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Alapatt, Eothen; Leonard Koloko & Chris A. Smith (eds.):
Various – Welcome To Zamrock! Vol. 1
Now Again Records ‎(Los Angeles, Calif.), CD & book, NA 5147, P2017. 104 p.

Alapatt, Eothen; Leonard Koloko & Chris A. Smith (eds.):
Various – Welcome To Zamrock! Vol. 2
Now Again Records ‎(Los Angeles, Calif.), CD & book, NA 5148, P2017. 104 p.

Chirwa, Jacob Abel:
The Song as a Medium of Social and Literary Comment. A Study of
Songs 
in the Mganda Dance Practised in Mwase Lundazi 1937-1958.
M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 1988. xv & 140 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 5.26 MB

Kazadi, Kanyabu Solomon:
A Sociological Analysis of the Production, Marketing and
Distribution of Contemporary Popular Music by Zambian Musicians.
M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2014. Xii & 126 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 2.19 MB

Koloko, Leonard:
Zambian Music Legends.
Research Triangle Park, N.C.: Lulu.com, 2012. 415 p.
Contents

Longwe, Sara [Hlupekile] & Roy Clarke:
Woman Know your Place.
The Patriarchal Message in Zambian Popular Song.
A Research Report from the Women in Music Project.
Lusaka: Zambian Association for Research and Development, 1990. Reprint 1998. iii & 269 p.
In English. Songs in Bemba, Nyanja, Senga, Tonga, and Tumbuka with parallel English translations.
Contents

Mitchell, J. Clyde:
The Kalela Dance.
Aspects of Social Relationship among Africans in Northern Rhodesia.

The Rhodes-Livingstone Papers (Lusaka), No. 27, 1956. [60 p.]
Reprint
Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1959. 52 p.
Contents

Mkandawire, Yadika:
Towards Eradiacting Piracy in Music: A Zambian Perspective.
B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2003. vi & 53 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 3.91 MB

Mtonga, Gladys:
The Content and Form of Zambian Rhumba Songs
Performed by Nashil Pichen Kazembe and Peter Tsotsi Juma.
M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 1987.

Nsanta-Kalimukwa, Natasha:
Copyrights protection in the context of the music Industry in Zambia.
B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2005. vi & 48 p.
Contents – PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.99 MB

Sichinga, Willy Geas:
Some Social and Literary Aspects in Zambian Popular Music:
The Case of Serenje Kalindula Band.
M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2008. x & 100 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 3.44 MB

Page created 01/10/2017 © afrobib.com

  • Chirwa, Jacob Abel:
    The Song as a Medium of Social and Literary Comment.
    A Study of Songs in the Mganda Dance Practised in Mwase Lundazi 1937-1958.
    M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 1988. xv & 140 p.

    CONTENTS

    Approval ii
    Declaration iii  
    Acknowledgements iv
    Abstract vi
    Table of contents ix
    Maps and illustrations xii

    Chapter One
    Introduction
    1.0 Statement of purpose 1   
    1.1 Historical background of Mwase – Lundazi Area 2
    1.2 Review of literature 7
    1.3 Methodology 7
       1.3.1 Data collection 7
       1.3.7 Data Analysis 9  

    Chapter Two
    Historical development of the Mganda dance
    2.0 Music and dance in traditional Chewa and Tumbuka society 12
    2.1 Origins of Mganda in Mwase – Lundazi 13
    2.2 Mgande dance between 1937 and 1952 17
       2.2.1 Simati phase 1937 – 1946 19
       2.2.2 Ombeza phase 1947 – 1952 21
       2.2.3 Kandale phase 1953 – 1958 23
    2.3 Mganda dance practice: A case study from the Simati phase 25
       2.3.1 The Making of a Boma 25
       2.3.2 Preparation for a performance 30
       2.3.3 The performance 31

    Chapter Three
    Social functions of Mganda dance songs
    3.0 Theoretical framework 35
    3.1 Social functions 36
       3.1.1 The Function of recreation and aesthetic enjoyment 38
       3.1.2 The Function of emotional expression 40
       3.1.3 The Function of cohesion: Education and conformity
                 to social norms 42
          3.1.3.1 Political commentary 44
          3.1.3.2 Economic commentary 47
          3.1.3.3 Social commentary 49
    3.1.4 The Function of contribution to social and cultural stability 59

    Chapter Four
    Literary features of Mganda dance songs
    4.0 The Song as lyric poetry 61
    4.1 Techniques of song composition 63
    4.2 Forms of singing 67
       4.2.1 The A – B form 68
       4.2.2 Solo and chorused refrain 69
       4.2.3 Mixed sectional form 70
    4.3 The Nature of poetry 73
        4.3.1 Emotive sounds 74
       4.3.2 Idiophones and onomatopoeias 77
       4.3.3 Repetition 80
          4.3.3.1 Anaphoric repetition 82
          4.3.3.2 Incremental repetition 82
          4.3.3.3 Parallelism 83
       4.3.4 Language   
          4.3.4.1 Linguistic borrowing 85
          4.3.4.2 Euphony 87
          4.3.4.3 Imagery 88
          4.3.4.4 Euphemism 90
          4.3.4.5 Allusions 91
          4.3.4.5 Rhythm 92

    Chapter Five
    Conclusion 95

    Footnotes 97
    Bibliography 100
    Interviews 104
    Appendix 105

  • Kazadi, Kanyabu Solomon:
    A Sociological Analysis of the Production, Marketing and
    Distribution of Contemporary Popular Music by Zambian Musicians.

    M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2014. xii & 126 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1. Introduction 1
    1.2. Popular music 2
    1.2.1. Artist versus musician 3
    1.3. Music industry 4
      1.3.1. Local versus global music industries 4
    1.4. Music in Zambia 5
    1.5. Goals of this research 6

    Chapter 2
    A theoretical and historical framework within which to contextualize the Zambian music industry
    2.1. Introduction 8
    2.2. Pierre Bourdieu and cultural studies 8
      2.2.1. Bourdieu’s concept of fields 9
      2.2.2. Bourdieu’s concept of habitus 11
    2.3. An application of fields and habitus 13

    Chapter 3
    Bourdieu’s concepts in relation to the music industry on a global, African and Zambian level
    3.1. Introduction 15
    3.2. Globalization 16
    3.3. World music 16
      3.3.1. Negative effects of “world music” 18
    3.4. Digital advancements 19
    3.5. Brief contextualisation of the global music industry 22
    3.6. An overview of the African music industry 22
    3.7. Brief exploration of music in the SADC region 24
    3.8. An overview of the Zambian music industry 25
       3.8.1. The ‘Zambian sound’ 27
    3.9. Piracy 28
    3.10. Conclusion 30

    Chapter 4
    Methodology
    4.1. Introduction 31
    4.2. The use of qualitative research methods 32
    4.3. Setting and study informants 33
    4.4. Data sources and collection procedures 34
    4.5. Internal validity 35
    4.6. Triangulation 36
    4.7. Limitations of qualitative research 37
       4.7.1. Research experiences: the emic and etic perspectives 37
    4.8. Ethical considerations 40
    4.9. Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    Institutions surrounding the music industry
    5.1. Introduction 41
    5.2. The Zambia Association of Musicians (ZAM) and Zambia
            Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCOPS) 42
      5.2.1. Zambia Association of Musicians (ZAM) 42
      5.2.2. The National Arts Council (NAC) 47
    5.3. Zambia Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCOPS) 48
      5.3.1. Challenges faced by ZAMCOPS 48
      5.3.2. Royalty collection 49
    5.4. Role of government in the music industry 50
    5.5. Corporate support 54
      5.5.1. Generation of income for businesses linked 
                to the music industry 55
    5.6. Experiences from other countries 55
    5.7. Societal perspectives of music 57
    5.8. Conclusion 60

    Chapter 6
    Production and distribution
    6.1. Introduction 62
    6.2. History of production and distribution in Zambia 62
      6.2.1. Role of radio 65
        6.2.1.1. Procedure of getting music on the airwaves 66
        6.2.1.2. Payola for more airplay 67
        6.2.1.3. Early use of Zambian music on the airwaves 69
        6.2.1.4. Censorship 69
      6.2.3. Television shows 70
      6.2.4. Music charts 71
      6.2.5. Music videos 75
      6.2.6. Albums 76
      6.2.7. Live performances 77
    6.3. Online methods 78
      6.3.1. Online magazines 78
      6.3.2. Online music for purchase or free downloads 79
      6.3.3. Profile pages 79
      6.3.4. Online purchases 80
      6.3.5. Challenges of distributing music 82
    6.4. Conclusion 82

    Chapter 7
    The creative process of music production
    7.1. Introduction 84
    7.2. Early development of musical interest 84
      7.2.1. Official musical training 84
      7.2.2. Self-taught 86
    7.3. Groups versus solo musicians 87
      7.3.1. Sources of income 89
      7.3.2. Merchandise 91
      7.3.4. Collaborations 91
    7.4. Management of artists 93
      7.4.1. The role of managers 93
    7.5. Record labels and studios 96
      7.5.1. Home studios 96
      7.5.2. National studios 97
      7.5.3. Challenges experienced by studios 97
      7.5.4. Contracts 100
    7.6. Challenges experienced by musicians 103
    7.7. Conclusion 105

    Chapter 8
    Concluding remarks
    8.1. Introduction 107
    8.2. Fields and habitus 107
    8.3. Challenges within the industry 108
    8.4. Methods to build a career 109
    8.5. Conclusion 111

    Appendix viii
    List of interviewees and respondents ix
    Abbreviations xi

  • Koloko, Leonard:
    Zambian Music Legends.
    Research Triangle Park, N.C.: Lulu.com, 2012. 415 p.
    ISBN 978-1-4709-5335-5

    CONTENTS

    (i) Dedication 6
    (ii) Acknowledgements 7
    (iii) Introduction 8

    Part One
    The Evolution of Zambian Music 11

    1. The genesis 12
    2. The great old folks 14
    – ‘Guitar men of the 1950s and 60s’
    3. Era of Imitation 29
    – ‘The Swinging 60s and early 70s’
    4. The birth and growth of zamrock 38
    – ‘The mid-70s to the late 80s’
    5. Discomania 48
    – The youth craze of the 80s
    6. Kalindula Music 55
    – Back to the roots -1980s to the 1990s
    7. Zambian reggae scene 70
    8. Zambian women in music 90
    9. Zambian rhumba 121
    10. Gospel music 131
    – Old wine in new a barrell
    11. Trials and tribulations of the 1990s 152
    12. Other voices, other choices 168
    13. They came to Zambia 192
    14. Into the new millennium 205
    15. Revelations 225
    – 2011 and Beyond: Most promising stars

    Part Two
    Galaxy of Superstars 228

    1. Tinkles – Poineers of the Zambian recording industry 229
    2. Witch – Zam-rocking with havoc 232
    3. Musi-O-Tunya – The thundering afro-rythmns 239
    4. Rikki Ililonga – Poetics… Politics and superstardom 242
    5. Keith Mlevhu – God Father of zam-rock 250
    6. Ricky Banda – The master bassist 259
    7. Paul Ngozi – The pied-piper of zam-rock 261
    8. Smokey Haangala – Gifted musician, singer and writer 266
    9. Teddy Chisi – The ‘Limbikani’ man and singing accountant 271
    10. Teddy Chilambe – The hit making folk singer and miner 272
    11. Nashil Pitchen Kazembe – King of Zambian rhumba 276
    12. P K Chishala – ‘Professor’ of controversial hits 279
    13. Alfred Kalusha Chisala – father and son legacy 282
    14. Ackim Simukonda – Man with a velvet voice 284
    15. Cosmos Zani – Master of the keyboards 287
    16. Mike Nyoni – Smooth singing zam-music giant 290
    17. Lazarus Tembo – The folk giant of vision and sound 292
    18. Anna Mwale – God mother of the Zambian music scene 294
    19. Larry Maluma – Musical ambassador to Australia 297
    20. Amayenge – Leaders in Zambian authentic vibes 301
    21. Emmanuel Mulemena – Our man of great eminence 308
    22. Mulemena Boys – Keeping the legacy alive 314
    23. Masasu Band – The great kings of manchancha 317
    24. Serenje Kalindula – Kings of kalindula music 321
    25. Shalawambe – Giants of authentic sounds 323
    26. Oliya – Youthful, energetic and talented band 326
    27. Patrick Chisembele – Whiz kid of song and dance 329
    28. Air Power – ‘That’s the way we get by …’ 332
    29. Distro Kuomboka – ‘Moving on with authentic sounds’ 334

    Part Three
    Legends behind the Scenes 336

    1. Edward Khuzwayo: Man behind The Zambia Music Parlour 337
    2. Teal Record Company 339
    3. Malachite Film Studios 343
    4. Chisha Folotiya: Mr. Mondo Music 344
    5. MUVI Studios 347
    6. DB Studios: Lusaka’s first private studio 350
    7. Peter Musungilo: Legendary sound engineer 351
    8. Print journalists 353
    9. Music promoters 357
    10. ZNBC: Mother of the Zambian music industry 359
    11. Mission Press audio/video studio 368

    Part Four
    Voices from the Diaspora 370

    Ellly ‘White’ Zulu 372
    Flinto Chandia 372
    Steve Banda Kalenga 373
    Eddie Manda 374
    Muriel Mwamba 374
    Patricia Kaoma 377
    Ken Simuyemba 378
    Chasaya Sichilima 379
    Prudence Sinkala 384
    Chilu Lemba 388
    James Mbewe 387
    Rozalla Miller 389
    Warren Mills 390
    Samantha Mumba 390
    Hil Street Soul 392
    Simwinji Zeko 393
    Bina Nkwazi 394
    Bwalya Chimfwembe 395
    Barbara Kayonde 397

    Part Five
    Quotable Quotes 398

    Stardom and greatness 399
    Music as a career 399
    Record sales 402
    Music and culture 403
    In memory of … 405
    Personal / Lifestyle 406
    Music and fashion 407
    Government support /Recognition 408
    Politics 409
    Music and economy 410
    HIV / AIDS 411
    Songs / Albums 412

  • Longwe, Sara [Hlupekile] & Roy Clarke:
    Woman Know your Place.
    The Patriarchal Message in Zambian Popular Song.
    A Research Report from the Women in Music Project.
    Lusaka: Zambian Association for Research and Development, 1990. Reprint 1998. iii & 269 p.
    In English. Songs in Bemba, Nyanja, Senga, Tonga, and Tumbuka with parallel English translations.
    ISBN 9982-818-27-9

    CONTENTS

    Preface i
    The researchers ii
    List of tables iii

    Introduction 1

    1. The song of the male moraliser 15
    Who is singing about whom 15
    The portrayal of antagonism 19
    The extent of moralising 20
    Support for matrimony 23

    2. The explicit image: woman as trouble 27
    The gender division of misbehavior 27
    The gender division as the source of marital problems 30

    3. Recognising the underlying rules of gender relationships 33
    The distinction between subject and object 33
    The songs’ hidden agenda 36
    Subject-object analysis of song performance 37
    Positive and negative subjects 39
    Overall analysis of song content 41

    4. The songs’ patriarchal message: Woman know your place 45
    Explicit and implicit male chauvinism 45
    The image of the single woman 47
    The image of the married woman 51
    Contradictory examples of independent women 53
    The image of the male singer  55
    The image of the misbehaving man 56
    The image as ideological message 59

    5. Coercion and ideology in the service of patriarchy 61
    Persuasion versus coercion 61
    The song as coercive message 61
    The problem of legitimation 63

    6. The implications of the message 67
    The ideological importance of the song 67
    The domestic position of women 68
    The implications for action 69

    7. The extent of public awareness 73
    Investigation of attitudes in three different areas 73
    Listeners’ attitudes 74
    Musicians’ attitudes 76
    Press treatment 81

    References 86

    Appendices 87
    A: Glossary of terms used 87
    B: Findings from the attitude questionnaire 93
    C: Example of an interview with a musician 102
    D: Song texts (Vernacular and English) 103
    E: List of song titles 265

  • Mitchell, J. Clyde:
    The Kalela Dance.
    Aspects of Social Relationship among Africans in Northern Rhodesia.

    The Rhodes-Livingstone Papers (Lusaka), No. 27, 1956. [60 p.]
    Reprint
    Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1959. 52 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    The opinions expressed are those of the Author alone

    Preface vii
    Introduction 1
    Kalela 1
    The dancing teams 9
    The song 5
    The origin of the dance 9
    Mbeni 10
    Prestige and the ‘European way-of-life’ 11
    Tribalism in towns 18
    Tribal distance 22
    Tribalism and categorical relationships 28
    Tribalism and urban administration 31
    Joking tribes in towns 35
    Kalela in the urban situation 42

    Appendix I
    Occupational prestige ranking  43
    Appendix II
    Ranking of tribes from the point of view of different ethnic groups 46

    Bibliography 50

    Frontispiece
    A Kalela Dance in progress in the Luanshya Management Board Location, 17th June 1951

  • Mkandawire, Yadika:
    Towards Eradicating Piracy in Music: A Zambian Perspective.
    B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2003. vi & 53 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication i 
    Contents ii
    Preface iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Quote vi

    1. Introduction 1
    1.1 Copyright 1
    1.2 Performance rights 3
    1.3 Protection of copyright and performance rights 3
    1.3.1 Infringement 3
    2. Legal framework 7
    2.1 Historical Background 7
    2.2 Overview of the law 10
    3. Piracy 19
    3.1 Definition 19
    3.1.1. Infringement as piracy  21
    3.2 Prevalence 23
    4. Effects of piracy 28
    4.1 Victims of piracy 28
       4.2 Effects of piracy 29
       4.2.1. Economic effect 29
       4.2.2. Cultural effect 30
       4.2.3. Intellectual and social effect 32
    5. Towards eradicating piracy 34
    5.1 Efforts to curb piracy 34
       5.1.1. Enactment of copyright 34
       5.1.2. Amendment to customs and excise act 35
       5.1.3. Raids 35
       5.1.4. Information to public 37
       5.1.5. Ratification of international conventions 37
       5.1.6. Reciprocal representation agreements 37
       5.1.7. Awareness amongst enforcement agencies 38
    5.2 Status quo 38
    5.3 Recommendations 39
       5.3.1. Political will 40
       5.3.2. Strengthening the law 41
       5.3.3. Institutions 41
       5.3.4. Awareness campaigns 45
       5.3.5. Law enforcement agencies 46
       5.3.6. Partnership with IFPI 48
    5.4 Conclusion

    Bibliography 52

  • Nsanta-Kalimukwa, Natasha:
    Copyrights Protection in the Context of the Music Industry in Zambia.
    B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2005. vi & 48 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One 
    1.0 Introduction
    1.1 History of copyright 5
    1.2 Justification for protecting copyright in music 6

    Chapter Two
    2.0 Piracy 9
    2.1 Socio-economic and cultural implications 16
    2.2 Systems in place to fight piracy 18

    Chapter Three
    3.0 Role of collective management of copyright- Zambia 
          Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCORPS) 22
    3.1 Socio-economic and cultural implications 25
    3.2 Payment of royalties 28

    Chapter Four
    4.0 Analysis of the provisions of The Copyright and 
          Performance Rights Act, 1994
    31
    4.1 What constitutes infringement? 32
    4.2 Enforcement mechanisms 34

    Chapter Five
    5.0 Conclusions and recommendations 41
    5.1 Lack of proper knowledge and understanding
          of copyright laws 41
    5.2 Piracy 41
    5.3 Poor enforcement 42
    5.4 Technological advances 43
    5.5 Ineffective Music promoters 43
    5.6 Lack of political will 44
    5.7 Recommendations 45

  • Sichinga, Willy Geas:
    Some Social and Literary Aspects in Zambian Popular Music:
    The Case of Serenje Kalindula Band.
    M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2008. x & 100 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication ii
    Copyright notice
    Author’s declaration
    Approval certificate
    Acknowledgement vi
    Abstract vii
    Table of contents ix

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 General 1
    1.2 Statement of purpose 1
    1.3 History of the Lala 3
    1.4 Definition of terms 4
    1.5 Justification 4
    1.6 Methodology 5
    1.7 Theoretical framework 6

    Chapter 2
    Literature review
    2.1 General 9
    2.2 Popular music 9
    2.3 Development of popular music in Zambia 11
    2.4 Kalindula as a popular music 17

    Chapter 3 
    The social aspects of Serenje Kalindula popular music 
    3.1 General 20
    3.2 Social functions of popular music 21
       3.2.1 Sociopolitical context 25
       3.2.2 Socioeconomic context 29
       3.2.3 Sociocultural context 32
       3.2.4 Music and dance 39

    Chapter 4
    Some literary aspects of Serenje Kalindula popular music
    4.1 General 42
    4.2 Songs as poems 42
    4.3The poetic nature of Serenje Kalindula popular genre 44
       4.3.1 Form 44
       4.3.2 Style 45
       4.3.3 Sound 46
          4.3.3.1 Emotive sounds 47
          4.3.3.2 Onomatopoeia 48
       4.3.4 Repetition 49
          4.3.4.1 Anaphoric repetition 51
          4.3.4.2 Incremental repetition 51
       4.3.4.3Parellelism 52
       4.3.5 Language 53
          4.3.5.1 Language borrowing 53
          4.3.5.2 Euphony 54
          4.3.5.3 Allusions 54
       4.3.6 Imagery 55
       4.3.7 Figure of speech 57
          4.3.7.1 Metaphor 57
          4.3.7.2 Simile 58
          4.3.7.3 Irony 59
          4.3.7.4 Metonymy 59

    Chapter 5  
    Conclusion
    5.1 General  61
    5.2 Summary 61
    5.3 Recommendations 65

    Bibliography 68

    Appendix A
    (i) Serenje Kalindula song texts (Lala/Bemba) 75
    (ii) Serenje Kalindula song texts (English translation) 88
    Appendix B
    Interview schedule for surviving/founder member of the band 100

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    CONTENTS

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  • Johnson, John William:
    ‘Heelloy’. Modern Poetry and Songs of the Somalis.
    London: HAAN Publishing, 1998. xxiii & 241 p.
    ISBN 978-1-874-20981-2

    CONTENTS

    Foreword to the first edition by B. W. Andrzejewski ix
    Foreword to the 1996 edition by Abdilahi Qarshi xi
    Preface to the first edition xv
    Preface to the 1996 edition xxiii

    1. Introduction
    The social context 1
    The Nature of Traditional Pastoralist Poetry 12
    The Historical Development of Modern Oral Poetry 17

    2. The Family of Miniature Genres
    The Nature of the Family of Miniature Genres 27
    The Poetry of the Miniature Family 32

    3. The emergence of the Belwo
    The Historical Background 49
    The Belwo is Born 53
    The Poetry of the Belwo 59

    4. The Heello: Period One
    The Metamorphosis: Belwo to Heello A 75
    The Modem Poem: Heello A to Heello B 82

    5. The Heello: Period Two
    The Historical Background 95
    The Poetry of the Second Period 103

    6. The Heello: Period Three
    The Historical Background 117
    The Poetry of the Third Period 146

    7. Characteristics of the Heello: All Periods
    Themes Common to All Periods 175
    Structural Characteristics and
    Development Common to All Periods 190
    The Impact of Media on Modern Poetry 208

    8. Conclusion
    The Inheritance of the Heello 215
    Forces Behind the Success and Development of Modern Poetry 216

  • Kazadi, Kanyabu Solomon:
    A Sociological Analysis of the Production, Marketing and
    Distribution of Contemporary Popular Music by Zambian Musicians.

    M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2014. xii & 126 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1. Introduction 1
    1.2. Popular music 2
    1.2.1. Artist versus musician 3
    1.3. Music industry 4
      1.3.1. Local versus global music industries 4
    1.4. Music in Zambia 5
    1.5. Goals of this research 6

    Chapter 2
    A theoretical and historical framework within which to contextualize the Zambian music industry
    2.1. Introduction 8
    2.2. Pierre Bourdieu and cultural studies 8
      2.2.1. Bourdieu’s concept of fields 9
      2.2.2. Bourdieu’s concept of habitus 11
    2.3. An application of fields and habitus 13

    Chapter 3
    Bourdieu’s concepts in relation to the music industry on a global, African and Zambian level
    3.1. Introduction 15
    3.2. Globalization 16
    3.3. World music 16
      3.3.1. Negative effects of “world music” 18
    3.4. Digital advancements 19
    3.5. Brief contextualisation of the global music industry 22
    3.6. An overview of the African music industry 22
    3.7. Brief exploration of music in the SADC region 24
    3.8. An overview of the Zambian music industry 25
       3.8.1. The ‘Zambian sound’ 27
    3.9. Piracy 28
    3.10. Conclusion 30

    Chapter 4
    Methodology
    4.1. Introduction 31
    4.2. The use of qualitative research methods 32
    4.3. Setting and study informants 33
    4.4. Data sources and collection procedures 34
    4.5. Internal validity 35
    4.6. Triangulation 36
    4.7. Limitations of qualitative research 37
       4.7.1. Research experiences: the emic and etic perspectives 37
    4.8. Ethical considerations 40
    4.9. Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    Institutions surrounding the music industry
    5.1. Introduction 41
    5.2. The Zambia Association of Musicians (ZAM) and Zambia
            Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCOPS) 42
      5.2.1. Zambia Association of Musicians (ZAM) 42
      5.2.2. The National Arts Council (NAC) 47
    5.3. Zambia Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCOPS) 48
      5.3.1. Challenges faced by ZAMCOPS 48
      5.3.2. Royalty collection 49
    5.4. Role of government in the music industry 50
    5.5. Corporate support 54
      5.5.1. Generation of income for businesses linked 
                to the music industry 55
    5.6. Experiences from other countries 55
    5.7. Societal perspectives of music 57
    5.8. Conclusion 60

    Chapter 6
    Production and distribution
    6.1. Introduction 62
    6.2. History of production and distribution in Zambia 62
      6.2.1. Role of radio 65
        6.2.1.1. Procedure of getting music on the airwaves 66
        6.2.1.2. Payola for more airplay 67
        6.2.1.3. Early use of Zambian music on the airwaves 69
        6.2.1.4. Censorship 69
      6.2.3. Television shows 70
      6.2.4. Music charts 71
      6.2.5. Music videos 75
      6.2.6. Albums 76
      6.2.7. Live performances 77
    6.3. Online methods 78
      6.3.1. Online magazines 78
      6.3.2. Online music for purchase or free downloads 79
      6.3.3. Profile pages 79
      6.3.4. Online purchases 80
      6.3.5. Challenges of distributing music 82
    6.4. Conclusion 82

    Chapter 7
    The creative process of music production
    7.1. Introduction 84
    7.2. Early development of musical interest 84
      7.2.1. Official musical training 84
      7.2.2. Self-taught 86
    7.3. Groups versus solo musicians 87
      7.3.1. Sources of income 89
      7.3.2. Merchandise 91
      7.3.4. Collaborations 91
    7.4. Management of artists 93
      7.4.1. The role of managers 93
    7.5. Record labels and studios 96
      7.5.1. Home studios 96
      7.5.2. National studios 97
      7.5.3. Challenges experienced by studios 97
      7.5.4. Contracts 100
    7.6. Challenges experienced by musicians 103
    7.7. Conclusion 105

    Chapter 8
    Concluding remarks
    8.1. Introduction 107
    8.2. Fields and habitus 107
    8.3. Challenges within the industry 108
    8.4. Methods to build a career 109
    8.5. Conclusion 111

    Appendix viii
    List of interviewees and respondents ix
    Abbreviations xi

  • Sichinga, Willy Geas:
    Some Social and Literary Aspects in Zambian Popular Music:
    The Case of Serenje Kalindula Band.
    M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2008. x & 100 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication ii
    Copyright notice
    Author’s declaration
    Approval certificate
    Acknowledgement vi
    Abstract vii
    Table of contents ix

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 General 1
    1.2 Statement of purpose 1
    1.3 History of the Lala 3
    1.4 Definition of terms 4
    1.5 Justification 4
    1.6 Methodology 5
    1.7 Theoretical framework 6

    Chapter 2
    Literature review
    2.1 General 9
    2.2 Popular music 9
    2.3 Development of popular music in Zambia 11
    2.4 Kalindula as a popular music 17

    Chapter 3 
    The social aspects of Serenje Kalindula popular music 
    3.1 General 20
    3.2 Social functions of popular music 21
       3.2.1 Sociopolitical context 25
       3.2.2 Socioeconomic context 29
       3.2.3 Sociocultural context 32
       3.2.4 Music and dance 39

    Chapter 4
    Some literary aspects of Serenje Kalindula popular music
    4.1 General 42
    4.2 Songs as poems 42
    4.3The poetic nature of Serenje Kalindula popular genre 44
       4.3.1 Form 44
       4.3.2 Style 45
       4.3.3 Sound 46
          4.3.3.1 Emotive sounds 47
          4.3.3.2 Onomatopoeia 48
       4.3.4 Repetition 49
          4.3.4.1 Anaphoric repetition 51
          4.3.4.2 Incremental repetition 51
       4.3.4.3Parellelism 52
       4.3.5 Language 53
          4.3.5.1 Language borrowing 53
          4.3.5.2 Euphony 54
          4.3.5.3 Allusions 54
       4.3.6 Imagery 55
       4.3.7 Figure of speech 57
          4.3.7.1 Metaphor 57
          4.3.7.2 Simile 58
          4.3.7.3 Irony 59
          4.3.7.4 Metonymy 59

    Chapter 5  
    Conclusion
    5.1 General  61
    5.2 Summary 61
    5.3 Recommendations 65

    Bibliography 68

    Appendix A
    (i) Serenje Kalindula song texts (Lala/Bemba) 75
    (ii) Serenje Kalindula song texts (English translation) 88
    Appendix B
    Interview schedule for surviving/founder member of the band 100

  • Nsanta-Kalimukwa, Natasha:
    Copyrights Protection in the Context of the Music Industry in Zambia.
    B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2005. vi & 48 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One 
    1.0 Introduction
    1.1 History of copyright 5
    1.2 Justification for protecting copyright in music 6

    Chapter Two
    2.0 Piracy 9
    2.1 Socio-economic and cultural implications 16
    2.2 Systems in place to fight piracy 18

    Chapter Three
    3.0 Role of collective management of copyright- Zambia 
          Music Copyright Protection Society (ZAMCORPS) 22
    3.1 Socio-economic and cultural implications 25
    3.2 Payment of royalties 28

    Chapter Four
    4.0 Analysis of the provisions of The Copyright and 
          Performance Rights Act, 1994
    31
    4.1 What constitutes infringement? 32
    4.2 Enforcement mechanisms 34

    Chapter Five
    5.0 Conclusions and recommendations 41
    5.1 Lack of proper knowledge and understanding
          of copyright laws 41
    5.2 Piracy 41
    5.3 Poor enforcement 42
    5.4 Technological advances 43
    5.5 Ineffective Music promoters 43
    5.6 Lack of political will 44
    5.7 Recommendations 45

  • Mkandawire, Yadika:
    Towards Eradicating Piracy in Music: A Zambian Perspective.
    B.L. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 2003. vi & 53 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication i 
    Contents ii
    Preface iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Quote vi

    1. Introduction 1
    1.1 Copyright 1
    1.2 Performance rights 3
    1.3 Protection of copyright and performance rights 3
    1.3.1 Infringement 3
    2. Legal framework 7
    2.1 Historical Background 7
    2.2 Overview of the law 10
    3. Piracy 19
    3.1 Definition 19
    3.1.1. Infringement as piracy  21
    3.2 Prevalence 23
    4. Effects of piracy 28
    4.1 Victims of piracy 28
       4.2 Effects of piracy 29
       4.2.1. Economic effect 29
       4.2.2. Cultural effect 30
       4.2.3. Intellectual and social effect 32
    5. Towards eradicating piracy 34
    5.1 Efforts to curb piracy 34
       5.1.1. Enactment of copyright 34
       5.1.2. Amendment to customs and excise act 35
       5.1.3. Raids 35
       5.1.4. Information to public 37
       5.1.5. Ratification of international conventions 37
       5.1.6. Reciprocal representation agreements 37
       5.1.7. Awareness amongst enforcement agencies 38
    5.2 Status quo 38
    5.3 Recommendations 39
       5.3.1. Political will 40
       5.3.2. Strengthening the law 41
       5.3.3. Institutions 41
       5.3.4. Awareness campaigns 45
       5.3.5. Law enforcement agencies 46
       5.3.6. Partnership with IFPI 48
    5.4 Conclusion

    Bibliography 52

  • Mitchell, J. Clyde:
    The Kalela Dance.
    Aspects of Social Relationship among Africans in Northern Rhodesia.

    The Rhodes-Livingstone Papers (Lusaka), No. 27, 1956. [60 p.]
    Reprint
    Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1959. 52 p.
    ISBN N/A

    CONTENTS

    The opinions expressed are those of the Author alone

    Preface vii
    Introduction 1
    Kalela 1
    The dancing teams 9
    The song 5
    The origin of the dance 9
    Mbeni 10
    Prestige and the ‘European way-of-life’ 11
    Tribalism in towns 18
    Tribal distance 22
    Tribalism and categorical relationships 28
    Tribalism and urban administration 31
    Joking tribes in towns 35
    Kalela in the urban situation 42

    Appendix I
    Occupational prestige ranking  43
    Appendix II
    Ranking of tribes from the point of view of different ethnic groups 46

    Bibliography 50

    Frontispiece
    A Kalela Dance in progress in the Luanshya Management Board Location, 17th June 1951

  • Longwe, Sara [Hlupekile] & Roy Clarke:
    Woman Know your Place.
    The Patriarchal Message in Zambian Popular Song.
    A Research Report from the Women in Music Project.
    Lusaka: Zambian Association for Research and Development, 1990. Reprint 1998. iii & 269 p.
    In English. Songs in Bemba, Nyanja, Senga, Tonga, and Tumbuka with parallel English translations.
    ISBN 9982-818-27-9

    CONTENTS

    Preface i
    The researchers ii
    List of tables iii

    Introduction 1

    1. The song of the male moraliser 15
    Who is singing about whom 15
    The portrayal of antagonism 19
    The extent of moralising 20
    Support for matrimony 23

    2. The explicit image: woman as trouble 27
    The gender division of misbehavior 27
    The gender division as the source of marital problems 30

    3. Recognising the underlying rules of gender relationships 33
    The distinction between subject and object 33
    The songs’ hidden agenda 36
    Subject-object analysis of song performance 37
    Positive and negative subjects 39
    Overall analysis of song content 41

    4. The songs’ patriarchal message: Woman know your place 45
    Explicit and implicit male chauvinism 45
    The image of the single woman 47
    The image of the married woman 51
    Contradictory examples of independent women 53
    The image of the male singer  55
    The image of the misbehaving man 56
    The image as ideological message 59

    5. Coercion and ideology in the service of patriarchy 61
    Persuasion versus coercion 61
    The song as coercive message 61
    The problem of legitimation 63

    6. The implications of the message 67
    The ideological importance of the song 67
    The domestic position of women 68
    The implications for action 69

    7. The extent of public awareness 73
    Investigation of attitudes in three different areas 73
    Listeners’ attitudes 74
    Musicians’ attitudes 76
    Press treatment 81

    References 86

    Appendices 87
    A: Glossary of terms used 87
    B: Findings from the attitude questionnaire 93
    C: Example of an interview with a musician 102
    D: Song texts (Vernacular and English) 103
    E: List of song titles 265

  • Koloko, Leonard:
    Zambian Music Legends.
    Research Triangle Park, N.C.: Lulu.com, 2012. 415 p.
    ISBN 978-1-4709-5335-5

    CONTENTS

    (i) Dedication 6
    (ii) Acknowledgements 7
    (iii) Introduction 8

    Part One
    The Evolution of Zambian Music 11

    1. The genesis 12
    2. The great old folks 14
    – ‘Guitar men of the 1950s and 60s’
    3. Era of Imitation 29
    – ‘The Swinging 60s and early 70s’
    4. The birth and growth of zamrock 38
    – ‘The mid-70s to the late 80s’
    5. Discomania 48
    – The youth craze of the 80s
    6. Kalindula Music 55
    – Back to the roots -1980s to the 1990s
    7. Zambian reggae scene 70
    8. Zambian women in music 90
    9. Zambian rhumba 121
    10. Gospel music 131
    – Old wine in new a barrell
    11. Trials and tribulations of the 1990s 152
    12. Other voices, other choices 168
    13. They came to Zambia 192
    14. Into the new millennium 205
    15. Revelations 225
    – 2011 and Beyond: Most promising stars

    Part Two
    Galaxy of Superstars 228

    1. Tinkles – Poineers of the Zambian recording industry 229
    2. Witch – Zam-rocking with havoc 232
    3. Musi-O-Tunya – The thundering afro-rythmns 239
    4. Rikki Ililonga – Poetics… Politics and superstardom 242
    5. Keith Mlevhu – God Father of zam-rock 250
    6. Ricky Banda – The master bassist 259
    7. Paul Ngozi – The pied-piper of zam-rock 261
    8. Smokey Haangala – Gifted musician, singer and writer 266
    9. Teddy Chisi – The ‘Limbikani’ man and singing accountant 271
    10. Teddy Chilambe – The hit making folk singer and miner 272
    11. Nashil Pitchen Kazembe – King of Zambian rhumba 276
    12. P K Chishala – ‘Professor’ of controversial hits 279
    13. Alfred Kalusha Chisala – father and son legacy 282
    14. Ackim Simukonda – Man with a velvet voice 284
    15. Cosmos Zani – Master of the keyboards 287
    16. Mike Nyoni – Smooth singing zam-music giant 290
    17. Lazarus Tembo – The folk giant of vision and sound 292
    18. Anna Mwale – God mother of the Zambian music scene 294
    19. Larry Maluma – Musical ambassador to Australia 297
    20. Amayenge – Leaders in Zambian authentic vibes 301
    21. Emmanuel Mulemena – Our man of great eminence 308
    22. Mulemena Boys – Keeping the legacy alive 314
    23. Masasu Band – The great kings of manchancha 317
    24. Serenje Kalindula – Kings of kalindula music 321
    25. Shalawambe – Giants of authentic sounds 323
    26. Oliya – Youthful, energetic and talented band 326
    27. Patrick Chisembele – Whiz kid of song and dance 329
    28. Air Power – ‘That’s the way we get by …’ 332
    29. Distro Kuomboka – ‘Moving on with authentic sounds’ 334

    Part Three
    Legends behind the Scenes 336

    1. Edward Khuzwayo: Man behind The Zambia Music Parlour 337
    2. Teal Record Company 339
    3. Malachite Film Studios 343
    4. Chisha Folotiya: Mr. Mondo Music 344
    5. MUVI Studios 347
    6. DB Studios: Lusaka’s first private studio 350
    7. Peter Musungilo: Legendary sound engineer 351
    8. Print journalists 353
    9. Music promoters 357
    10. ZNBC: Mother of the Zambian music industry 359
    11. Mission Press audio/video studio 368

    Part Four
    Voices from the Diaspora 370

    Ellly ‘White’ Zulu 372
    Flinto Chandia 372
    Steve Banda Kalenga 373
    Eddie Manda 374
    Muriel Mwamba 374
    Patricia Kaoma 377
    Ken Simuyemba 378
    Chasaya Sichilima 379
    Prudence Sinkala 384
    Chilu Lemba 388
    James Mbewe 387
    Rozalla Miller 389
    Warren Mills 390
    Samantha Mumba 390
    Hil Street Soul 392
    Simwinji Zeko 393
    Bina Nkwazi 394
    Bwalya Chimfwembe 395
    Barbara Kayonde 397

    Part Five
    Quotable Quotes 398

    Stardom and greatness 399
    Music as a career 399
    Record sales 402
    Music and culture 403
    In memory of … 405
    Personal / Lifestyle 406
    Music and fashion 407
    Government support /Recognition 408
    Politics 409
    Music and economy 410
    HIV / AIDS 411
    Songs / Albums 412

  • Chirwa, Jacob Abel:
    The Song as a Medium of Social and Literary Comment.
    A Study of Songs in the Mganda Dance Practised in Mwase Lundazi 1937-1958.
    M.A. University of Zambia (Lusaka), 1988. xv & 140 p.

    CONTENTS

    Approval ii
    Declaration iii  
    Acknowledgements iv
    Abstract vi
    Table of contents ix
    Maps and illustrations xii

    Chapter One
    Introduction
    1.0 Statement of purpose 1   
    1.1 Historical background of Mwase – Lundazi Area 2
    1.2 Review of literature 7
    1.3 Methodology 7
       1.3.1 Data collection 7
       1.3.7 Data Analysis 9  

    Chapter Two
    Historical development of the Mganda dance
    2.0 Music and dance in traditional Chewa and Tumbuka society 12
    2.1 Origins of Mganda in Mwase – Lundazi 13
    2.2 Mgande dance between 1937 and 1952 17
       2.2.1 Simati phase 1937 – 1946 19
       2.2.2 Ombeza phase 1947 – 1952 21
       2.2.3 Kandale phase 1953 – 1958 23
    2.3 Mganda dance practice: A case study from the Simati phase 25
       2.3.1 The Making of a Boma 25
       2.3.2 Preparation for a performance 30
       2.3.3 The performance 31

    Chapter Three
    Social functions of Mganda dance songs
    3.0 Theoretical framework 35
    3.1 Social functions 36
       3.1.1 The Function of recreation and aesthetic enjoyment 38
       3.1.2 The Function of emotional expression 40
       3.1.3 The Function of cohesion: Education and conformity
                 to social norms 42
          3.1.3.1 Political commentary 44
          3.1.3.2 Economic commentary 47
          3.1.3.3 Social commentary 49
    3.1.4 The Function of contribution to social and cultural stability 59

    Chapter Four
    Literary features of Mganda dance songs
    4.0 The Song as lyric poetry 61
    4.1 Techniques of song composition 63
    4.2 Forms of singing 67
       4.2.1 The A – B form 68
       4.2.2 Solo and chorused refrain 69
       4.2.3 Mixed sectional form 70
    4.3 The Nature of poetry 73
        4.3.1 Emotive sounds 74
       4.3.2 Idiophones and onomatopoeias 77
       4.3.3 Repetition 80
          4.3.3.1 Anaphoric repetition 82
          4.3.3.2 Incremental repetition 82
          4.3.3.3 Parallelism 83
       4.3.4 Language   
          4.3.4.1 Linguistic borrowing 85
          4.3.4.2 Euphony 87
          4.3.4.3 Imagery 88
          4.3.4.4 Euphemism 90
          4.3.4.5 Allusions 91
          4.3.4.5 Rhythm 92

    Chapter Five
    Conclusion 95

    Footnotes 97
    Bibliography 100
    Interviews 104
    Appendix 105

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    Fela. Kalakuta Notes. 2nd edition
    Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2015.  xii & 326 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8195-7539-5 (paper) 978-0-8195-7540-1 (ebook)

    CONTENTS

    Foreword by Banning Eyre ix
    Introduction 1

    Part 1 Early Days
    1 The Birth of Afrobeat 27
    2 Joe Mensah Remembers 41
    3 Fela in Ghana 49
    4 Stan Plange Remembers 29

    Part 2 Confrontation
    5 Kalakuta is Born 67
    6 “JB” Talks about Fela 73
    7 The Kalakuta Republic 81
    8 The Black President 114
    9 Amsterdam and After 125

    Part 3 Retrospect
    10 Mac Tontoh on Fela 139
    11 Frank Talk about Fela 152
    12 Obiba Plays It Again 165
    13 Smart Binete Sorts It Out 174
    14 Anku Checks Out the Beat 178
    15 Nana Danso Orchestrates 183
    16 Some Early Afro-Fusion Pioneers 197
    17 Interview with Fela 204
    18 Afterthoughts and Updates 209
    19. Felabrations at Home and Abroad 238

    Chronology 259
    Notes 269
    Selected Bibliography 281
    Discography 285
    Appendix A: “Shuffering and Shmiling” Score 303
    Index 309

  • Erlmann, Veit (ed.):
    Populäre Musik in Afrika.

    Veröffentlichungen des Museum für Völkerkunde.
    Neue Folge 53. Abteilung Musikethnologie VIII.
    Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde, 1991. 312 pp. & 2 CDs.
    ISBN 3-88609-213-5

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  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

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  • Sweeney, Philip:
    Directory of World Music. A Guide to Performers and their Music.
    With Contributions from Peter Gabriel, Andy Kershaw, Giberto Gil [&] Manu Dibango.
    London: Virgin Books, 1991. 262 p.
    Section Africa 1-81
    ISBN 0-86369-378-4

    sweeney1991CONTENTS

    AFRICA

    The North and West
    Introduction: Peter Gabriel 1
    Libya 3
    Tunisia 5
    Algeria 6
    Morocco 13
    Mauritania 16
    Senegal 17
    Mali 20
    Guinea 26
    Guinea-Bissau 29
    Cape Verde 29
    Sierra Leone 31
    Côte d’Ivoire 32
    Ghana 34
    Togo and Benin 36
    Nigeria 37

    Central Africa, The South and East
    Introduction: Manu Dibango 42
    Cameroon 44
    Zaire 49
    Congo 56
    Gabon 56
    Angola 57
    Zambia 58
    Mozambique 59
    Zimbabwe 60
    South Africa 65
    Madagascar 70
    Mauritius and Reunion 71
    Tanzania and Zanzibar 72
    Kenya 74
    Uganda 76
    Burundi 76
    Ethiopia 77
    Sudan 79

  • Lee, Hélène:
    Rockers d’Afrique. Stars et légendes du rock mandinque.
    Paris: Albin Michel, 1988. 223 pp.
    ISBN 2-226-03 139-1 

    TABLE DE MATIÈRESafropop1995

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