onipa Num 384
         Man’s Brother/Sister 386

    Appendix C
    Death as Imagery in the Highlife Song
    1. Julie 389
         Julie [Personal Name] 391
    2. Maame Adjoa 394
         Mother Adjoa [Personal Name] 397
    3. Akwankwaa 400
         Youngster 403
    4. Onipa Awiee 407
         The End of Man 409
    5. Se Wawu Anaa 411
         Is He Dead? 413
    6. Dokoto Kokooko 416
         Doctor Knock, Knock! 418
    7. Agya Bi Wua 420
         When a Father Dies 422
    8. Wontwe Me Nyaa 424
         Draw Me Slowly 426
    9. Obi Nkyen Ye Tena Na 428
         It is Difficult to Stay with Someone 430
    10. Nenko Nefle 432
         His Family 434
    11. Owuo Aye Mebi 436
         Death Has Done Something to Me 438

    Appendix D
    Family, Elders and Witchcraft
    1. Oni Bie 441
         No Helper 443
    2. Mensuro 445
         I Am Not Afriad 447
    3. Ofie Wansena 450
         The House Fly 452
    4. Adwaree Fooee 454
         The Bathroom Became Wet 456
    5. Obi Nka N’asem 458
         One Can’t Tell His Trouble 460
    6. Mmoboraa 462
         Poor Fellow 464
    7. Abusua Nye Asafo 466
         The Family is not Asafo (Band) 468
    8. Aka M’ani 470
         I Am Perplexed 472
    9. Enowaa 474
         Mother 476
    10. Ena Eye A Mane Me 478
         Mother Send Me Something at Times 480
    11. Menko Efie Ho 482
         I Will Not Go to the House 484
    12. Wonni Panin A Due 486
         Pitiful If You Do Not Have an Elder 487
    13. Awie Me Ye 488
         I Am Finished 489

    Appendix 9
    Childbirth, Children and Orphans
    1. Awoo Ye 492
         Childbirth Is Good 494
    2. Obi Anwo Wo A 497
          If You Are Not the Child of Someone 499
    3. Yaa Boahemaa 502
         Yaa Boahemaa [Personal Name] 504
    4. Manka Se Enye Woba Ne Me 506
         Don’t Say that Because I am Not Your Child 508
    5. San Behwe Wo Mma 510
         Come Back to See Your Children 512
    6. Yedabea Mu 514
         Our Sleeping Place 516
    7. Ankonam Mmoboro Agyanka 519
         Lonely Miserable Orphan 521
    8. Obonto 523
         Obonto [Species of fish] 524
    9. Oboafo Ye Na 526
         A Helper is Scarce 528

    Appendix F
    Belief In God and Biblical Ideas
    1. Nyame Wo Pe Nye Ho 531
         God Thy Will Be Done 532
    2. Onyame Ye Kese 535
         God is Great 536
    3. Ma Ye Komm 538
         I Am Quiet 540
    4. Yesu Asenua 542
         The Cross of Jesus 544
    5. Meye Matutu Ha 546
         I Am Almost Moving From Here 549
    6. Me Gye Di Nti 552
         Because of My Faith 554

    Appendix G
    Highlife Songs on Money, Wealth and Poverty
    1. Sika Ye Ohohoo 556
         Money is a Stranger 558
    2. Sika Yi Wonya Bi A Amane 561
         This Money, If You Get Some It Is Trouble 563
    3. Sika Nti 565
         Because of Money 568
    4. Adee Ye Pe Na 571
         Things Are Difficult to Get 573
    5. Onipa Beye Den Ni? 575
         What Should Man Do? 577
    6. Nye Menko 580
         Not I Alone 582
    7. Ebe Ye Yie 584
         It Would Be Alright 586
    8. Enti Na Aye Den 588
         And So What? 590
    9. Adwoa Mansu 593
         Adwoa Don’ t Cry 594
    10. Ma Brabo 595
          My Life in This World 599

    Appendix H
    Destiny and Hatred
     1. Hyebre 602
          Destiny 605
    2. Nkrabea 608
         Destiny 610
    3. Motan me 612
         You Hate Me 614
    4. Otan Hunu Ye Ya 616
         Mere Hatred Is Painful 618
    5. Ma Ne Ntan Woe 620
         Let Him Hate You 623

    Appendix I
    Man and Woman
    1. Aware Te Se Ahwehwe 629
         Marriage is Like a Mirror 631
    2. Asem Sebe 633
         Words in Proverb 635
    3. Odo Bra 637
         Love Come [My lover come] 640
    4. Mede Me Do Ma No A 643
         When I Give My Love to Her 645
    5. Me Dofo Pa 648
         My True Lover [My good lover) 650
    6. Eye A Na Me Mu 0o 652
         I Feel It Deep 655
    7. Odo Ye Wu 659
         Everlasting Lover 661
    8. Me Dofo (Twi Soul) 663
         My Lover 664
    9. Akua Nimo 666
         Akua Nimo [Personal Name] 669
    10. Manya Hu Me Dofo 672
         Once I Have Found My Lover 674
    11. Owo Anidie 677
          She Has Respect 679
    12. Sewaa Akoto 681
          Sewaa Akoto [Personal Name] 683
    13. M’ani Mmere Obi 685
          I Don’t Envy Anyone 687
    14. Yaa Donko 689
          Yaa Donko [Personal Name] 691

    Appendix J
    Musical Transcriptions
    1. Biribi Betumi Yen 693
    2. Yaw Berko 700

  • Bame, Kwabena N.:
    Come to Laugh. African Traditional Theatre in Ghana.
    New York, N.Y.: Lilian Barber Press, 1985. 190 p. (Second revised edition)
    ISBN 0-936508-08-6

    CONTENTS

    PART 1

    Preface  5

    The History of Concert Parties 8
    The Actors, the Comedians 30
    Humor in the Plays 36
    Music and Dancing 40
    Presentation 50
    Thematic Sources 57
    Comedians and Their Audience 63
    Audience Response 68
    The Social Functions of the Plays 74

    Appendix 83
    Notes and References 97

    PART 2

    Note on the Transcripts of Two Concert Parties 101
    “The Jealous Rival” 103
    “The Ungrateful Husband” 129

  • Aniagolu, Charles:
    Osibisa. Living in the State of Happy Vibes and Criss Cross Rhythms.
    Victoria, B.C.: Trafford Publishing, 2004. 208 p.
    ISBN 1-4120-2106-5

    CONTENTS

    I. Foreword 6

    II. Critical acclaim for Osibisa 9

    III. Prologue 14

    IV. Early Days
    Asante roots 39
    Highlife 46
    Mr Duker and The Comets 50
    Cool Brittannia 55
    Roots of Afro Rock 60
    Ginger Baker and the surge of excitement 64
    Underground alternative 72

    V. Afro Rock Years
    Star attraction 85
    From The Rolling Stones to the Royal Ballet 91
    Empire of the sun 101
    Soul Food And The Jacksons 104
    Stir It up 109
    Something is seriously rotten … 113
    The Lagos jinx 131
    Flight of the Elephant 139
    Rolf Harris and the didgeridoo 149
    Ragtime 154
    Mighty men of Osibisa157
    In brotherhood we stand 161
    Black magic gremlins 168
    Fire in the rain177
    Land of the prophet 180
    Record sales don’t lie 185
    Sunset 188
    Osibisa forever 192

    VI. Epilogue 195
    VII. Sources 201
    VIII.Osibiography 203
    IX.Osibifile 206

  • Insert title etc. here
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  • Sweeney, Philip:
    Directory of World Music. A Guide to Performers and their Music.
    With Contributions from Peter Gabriel, Andy Kershaw, Giberto Gil [&] Manu Dibango.
    London: Virgin Books, 1991. 262 p.
    Section Africa 1-81
    ISBN 0-86369-378-4

    sweeney1991CONTENTS

    AFRICA

    The North and West
    Introduction: Peter Gabriel 1
    Libya 3
    Tunisia 5
    Algeria 6
    Morocco 13
    Mauritania 16
    Senegal 17
    Mali 20
    Guinea 26
    Guinea-Bissau 29
    Cape Verde 29
    Sierra Leone 31
    Côte d’Ivoire 32
    Ghana 34
    Togo and Benin 36
    Nigeria 37

    Central Africa, The South and East
    Introduction: Manu Dibango 42
    Cameroon 44
    Zaire 49
    Congo 56
    Gabon 56
    Angola 57
    Zambia 58
    Mozambique 59
    Zimbabwe 60
    South Africa 65
    Madagascar 70
    Mauritius and Reunion 71
    Tanzania and Zanzibar 72
    Kenya 74
    Uganda 76
    Burundi 76
    Ethiopia 77
    Sudan 79

  • Lee, Hélène:
    Rockers d’Afrique. Stars et légendes du rock mandinque.
    Paris: Albin Michel, 1988. 223 pp.
    ISBN 2-226-03 139-1 

    TABLE DE MATIÈRESafropop1995

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