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Agawu, [Victor] Kofi:
Presenting African Music.
Postcolonial Notes, Queries, Positions.
New York, N.Y.: Routledge, 2003. 266 p.
Contents

Agawu, V[ictor] Kofi:
The African Imagination in Music.
New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2016. 388 p.
Contents

Charters, Samuel:
The Roots of the Blues. An African Search.
London: Quartet Books, 1981. 151 p.
Contents

Chernoff, John Miller:
African Rhythm and African Sensibility.
Aesthetics and Social Action in African Musical Idioms.
Chicago, Ill.: Chicago University Press, 1979. 261 pp. & 1 cassette
Contents

Collins, [Edmund] John:
African Musical Symbolism in Contemporary Perspektive.
Roots, Rhythms and Relativity.
Berlin: Pro Business, 2004. 397 p.
Contents

Fuhr, Jenny:
Experiencing Rhythm: Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
Ph.D. University of Southampton, 2010. xv & 246 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.60 MB

Fuhr, Jenny:
Experiencing Rhythm: Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013. ix & 195 p.
Contents

Kubik, Gerhard:
Africa and the Blues.
Jackson, Miss.: University Press of Mississippi, 1999. 240 p.
Contents

Kubik, Gerhard:
Theory of African Music. Vol. 1.
Intercultural Music Studies 7.
Wilhelmshaven: Florian Noetzel Verlag, 1994. [Including CD]. 464 p.
ISBN 3-7959-0560-5
US reprint
Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 464 p. & CD
Contents

Kubik, Gerhard:
Theory of African Music. Vol. 2.
Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 359 p. & CD
Contents

Oliver, Paul:
Savannah Syncopators. African Retentions in the Blues.
London: Studio Vista, 1970. 112 p.
Contents

Page created 19/08/2018 © afrobib.com

  • Agawu, [Victor] Kofi:
    Presenting African Music.
    Postcolonial Notes, Queries, Positions.

    New York, N.Y.: Routledge, 2003. 266 p.
    ISBN 0-415–94389-2 (paper) 0-415–94390-6 (bound)

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Introduction xi

    1. Colonialism’s Impact 1
    2. The Archive 23
    3. The Invention of “African Rhythm” 55
    4. Polymeter, Additive Rhythm, and Other Enduring Myths 71
    5. African Music as Text 97
    6. Popular Music Defended against Its Devotees 117
    7. Contesting Difference 151
    8. How Not to Analyze African Music 173
    9. The Ethics of Representation 199

    Epilogue 221
    Notes 225
    References 241
    Index 261

  • Agawu, V[ictor] Kofi:
    The African Imagination in Music.
    New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2016. 388 p.
    ISBN 978-0-19-026321-8 (pbk) 978-0-19-026320-1 (cloth)

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    About the Companion Website xi

    Introduction 1
    1. Music and/in Society 27
    2. Musical Instruments 65
    3. Language and/in Music 113
    4. The Rhythmic Imagination 155
    5. The Melodic Imagination 195
    6. The Formal Imagination 240
    7. Harmony, or Simultaneous Doing 267
    8. Appropriating African Music 305

    Discography 335
    Videography 343
    Bibliography 345
    Index 365

  • Charters, Samuel:
    The Roots of the Blues. An African Search.
    London: Quartet Books, 1981. 151 p.
    ISBN 0-7043-3416-X

    CONTENTS

      1. To The Gambia 1
      2. A Mandingo jali 10
      3. ‘I Can Tell You the History of Everything’ 23
      4. A River Place 34
      5. Toolongjong 47
      6. Some Young Griots 53
      7. Drums in the Streets 66
      8. A Meeting with Slavery 78
      9. ‘The Province of Freedom’ 96
    10. A Creole Village 110
    11. The African Blues Roots 119
    12. A Sense of Something Older 127
    13. The Bamako-Dakar International Express 137
    14. A Bridge over the Niger 146

    With photographs by the author

  • Chernoff, John Miller:
    African Rhythm and African Sensibility.
    Aesthetics and Social Action in African Musical Idioms.
    Chicago, Ill.: Chicago University Press, 1979. 261 p. & 1 cassette
    ISBN 0-226-10344-7 (cloth) 0-226-10345-5 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    List of Plates viii
    Acknowledgments ix
    Pronunciation and Transliteration xv

    Introduction
    Scholarship and Participation 1
    One
    The Study of Music in Africa 27
    Two
    Music in Africa 39
    Three
    Style in Africa 91
    Four
    Values in Africa 153

    Appendix 173
    Notes 183
    Bibliography 223
    Index 249

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    African Musical Symbolism in Contemporary Perspektive.
    Roots, Rhythms and Relativity.

    Berlin: Pro Business, 2004. 397 p.
    ISBN 3-938262-15-X

    CONTENTS

    List of figures and tables 9
    Forward 13
    Introduction 17

    Section One
    ANCIENT AFRICAN WISDOM 25

    Chapter One
    African Music as Microcosm 25
    Theme One: Polarised Tension -The On and Offbeat 25
    Theme Two: Relativity – Multiple Cross-Rhythms 28
         Ewe Children’s Song 29
         The Akan Children’s Akoko Funu Rhythmic Game 30
         The Ye-Ye Clapping Game of Ewe 30
         The Akan Ampe Rhythmic Elimination Game 31
         The Adowa Drum-Dance of the Ashanti 32
         The Agbadza Social Dance of the Ewe 34
    Theme Three: Hidden Space – Syncopation and Swing 40
         Rhythmic Syncopation 41
         The Rhythmic Flexibility of “Swing” 45
         Three Examples of the Spacey African Rhythms 49
               Rhythmic Muting: The Adowa Dance 49
               Rhythmic Editing: The Ye-Ye Children’s Game, 
              Gahu and Highlife 50
               Rhythmic Breaks and Freezes in African and 
              Black Diaspora Dance 52
    Theme Four: Holism -The Collective Beat 53
         The Interference of Cross-Rhythms 53
    Theme Five: Circularity- Rhythmic Reincarnation 57
         Five Features of the Cyclical African Beat 60
         Staggered Rhythms 60
         The Juxtaposition of Beginning and End 61
         Critical Junctures 64
         The Square Dance Within the Circle 65
         Circles of Sound and Silence 65
    Theme Six: A Driving Touch of Asymmetry –
                         The Propulsive Bell 70
    Theme Seven: Mature Poise – Master-musician and
         Centred Dancer 72
         The Balance of the Hot and Cool 75
    Theme Eight: Freedom and Necessity – The Art of Improvisation 78
    Theme Nine: The Participatory Mode – Audience Involvement 82

    Chapter Two
    The Traditional African Macrocosm and Worldview 85
    Introductory History of Africa 85
    The African Macrocosm 94
    Theme One: Polarised Tension – Divine Twins and Sexual
         Metaphors 94
         The Twinning of Spiritual On and Offbeats 94
         Sexual Polarity in Africa 96
         Conclusion 104
    Theme Two: Relativity – Polytheism, Polycalenders and
         Multiple Souls 105
         Polytheism 105
         Multiple Souls 108
         Polycyclic Calendars 110
         Polysided Life 111
         Conclusion 112
    Theme Three: Hidden Space – Cosmic and Ritual Swing 113
         Africa’s Laid-Back Creator 115
         Africa’s Offbeat Trickster Deity 119
         Ritual Intervals in Africa 120
         Conclusion 122
    Theme Four: Holism -The Animating Universal Spirit and
         Eternal Now 124
         The Universal Spirit 124
         The Eternal Now and Accumulated and Spatial Time 126
         Conclusion 128
    Theme Five: Circularity – The Eternal Return, Life Cycles, 
         Serpents and African Mandalas 129
         The African Life Cycle and Seasonal Rounds 129
         Ancient Spirals and sacred circles 133
         Serpents and other African Mandalas 137
         Conclusion 142
    Theme Six: A Driving Touch of Asymmetry –
         Tricksters and Ritual Clowns 143
         Conclusion 144
    Theme Seven: Mature Poise – Elders and the Balance of
         the Hot and Cool 145
         The Equilibrium of the Elder 145
         The Hot and the Cool of the Old Religions 147
         Conclusion 151
    Theme Eight: Freewill and Determinism 153
         The African Socio-Political Realm: Checks, Balances
          and Polycentrism 155
          African Creativity in the Modern World 158
    Theme Nine: The Participatory Mode – The Sacred Community 160

    Section Two
    THE SPACE AND INFORMATION AGE 166

    Chapter Three
    Modern Babylon: The Emergence of Industrial Babylon and
    its Mechanistic Vision
    166
    Reactions against the Mechanistic Vision 175

    Thematic Chapter One
    Polarised Tension 184
    Brain Lateralisation and Twin Psychosocial Archetypes 185
    Structuralism and the Polarity of Language and Mind 187
    Atomic Opposites and Wave Interference 189
    Conclusion 195

    Thematic Chapter Two
    Relativism 197
    Albert Einstein 198
    Psychological Complexes and Multiple Archetypes 203
    Parallel Processes and Cybernetic Counterpoint 207
    Helmholtz’s Sound Spectrum 209
    Conclusion 212

    Thematic Chapter Three
    Hidden Space 215
    The Modern Rediscovery of the Inner Realm:
    The Physiological Unconscious and Existential Emptiness 216
    Mathematical Space – Zeros, Limits and Incompleteness 219
    The Pythagorean Comma: Mathematico-Musical
    Incompleteness 222
    Cybernetic Silence and Computer Swing 227
    Atomic Gaps 229
    Cosmic Black Holes 234
    Conclusion 240
         Syncopated Structural Space 241
         Swinging Space 242

    Thematic Chapter Four
    Holism 245
    Gestalt Psychology 245
    The Balance of the Left and Right Brain 247
    Table: The complimentary partnership between the
    left and right brain modes of thinking 248
    Jungian Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious 251
    Atomic Complementarity 257
    Einstein’s Space-Time Continuum and the Interconvertability of
    Energy and Matter 258
    Universal Interconnectedness and Bell’s Theorem 259
    Universal Interconnectedness and the Laser Hologram 260
    Conclusion 262

    Thematic Chapter Five
    Circularity 265
    Einstein’s Curved Continuum 266
    A Reincarnating Universe 266
    Jungian Mandalas and the Cycle of the Self 268
    Cybernetic Unity and Information Feedback Loops 274
    Conclusion 278

    Thematic Chapter Six
    A Driving Touch of Asymmetry 281
    Musical Time: The Western Scale and Trickster Triad 282
    Two Physical Arrows of Time: Metastable Hydrogen and
    Atomic Handedness 285
    A Third Physical Arrow of Time: Entropy 286
    Conclusion 288

    Thematic Chapter Seven
    Mature Poise 290
    Psychological Stages Towards a Balanced Personality 292
    Depth Psychology and the Healing Unconscious 294
    The Mind/Body Split: The Human Potential Movement and
    Performance Therapy 297
    Getting to Roots: Linking the Past with the Present 298
    Super Strings: Uniting Hot Flux and Cool Geometries 301
    Conclusion 305

    Thematic Chapter Eight
    Freewill and Determinism 310
    Existential Freedom and Fulfilment Psychology 312
    Permutational Choice: Bi-Associationism and Lateral Thinking 313
    Obstructionist, Deconstructionism and Poetic Difference 315
    Creative Chaos 316
    Quantum Consciousness 319
    Conclusion 320

    Thematic Chapter Nine
    The Participatory Mode 323
    Participation: Social and Psychological 324
    The Ecosystem and Co-evolution 327
    The Observer Effect in the Atomic Dance 329
    Conclusion 332

    CODA 335

    Bibliography 344
    The Music of Africans and African Americans (relevant particularly
    to Chapter 1) 344
    The History, Social Systems, Religions and Aesthetics of African
    and Ancient/Pre-lndustrial Societies (relevant particularly to
    Chapter 2) 348
    Modern Social and Environmental Sciences, Mathematics,
    Cybernetics and Philosophy 355
    Modern Researchers into Physics, Astronomy, Holograms,
    Super Strings and Chaos Theory 360

    Person Index 363
    Subject Index 370
    Acknowledgements 393

  • Fuhr, Jenny:
    Experiencing Rhythm : Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
    Ph.D. University of Southampton, 2010. xv & 246 p.

    CONTENTS

    List of illustrations ix
    List of accompanying material xi
    Author’s declaration xiii
    Acknowledgements xv

    Section 1
    Introduction 1

    Section 2

    Chapter 2.1 
    Theorising ‘rhythm’
    Introduction 11
    Literature review 12
    “Contemporary Malagasy music” (Randrianary 2001) and
    the lova-tsofina 17
    The ‘6/8 rhythm’ and the role of rhythm in the musicians’
    search for identity 19
    Introduction: the concept of ‘rhythm’ 21
    The concepts of ‘metre’ and ‘measure’ – different interpretations
    and understandings 22
    Rhythm in African music and the invention of new terms 26
    Example: Discourse on rhythm in Cuban music 33
    Rhythm in culture and language 34
    Malagasy rhythm(s) 41

    Chapter 2.2
    Methodological reflections: integrating musical experiences into ethnomusicological research
    Introduction 47
    Key terms: Experiences and Self-Other dichotomy 49
    Theorising Fieldwork
        Historical reflections 50
        The idea of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ within fieldwork 53
        Experiences: ‘narrativisation of experiences’ and
        “musical being-in-the-world” (Titon 1997) 54
        ‘New fieldwork’ in ethnomusicology 56
    The importance of integrating both, the analysis of discourses
    and musical practices 58
    “Towards a (more) performative ethnomusicology” (Baily 2008) 58
    Why there is a need to participate musically 59
    Understanding musically 62
    “Presumption of Sameness” (Agawu 2003) and “Subject-Centred Ethnography” (Rice 2003) 67

    Chapter 2.3
    Fieldwork experiences
    Introduction 73
    Development of my research 73
    The role of Antananarivo 76
    Some reflections on my fieldwork in Antananarivo 78
    Development of my musical practices 82
    The interrelation of analyses of discourses and musical
    experiences – Outlook: Section 3 87

    Section 3
    Introduction section 3 – Analyses 89

    Chapter 3.1
    Contesting the ‘6/8 rhythm’
    Introduction 91
    Speech about music / Language and identity 92
    The presence of the term ‘6/8 rhythm’ in the musicians’
    discourses 96
    The ‘6/8 rhythm’ as used in Western musicology 96
    ‘6/8 rhythm’ meets lova-tsofina 99
    The importance of the research context 99
    The term ‘6/8 rhythm’ in the Malagasy context 101
        The musicians’ usage of the term ‘6/8 rhythm’:
        identification or taking distance? 101
        Terminological confusion 108
        Example salegy 108
    The challenge of the international ‘world music market’ – musicians’ individual experiences: perspectives and strategies 113
    Conclusion 119

    Chapter 3.2
    Exploring the lova-tsofina: Musician’s theories on the origin and meaning of ‘rhythm’ in Malagasy music
    Introduction 121
    The importance of listening to the musicians’ own concepts 122
    The topoi 122
        Environment 124
        Everyday life 131
        Language 138
        Dance 143
        Influences from outside 146
        Emotions and spiritual ideas 148
    Conclusion155

    Chapter 3.3
    Experiencing Rhythm
    Introduction 157
    The musical experience of ‘rhythm’ 158
        Composing and ‘malagasising’ tunes 161
        Tapping feet, counting, and clapping 166
        Intercultural musical encounters – examples of musicians’ experiences 169
    Participating musically myself 173
    The interrelation of discourses and musical experiences 174
    Examples:
        The importance of the lova-tsofina 175
         ‘6/8 rhythm’ and the opportunity of binaries and ternaries 176
        Engaging in ‘malagasising’ music 179
        The importance of language and lyrics 182
        The importance of the instrument and its playing technique 184
        The emphasis on personality/individuality in Malagasy music 189
    Outlook / further research possibilities 194
    Conclusion 198

    Section 4
    Conclusion 201

    Appendices
    Appendix I
    English translations of interview quotes (section 3) 209
    Appendix II
    List of all interviews conducted 227

    Bibliography 231

  • Fuhr, Jenny:
    Experiencing Rhythm : Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
    Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013. ix & 195 p.
    ISBN 978-1-4438-5057-6

    CONTENTS

    List of Illustrations viii
    Acknowledgements ix

    Chapter One
    Music in Contemporary Madagascar 1
    Introduction
    “Contemporary Malagasy Music” (Randrianary 2001):
       “6/8 rhythm” meets Lova-tsolina
    Fieldwork Experiences
    Outline

    Chapter Two 
    Theorising “Rhythm” 23
    Introduction
    What is “Rhythm”?
    The Concepts of “Metre” and “Measure” – Different
       Interpretations and Understandings
    Rhythm in African Music and the Invention of New Terms
    Rhythm in Culture and Language
    Malagasy Rhythin(s)

    Chapter Three 
    Musicking Researchers and Researching Musicians 47
    Introduction
    Key Terms
    The Idea of “Sell’ and “Other” within Ethnographic Fieldwork
    The Notion of “Experience”: “Narrativisation of Experiences”
       and “Musical being-in-the-world” (Titon 1997)
    The Importance of Integrating the Analysis of Discourses
       and Musical Practices
    “Towards a (more) Performative Ethnomusicology” (Baily 2008)
    Understanding Musically
    “Presumption of Sameness” (Agawu 2003) and
       “Subject-centred Ethnography” (Rice 2003)

    Chapter Four 
    Contesting the “6/8 Rhythm” 70
    Introduction
    The Importance of the Research Context
    The ”6/8 rhythm” as used in Western Musicology
    The Musicians’ Usage of the Term: Identification or
       Taking Distance? Terminological Confusion
    Example Salegy
    The Challenge of the International “World Music Market” and
       Musicians’ Individual Experiences: Perspectives and Strategies
    Conclusion

    Chapter Five
    Exploring the Lora-tsofina: Musicians’ Theories on the Origin and Meaning of “Rhythm” in Malagasy Music 99
    Introduction
    The Importance of Listening to the Musicians’
       Own Concepts
    The Topoi
    Environment
    Everyday Life
    Language
    Dance
    Influences From Outside
    Emotions and Spiritual Ideas
    Conclusion

    Chapter Six
    Experiencing “Rhythm” 143
    Introduction
    Composing and “Malagasising” Tunes
    Tapping Feet, Counting, and Clapping
    Intercultural Musical Encounters-Examples of
       Musicians’ Experiences
    Participating Musically Myself
    Examples
    The Importance of Lova-tsofina
    “6/8 rhythm” and the Opportunity of Binaries
       and Ternaries
    Engaging in “Malagasising” Music
    The importance of Language and Lyrics
    The Importance of the Instrument and its
       Playing Technique
    The Emphasis on Personality and Individuality
       in Malagasy Music
    Conclusion

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusion 178

    Bibliography 181
    Index 194

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Africa and the Blues.
    Jackson, Miss.: University Press of Mississippi, 1999. 240 p.
    ISBN 1-57806-146-6

    CONTENTS

    List of Examples     vii
    List of Figures     ix
    List of Photographs    xi
    Preface    xiii

    Part I. Out of Africa
    Introduction 3
      1. Sources, Adaptation and Innovation 5
      2. The Rise of a Sung Literary Genre 21
      3. A Strange Absence 51
      4. The West Central Sudanic Belt 63
      5. Blues Recordings Compared with Material from the
          Central Sudanic Savannah 71
      6. Some Characteristics of the Blues 82
      7. Why Did a West Central Sudanic Style Cluster
          Prevail in the Blues? 96
      8. Heterophonic versus Homophonic Multi-Part
          Schemes 105
      9. The Blues Tonal System 118
    10. The “Flatted Fifth” 146

    Part II. Return to Africa
    Introduction 155
    11. The i2-Bar Blues Form in South African kwela and
           it’s Reinterpretation 161
    12. Return to the Western Sudan 186

    Summary and Conclusions 197
    Bibliography 205
    Index 225

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Theory of African Music. Vol. 1.
    Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 464 p. & CD
    ISBN 978-0-226-45690-4 (cloth) 978-0-226-45691-1 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    Preface to Volumes I and II 6

    Introduction 9

    I.
    Xylophone Playing in Southern Uganda 47
    II.
    Harp Music of the Azande and Related Peoples in the Central
    African Republic 87
    III.
    A Structural Examination of Multi-Part Singing in East, Central and Southern Africa 769
    Section 1: Homophonic Multi-Part Singing in Bantu Musical Cultures
                      of East and Central Africa 171
    Section 2: Nsenga/Shona Harmonic Patterns and the San Heritage
                      in Southern Africa 270
    IV.
    Composition Techniques in Kiganda Xylophone Music.
    With an Introduction into Some Kiganda Musical Concepts 249
    Section 1: The Amadinda 264
    Section 2: The Akadinda 290
    Section 3: Are Amadinda and Akadinda Pieces Structurally
                      Related? 306
    Transcriptions 308
    V.
    Concepts About Movement and Sound in the Eastern Angolan Culture Area 329
    Section 1: Musical Enculturation 330
    Section 2: Patterns of Body Movement in Mbwela/Nkhangala Boys’ 
                      Initiation 349
    Section 3: Likembe Tunings and Musical Concepts of an Adolescent 
                      Kachokwe: Kufuna Kandonga 382

    Notes 405
    Bibliography 416
    Sound Examples of CD 1 456

    Contents of Volume II 464

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Theory of African Music. Vol. 2.
    Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 359 p. & CD
    ISBN 978-0-226-45693-5 (cloth) 978-0-226-45694-2 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    Author’s Preface to Volume II vi

    VI.
    The Cognitive Study of African Musical “Rhythm” 1
    Section 1: Cognitive Anthropology and African Music: 
                      What We Can Learn from Each 2
    Section 2: Timing Systems 27
    Section 3: Time-Line Patterns 52
    VII.
    African Music and Auditory Perception 85
    Section 1: Focus on Cross-Cultural Comprehension: 
                      Motor-Accents, Reference Beat and
    Metrical Inversion 85
    Section 2: Focus on “Auditory Streaming” and the I.P. Effect 707
    VIII.
    Àló-Yoruba Chantefables: An Integrated Approach towards West African Music and Oral Literature 757
    IX.
    Genealogy of a Malaŵian Musician Family: Daniel J. Kachamba (1947-1987) and His Associates 277
    X.
    African Space/Time Concepts and the Tusona Ideographs in
    Luchazi Culture 275

    Further Recommended Readings 323

    List of Musical Examples on CD II 332

    Indexes for Volumes I and II
    Index of Artists and Authors 337
    Index of African Ethnic-Linguistic Designations 344
    Index of Song Tities 348
    General Index 353

  • Oliver, Paul:
    Savannah Syncopaters. African Retentions in the Blues.
    London: Studio Vista, 1970. 112 p.
    SBN 289-79827-2 (paperback) 289-79828-0 (hardbound)

    CONTENTS

    Afternoon – Nangodi 4
    Africa and the Jazz Historian 10
    Music in West Africa 28
    Savannah Song 53
    The Source of the Slaves 67
    Africa and the Blues 84

    Notes 102
    Acknowledgments 105
    Record List 106
    Glossary of Instruments 108
    Index of Tribes and People 111

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

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  • Oliver, Paul:
    Savannah Syncopaters. African Retentions in the Blues.
    London: Studio Vista, 1970. 112 p.
    SBN 289-79827-2 (paperback) 289-79828-0 (hardbound)

    CONTENTS

    Afternoon – Nangodi 4
    Africa and the Jazz Historian 10
    Music in West Africa 28
    Savannah Song 53
    The Source of the Slaves 67
    Africa and the Blues 84

    Notes 102
    Acknowledgments 105
    Record List 106
    Glossary of Instruments 108
    Index of Tribes and People 111

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Theory of African Music. Vol. 2.
    Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 359 p. & CD
    ISBN 978-0-226-45693-5 (cloth) 978-0-226-45694-2 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    Author’s Preface to Volume II vi

    VI.
    The Cognitive Study of African Musical “Rhythm” 1
    Section 1: Cognitive Anthropology and African Music: 
                      What We Can Learn from Each 2
    Section 2: Timing Systems 27
    Section 3: Time-Line Patterns 52
    VII.
    African Music and Auditory Perception 85
    Section 1: Focus on Cross-Cultural Comprehension: 
                      Motor-Accents, Reference Beat and
    Metrical Inversion 85
    Section 2: Focus on “Auditory Streaming” and the I.P. Effect 707
    VIII.
    Àló-Yoruba Chantefables: An Integrated Approach towards West African Music and Oral Literature 757
    IX.
    Genealogy of a Malaŵian Musician Family: Daniel J. Kachamba (1947-1987) and His Associates 277
    X.
    African Space/Time Concepts and the Tusona Ideographs in
    Luchazi Culture 275

    Further Recommended Readings 323

    List of Musical Examples on CD II 332

    Indexes for Volumes I and II
    Index of Artists and Authors 337
    Index of African Ethnic-Linguistic Designations 344
    Index of Song Tities 348
    General Index 353

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Theory of African Music. Vol. 1.
    Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 2010. 464 p. & CD
    ISBN 978-0-226-45690-4 (cloth) 978-0-226-45691-1 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    Preface to Volumes I and II 6

    Introduction 9

    I.
    Xylophone Playing in Southern Uganda 47
    II.
    Harp Music of the Azande and Related Peoples in the Central
    African Republic 87
    III.
    A Structural Examination of Multi-Part Singing in East, Central and Southern Africa 769
    Section 1: Homophonic Multi-Part Singing in Bantu Musical Cultures
                      of East and Central Africa 171
    Section 2: Nsenga/Shona Harmonic Patterns and the San Heritage
                      in Southern Africa 270
    IV.
    Composition Techniques in Kiganda Xylophone Music.
    With an Introduction into Some Kiganda Musical Concepts 249
    Section 1: The Amadinda 264
    Section 2: The Akadinda 290
    Section 3: Are Amadinda and Akadinda Pieces Structurally
                      Related? 306
    Transcriptions 308
    V.
    Concepts About Movement and Sound in the Eastern Angolan Culture Area 329
    Section 1: Musical Enculturation 330
    Section 2: Patterns of Body Movement in Mbwela/Nkhangala Boys’ 
                      Initiation 349
    Section 3: Likembe Tunings and Musical Concepts of an Adolescent 
                      Kachokwe: Kufuna Kandonga 382

    Notes 405
    Bibliography 416
    Sound Examples of CD 1 456

    Contents of Volume II 464

  • Kubik, Gerhard:
    Africa and the Blues.
    Jackson, Miss.: University Press of Mississippi, 1999. 240 p.
    ISBN 1-57806-146-6

    CONTENTS

    List of Examples     vii
    List of Figures     ix
    List of Photographs    xi
    Preface    xiii

    Part I. Out of Africa
    Introduction 3
      1. Sources, Adaptation and Innovation 5
      2. The Rise of a Sung Literary Genre 21
      3. A Strange Absence 51
      4. The West Central Sudanic Belt 63
      5. Blues Recordings Compared with Material from the
          Central Sudanic Savannah 71
      6. Some Characteristics of the Blues 82
      7. Why Did a West Central Sudanic Style Cluster
          Prevail in the Blues? 96
      8. Heterophonic versus Homophonic Multi-Part
          Schemes 105
      9. The Blues Tonal System 118
    10. The “Flatted Fifth” 146

    Part II. Return to Africa
    Introduction 155
    11. The i2-Bar Blues Form in South African kwela and
           it’s Reinterpretation 161
    12. Return to the Western Sudan 186

    Summary and Conclusions 197
    Bibliography 205
    Index 225

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    African Musical Symbolism in Contemporary Perspektive.
    Roots, Rhythms and Relativity.

    Berlin: Pro Business, 2004. 397 p.
    ISBN 3-938262-15-X

    CONTENTS

    List of figures and tables 9
    Forward 13
    Introduction 17

    Section One
    ANCIENT AFRICAN WISDOM 25

    Chapter One
    African Music as Microcosm 25
    Theme One: Polarised Tension -The On and Offbeat 25
    Theme Two: Relativity – Multiple Cross-Rhythms 28
         Ewe Children’s Song 29
         The Akan Children’s Akoko Funu Rhythmic Game 30
         The Ye-Ye Clapping Game of Ewe 30
         The Akan Ampe Rhythmic Elimination Game 31
         The Adowa Drum-Dance of the Ashanti 32
         The Agbadza Social Dance of the Ewe 34
    Theme Three: Hidden Space – Syncopation and Swing 40
         Rhythmic Syncopation 41
         The Rhythmic Flexibility of “Swing” 45
         Three Examples of the Spacey African Rhythms 49
               Rhythmic Muting: The Adowa Dance 49
               Rhythmic Editing: The Ye-Ye Children’s Game, 
              Gahu and Highlife 50
               Rhythmic Breaks and Freezes in African and 
              Black Diaspora Dance 52
    Theme Four: Holism -The Collective Beat 53
         The Interference of Cross-Rhythms 53
    Theme Five: Circularity- Rhythmic Reincarnation 57
         Five Features of the Cyclical African Beat 60
         Staggered Rhythms 60
         The Juxtaposition of Beginning and End 61
         Critical Junctures 64
         The Square Dance Within the Circle 65
         Circles of Sound and Silence 65
    Theme Six: A Driving Touch of Asymmetry –
                         The Propulsive Bell 70
    Theme Seven: Mature Poise – Master-musician and
         Centred Dancer 72
         The Balance of the Hot and Cool 75
    Theme Eight: Freedom and Necessity – The Art of Improvisation 78
    Theme Nine: The Participatory Mode – Audience Involvement 82

    Chapter Two
    The Traditional African Macrocosm and Worldview 85
    Introductory History of Africa 85
    The African Macrocosm 94
    Theme One: Polarised Tension – Divine Twins and Sexual
         Metaphors 94
         The Twinning of Spiritual On and Offbeats 94
         Sexual Polarity in Africa 96
         Conclusion 104
    Theme Two: Relativity – Polytheism, Polycalenders and
         Multiple Souls 105
         Polytheism 105
         Multiple Souls 108
         Polycyclic Calendars 110
         Polysided Life 111
         Conclusion 112
    Theme Three: Hidden Space – Cosmic and Ritual Swing 113
         Africa’s Laid-Back Creator 115
         Africa’s Offbeat Trickster Deity 119
         Ritual Intervals in Africa 120
         Conclusion 122
    Theme Four: Holism -The Animating Universal Spirit and
         Eternal Now 124
         The Universal Spirit 124
         The Eternal Now and Accumulated and Spatial Time 126
         Conclusion 128
    Theme Five: Circularity – The Eternal Return, Life Cycles, 
         Serpents and African Mandalas 129
         The African Life Cycle and Seasonal Rounds 129
         Ancient Spirals and sacred circles 133
         Serpents and other African Mandalas 137
         Conclusion 142
    Theme Six: A Driving Touch of Asymmetry –
         Tricksters and Ritual Clowns 143
         Conclusion 144
    Theme Seven: Mature Poise – Elders and the Balance of
         the Hot and Cool 145
         The Equilibrium of the Elder 145
         The Hot and the Cool of the Old Religions 147
         Conclusion 151
    Theme Eight: Freewill and Determinism 153
         The African Socio-Political Realm: Checks, Balances
          and Polycentrism 155
          African Creativity in the Modern World 158
    Theme Nine: The Participatory Mode – The Sacred Community 160

    Section Two
    THE SPACE AND INFORMATION AGE 166

    Chapter Three
    Modern Babylon: The Emergence of Industrial Babylon and
    its Mechanistic Vision
    166
    Reactions against the Mechanistic Vision 175

    Thematic Chapter One
    Polarised Tension 184
    Brain Lateralisation and Twin Psychosocial Archetypes 185
    Structuralism and the Polarity of Language and Mind 187
    Atomic Opposites and Wave Interference 189
    Conclusion 195

    Thematic Chapter Two
    Relativism 197
    Albert Einstein 198
    Psychological Complexes and Multiple Archetypes 203
    Parallel Processes and Cybernetic Counterpoint 207
    Helmholtz’s Sound Spectrum 209
    Conclusion 212

    Thematic Chapter Three
    Hidden Space 215
    The Modern Rediscovery of the Inner Realm:
    The Physiological Unconscious and Existential Emptiness 216
    Mathematical Space – Zeros, Limits and Incompleteness 219
    The Pythagorean Comma: Mathematico-Musical
    Incompleteness 222
    Cybernetic Silence and Computer Swing 227
    Atomic Gaps 229
    Cosmic Black Holes 234
    Conclusion 240
         Syncopated Structural Space 241
         Swinging Space 242

    Thematic Chapter Four
    Holism 245
    Gestalt Psychology 245
    The Balance of the Left and Right Brain 247
    Table: The complimentary partnership between the
    left and right brain modes of thinking 248
    Jungian Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious 251
    Atomic Complementarity 257
    Einstein’s Space-Time Continuum and the Interconvertability of
    Energy and Matter 258
    Universal Interconnectedness and Bell’s Theorem 259
    Universal Interconnectedness and the Laser Hologram 260
    Conclusion 262

    Thematic Chapter Five
    Circularity 265
    Einstein’s Curved Continuum 266
    A Reincarnating Universe 266
    Jungian Mandalas and the Cycle of the Self 268
    Cybernetic Unity and Information Feedback Loops 274
    Conclusion 278

    Thematic Chapter Six
    A Driving Touch of Asymmetry 281
    Musical Time: The Western Scale and Trickster Triad 282
    Two Physical Arrows of Time: Metastable Hydrogen and
    Atomic Handedness 285
    A Third Physical Arrow of Time: Entropy 286
    Conclusion 288

    Thematic Chapter Seven
    Mature Poise 290
    Psychological Stages Towards a Balanced Personality 292
    Depth Psychology and the Healing Unconscious 294
    The Mind/Body Split: The Human Potential Movement and
    Performance Therapy 297
    Getting to Roots: Linking the Past with the Present 298
    Super Strings: Uniting Hot Flux and Cool Geometries 301
    Conclusion 305

    Thematic Chapter Eight
    Freewill and Determinism 310
    Existential Freedom and Fulfilment Psychology 312
    Permutational Choice: Bi-Associationism and Lateral Thinking 313
    Obstructionist, Deconstructionism and Poetic Difference 315
    Creative Chaos 316
    Quantum Consciousness 319
    Conclusion 320

    Thematic Chapter Nine
    The Participatory Mode 323
    Participation: Social and Psychological 324
    The Ecosystem and Co-evolution 327
    The Observer Effect in the Atomic Dance 329
    Conclusion 332

    CODA 335

    Bibliography 344
    The Music of Africans and African Americans (relevant particularly
    to Chapter 1) 344
    The History, Social Systems, Religions and Aesthetics of African
    and Ancient/Pre-lndustrial Societies (relevant particularly to
    Chapter 2) 348
    Modern Social and Environmental Sciences, Mathematics,
    Cybernetics and Philosophy 355
    Modern Researchers into Physics, Astronomy, Holograms,
    Super Strings and Chaos Theory 360

    Person Index 363
    Subject Index 370
    Acknowledgements 393

  • Chernoff, John Miller:
    African Rhythm and African Sensibility.
    Aesthetics and Social Action in African Musical Idioms.
    Chicago, Ill.: Chicago University Press, 1979. 261 p. & 1 cassette
    ISBN 0-226-10344-7 (cloth) 0-226-10345-5 (paper)

    CONTENTS

    List of Plates viii
    Acknowledgments ix
    Pronunciation and Transliteration xv

    Introduction
    Scholarship and Participation 1
    One
    The Study of Music in Africa 27
    Two
    Music in Africa 39
    Three
    Style in Africa 91
    Four
    Values in Africa 153

    Appendix 173
    Notes 183
    Bibliography 223
    Index 249

  • Charters, Samuel:
    The Roots of the Blues. An African Search.
    London: Quartet Books, 1981. 151 p.
    ISBN 0-7043-3416-X

    CONTENTS

      1. To The Gambia 1
      2. A Mandingo jali 10
      3. ‘I Can Tell You the History of Everything’ 23
      4. A River Place 34
      5. Toolongjong 47
      6. Some Young Griots 53
      7. Drums in the Streets 66
      8. A Meeting with Slavery 78
      9. ‘The Province of Freedom’ 96
    10. A Creole Village 110
    11. The African Blues Roots 119
    12. A Sense of Something Older 127
    13. The Bamako-Dakar International Express 137
    14. A Bridge over the Niger 146

    With photographs by the author

  • Agawu, V[ictor] Kofi:
    The African Imagination in Music.
    New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2016. 388 p.
    ISBN 978-0-19-026321-8 (pbk) 978-0-19-026320-1 (cloth)

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    About the Companion Website xi

    Introduction 1
    1. Music and/in Society 27
    2. Musical Instruments 65
    3. Language and/in Music 113
    4. The Rhythmic Imagination 155
    5. The Melodic Imagination 195
    6. The Formal Imagination 240
    7. Harmony, or Simultaneous Doing 267
    8. Appropriating African Music 305

    Discography 335
    Videography 343
    Bibliography 345
    Index 365

  • Agawu, [Victor] Kofi:
    Presenting African Music.
    Postcolonial Notes, Queries, Positions.

    New York, N.Y.: Routledge, 2003. 266 p.
    ISBN 0-415–94389-2 (paper) 0-415–94390-6 (bound)

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ix
    Introduction xi

    1. Colonialism’s Impact 1
    2. The Archive 23
    3. The Invention of “African Rhythm” 55
    4. Polymeter, Additive Rhythm, and Other Enduring Myths 71
    5. African Music as Text 97
    6. Popular Music Defended against Its Devotees 117
    7. Contesting Difference 151
    8. How Not to Analyze African Music 173
    9. The Ethics of Representation 199

    Epilogue 221
    Notes 225
    References 241
    Index 261

  • Fuhr, Jenny:
    Experiencing Rhythm : Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
    Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013. ix & 195 p.
    ISBN 978-1-4438-5057-6

    CONTENTS

    List of Illustrations viii
    Acknowledgements ix

    Chapter One
    Music in Contemporary Madagascar 1
    Introduction
    “Contemporary Malagasy Music” (Randrianary 2001):
       “6/8 rhythm” meets Lova-tsolina
    Fieldwork Experiences
    Outline

    Chapter Two 
    Theorising “Rhythm” 23
    Introduction
    What is “Rhythm”?
    The Concepts of “Metre” and “Measure” – Different
       Interpretations and Understandings
    Rhythm in African Music and the Invention of New Terms
    Rhythm in Culture and Language
    Malagasy Rhythin(s)

    Chapter Three 
    Musicking Researchers and Researching Musicians 47
    Introduction
    Key Terms
    The Idea of “Sell’ and “Other” within Ethnographic Fieldwork
    The Notion of “Experience”: “Narrativisation of Experiences”
       and “Musical being-in-the-world” (Titon 1997)
    The Importance of Integrating the Analysis of Discourses
       and Musical Practices
    “Towards a (more) Performative Ethnomusicology” (Baily 2008)
    Understanding Musically
    “Presumption of Sameness” (Agawu 2003) and
       “Subject-centred Ethnography” (Rice 2003)

    Chapter Four 
    Contesting the “6/8 Rhythm” 70
    Introduction
    The Importance of the Research Context
    The ”6/8 rhythm” as used in Western Musicology
    The Musicians’ Usage of the Term: Identification or
       Taking Distance? Terminological Confusion
    Example Salegy
    The Challenge of the International “World Music Market” and
       Musicians’ Individual Experiences: Perspectives and Strategies
    Conclusion

    Chapter Five
    Exploring the Lora-tsofina: Musicians’ Theories on the Origin and Meaning of “Rhythm” in Malagasy Music 99
    Introduction
    The Importance of Listening to the Musicians’
       Own Concepts
    The Topoi
    Environment
    Everyday Life
    Language
    Dance
    Influences From Outside
    Emotions and Spiritual Ideas
    Conclusion

    Chapter Six
    Experiencing “Rhythm” 143
    Introduction
    Composing and “Malagasising” Tunes
    Tapping Feet, Counting, and Clapping
    Intercultural Musical Encounters-Examples of
       Musicians’ Experiences
    Participating Musically Myself
    Examples
    The Importance of Lova-tsofina
    “6/8 rhythm” and the Opportunity of Binaries
       and Ternaries
    Engaging in “Malagasising” Music
    The importance of Language and Lyrics
    The Importance of the Instrument and its
       Playing Technique
    The Emphasis on Personality and Individuality
       in Malagasy Music
    Conclusion

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusion 178

    Bibliography 181
    Index 194

  • Johnson, John William:
    ‘Heelloy’. Modern Poetry and Songs of the Somalis.
    London: HAAN Publishing, 1998. xxiii & 241 p.
    ISBN 978-1-874-20981-2

    CONTENTS

    Foreword to the first edition by B. W. Andrzejewski ix
    Foreword to the 1996 edition by Abdilahi Qarshi xi
    Preface to the first edition xv
    Preface to the 1996 edition xxiii

    1. Introduction
    The social context 1
    The Nature of Traditional Pastoralist Poetry 12
    The Historical Development of Modern Oral Poetry 17

    2. The Family of Miniature Genres
    The Nature of the Family of Miniature Genres 27
    The Poetry of the Miniature Family 32

    3. The emergence of the Belwo
    The Historical Background 49
    The Belwo is Born 53
    The Poetry of the Belwo 59

    4. The Heello: Period One
    The Metamorphosis: Belwo to Heello A 75
    The Modem Poem: Heello A to Heello B 82

    5. The Heello: Period Two
    The Historical Background 95
    The Poetry of the Second Period 103

    6. The Heello: Period Three
    The Historical Background 117
    The Poetry of the Third Period 146

    7. Characteristics of the Heello: All Periods
    Themes Common to All Periods 175
    Structural Characteristics and
    Development Common to All Periods 190
    The Impact of Media on Modern Poetry 208

    8. Conclusion
    The Inheritance of the Heello 215
    Forces Behind the Success and Development of Modern Poetry 216

  • Fuhr, Jenny:
    Experiencing Rhythm : Contemporary Malagasy Music and Identity.
    Ph.D. University of Southampton, 2010. xv & 246 p.

    CONTENTS

    List of illustrations ix
    List of accompanying material xi
    Author’s declaration xiii
    Acknowledgements xv

    Section 1
    Introduction 1

    Section 2

    Chapter 2.1 
    Theorising ‘rhythm’
    Introduction 11
    Literature review 12
    “Contemporary Malagasy music” (Randrianary 2001) and
    the lova-tsofina 17
    The ‘6/8 rhythm’ and the role of rhythm in the musicians’
    search for identity 19
    Introduction: the concept of ‘rhythm’ 21
    The concepts of ‘metre’ and ‘measure’ – different interpretations
    and understandings 22
    Rhythm in African music and the invention of new terms 26
    Example: Discourse on rhythm in Cuban music 33
    Rhythm in culture and language 34
    Malagasy rhythm(s) 41

    Chapter 2.2
    Methodological reflections: integrating musical experiences into ethnomusicological research
    Introduction 47
    Key terms: Experiences and Self-Other dichotomy 49
    Theorising Fieldwork
        Historical reflections 50
        The idea of ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ within fieldwork 53
        Experiences: ‘narrativisation of experiences’ and
        “musical being-in-the-world” (Titon 1997) 54
        ‘New fieldwork’ in ethnomusicology 56
    The importance of integrating both, the analysis of discourses
    and musical practices 58
    “Towards a (more) performative ethnomusicology” (Baily 2008) 58
    Why there is a need to participate musically 59
    Understanding musically 62
    “Presumption of Sameness” (Agawu 2003) and “Subject-Centred Ethnography” (Rice 2003) 67

    Chapter 2.3
    Fieldwork experiences
    Introduction 73
    Development of my research 73
    The role of Antananarivo 76
    Some reflections on my fieldwork in Antananarivo 78
    Development of my musical practices 82
    The interrelation of analyses of discourses and musical
    experiences – Outlook: Section 3 87

    Section 3
    Introduction section 3 – Analyses 89

    Chapter 3.1
    Contesting the ‘6/8 rhythm’
    Introduction 91
    Speech about music / Language and identity 92
    The presence of the term ‘6/8 rhythm’ in the musicians’
    discourses 96
    The ‘6/8 rhythm’ as used in Western musicology 96
    ‘6/8 rhythm’ meets lova-tsofina 99
    The importance of the research context 99
    The term ‘6/8 rhythm’ in the Malagasy context 101
        The musicians’ usage of the term ‘6/8 rhythm’:
        identification or taking distance? 101
        Terminological confusion 108
        Example salegy 108
    The challenge of the international ‘world music market’ – musicians’ individual experiences: perspectives and strategies 113
    Conclusion 119

    Chapter 3.2
    Exploring the lova-tsofina: Musician’s theories on the origin and meaning of ‘rhythm’ in Malagasy music
    Introduction 121
    The importance of listening to the musicians’ own concepts 122
    The topoi 122
        Environment 124
        Everyday life 131
        Language 138
        Dance 143
        Influences from outside 146
        Emotions and spiritual ideas 148
    Conclusion155

    Chapter 3.3
    Experiencing Rhythm
    Introduction 157
    The musical experience of ‘rhythm’ 158
        Composing and ‘malagasising’ tunes 161
        Tapping feet, counting, and clapping 166
        Intercultural musical encounters – examples of musicians’ experiences 169
    Participating musically myself 173
    The interrelation of discourses and musical experiences 174
    Examples:
        The importance of the lova-tsofina 175
         ‘6/8 rhythm’ and the opportunity of binaries and ternaries 176
        Engaging in ‘malagasising’ music 179
        The importance of language and lyrics 182
        The importance of the instrument and its playing technique 184
        The emphasis on personality/individuality in Malagasy music 189
    Outlook / further research possibilities 194
    Conclusion 198

    Section 4
    Conclusion 201

    Appendices
    Appendix I
    English translations of interview quotes (section 3) 209
    Appendix II
    List of all interviews conducted 227

    Bibliography 231

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    Fela. Kalakuta Notes. 2nd edition
    Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2015.  xii & 326 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8195-7539-5 (paper) 978-0-8195-7540-1 (ebook)

    CONTENTS

    Foreword by Banning Eyre ix
    Introduction 1

    Part 1 Early Days
    1 The Birth of Afrobeat 27
    2 Joe Mensah Remembers 41
    3 Fela in Ghana 49
    4 Stan Plange Remembers 29

    Part 2 Confrontation
    5 Kalakuta is Born 67
    6 “JB” Talks about Fela 73
    7 The Kalakuta Republic 81
    8 The Black President 114
    9 Amsterdam and After 125

    Part 3 Retrospect
    10 Mac Tontoh on Fela 139
    11 Frank Talk about Fela 152
    12 Obiba Plays It Again 165
    13 Smart Binete Sorts It Out 174
    14 Anku Checks Out the Beat 178
    15 Nana Danso Orchestrates 183
    16 Some Early Afro-Fusion Pioneers 197
    17 Interview with Fela 204
    18 Afterthoughts and Updates 209
    19. Felabrations at Home and Abroad 238

    Chronology 259
    Notes 269
    Selected Bibliography 281
    Discography 285
    Appendix A: “Shuffering and Shmiling” Score 303
    Index 309

  • Erlmann, Veit (ed.):
    Populäre Musik in Afrika.

    Veröffentlichungen des Museum für Völkerkunde.
    Neue Folge 53. Abteilung Musikethnologie VIII.
    Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde, 1991. 312 pp. & 2 CDs.
    ISBN 3-88609-213-5

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  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

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  • Sweeney, Philip:
    Directory of World Music. A Guide to Performers and their Music.
    With Contributions from Peter Gabriel, Andy Kershaw, Giberto Gil [&] Manu Dibango.
    London: Virgin Books, 1991. 262 p.
    Section Africa 1-81
    ISBN 0-86369-378-4

    sweeney1991CONTENTS

    AFRICA

    The North and West
    Introduction: Peter Gabriel 1
    Libya 3
    Tunisia 5
    Algeria 6
    Morocco 13
    Mauritania 16
    Senegal 17
    Mali 20
    Guinea 26
    Guinea-Bissau 29
    Cape Verde 29
    Sierra Leone 31
    Côte d’Ivoire 32
    Ghana 34
    Togo and Benin 36
    Nigeria 37

    Central Africa, The South and East
    Introduction: Manu Dibango 42
    Cameroon 44
    Zaire 49
    Congo 56
    Gabon 56
    Angola 57
    Zambia 58
    Mozambique 59
    Zimbabwe 60
    South Africa 65
    Madagascar 70
    Mauritius and Reunion 71
    Tanzania and Zanzibar 72
    Kenya 74
    Uganda 76
    Burundi 76
    Ethiopia 77
    Sudan 79

  • Lee, Hélène:
    Rockers d’Afrique. Stars et légendes du rock mandinque.
    Paris: Albin Michel, 1988. 223 pp.
    ISBN 2-226-03 139-1 

    TABLE DE MATIÈRESafropop1995

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