| Southern Africa general (2 or more countries) | Books | Articles |

| BotswanaLesothoMalaŵiMoçambiqueNamibia South AfricaSwazilandZambiaZimbabwe |

> Zimbabwe | Books | Dissertations | Articles |

See as well / Voir aussi / Veja também “Africa general – Books”

Banda, Jane:
Zimbabwean Copyright Law and its Effectiveness in
Protecting Composers’ Intellectual Property Rights.
B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2012. ix & 48 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 984 KB

Bere, Wonderful G.:
Urban Grooves:
The Performance of Politics in Zimbabwe’s Hip Hop Music.
Ph.D. New York University, 2008. xiii & 229 p.
Contents PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.78 MB

Brusila, Johannes:
Musikindustrin i Zimbabwe – en analys av fonogramindustrins och
musikradions filtreringsprocesser i ett afrikanskt land.
[The Music Industry in Zimbabwe – An Analysis of the Phonogram Industry’s
and the Music Radio’s Filtration Processes in an African Country].
Licentiatavhandling [Ph.D]. Helsingfors Universitet, 1995.

Chamisa, Vimbai:
Commodified Versions of Shona Indigenous Music:
(Re)constructing Tradition in Zimbabwean Popular Music.
M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2012. viii & 128 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 2.14 MB

Chari, Salome:
An investigation into the Marketing and Promotion of Female Artists in Zimbabwe:
A case of Fungisai Zvakavapano and Chiwoniso Maraire.
B.Sc. Midlands State Univeristy (Gweru). 2007.

Chihora, Tinomutenda:
The Use of Vulgar Lyrics by Zimdancehall Artists in Some of their Songs:
A Survey Carried Out in Gweru, Midlands, Zimbabwe.
B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2016. 53 p.
Contents – PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 824 KB

Chikowero, Moses {Mhoze}:
An Examination of the Zimbabwe Music Industry,
with Special Reference to Popular African Music, 1965–1985.
M.A. University of Zimbabwe (Harare), 2001.

Chikowero, Moses {Mhoze}:
Struggles over Culture: Zimbabwean Music and Power, 1930s-2007.
Ph.D. Dalhousie University (Halifax, Canada), 2008. xi & 419 p.
ProQuest no. NR43925

Groves, Ryan Dale:
Popular Music and Identity in Southern Rhodesia, 1930-1960.
Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2015. xiii & 249 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.25 MB

Hollenstein, Markus:
Stella Rambisai Chiweshe – The Queen of Mbira.   
M. Phil. Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften, Universität Wien, 2012. 120 p.
InhaltPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 13.4 MB

Impey, Angela M.:
They Want us with Salt and Onions: Women in the Zimbabwean Music Industry.
Ph.D. Indiana University (Bloomington, Ind.), 1992. 256 p.
ProQuest no. 9310214

Kabwato, Chris:
The Emergence of Youth Protest Music and Arts as
Alternative Media in Zimbabwe: A Gramscian Analysis.

M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2016. 100 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 10.7 MB

Kalumbu, Jr., Isaac Gabriel:
The Process of Creation and Production of Popular Music in Zimbabwe.
Ph.D. Indiana University (Bloomington, Ind.), 1999, 212 p.
ProQuest no. 9950804

Kyker, Jennifer W.:
A Person among Others: Music, Morality and
Postcolonial Politics in the Songs of Oliver Mtukudzi.

Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Penn.); 2011. 199 p.
ProQuest no. 3462166

Makunganya, Abraham:
Zimbabwean Societal Perceptions of the Depiction of Women in Matavire’s Two Love Songs.
B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2015. viii & 50 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 688 KB

Mangoma, T. P.:
Imitation or Innovation. The Global in the Local:
A Study of Local Music in Zimbabwe since 2001.

B.Sc. Midlands State Univeristy (Gweru), 2004.

Mhiripiri, Joyce:
The Potential of the Music Industry to Generate Personal
Wealth and Contribute to National Development.

M.A. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2004.

Moyo, Nomusa:
“I will not speak”: The Socio-Political in the Music of Albert Nyathi.
M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2008. v & 74 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 4.59 MB

Mudzanire, Benjamin:
An Interrogation of the Context Referentiality of Postcolonial Shona
Popular Music in Zimbabwe:
A Search for the Contemporary Leitmotifs.
Ph.D. University of South Africa (Pretoria), 2016. xii & 380 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 2.03 MB

Mukombahasha, Moses:
An Examination of the Zimbabwe Music Industry, 1965-1985.
B.A. University of Zimbabwe (Harare), 2001.

Musiyiwa, Mickias:
The Narrativization of Post-2000 Zimbabwe in the
Shona Popular Song-Genre: An Appraisal Approach.

Ph.D. University of Stellenbosch (Stellenbosch), 2013. xii & 413 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 7.04 MB

Muzari, G.:
Zimbabwean Music Industry in Transition:
A Study of the Rise and Characteristics of Urban Grooves Music.

B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2005.

Ndanjeyi, Prisca:
Threat(s) Posed by Piracy to the Music Industry in Zimbabwe:
A Case Study of Alick Macheso and Madiz.

B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2009.

Souza, E.:
Critical Success Factors in the Zimbabwe Music Industry:
The Musical Careers of Oliver Mtukudzi and Alick Macheso.
M.Sc. Midland State University (Gweru), 2007.

Viriri, Agnella:
Female Participation in the Post-Independence Zimbabwean Popular Music Industry:
A Case Study of Edith Katiji (Weutonga) and Sandra Ndebele.
M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2014. viii & 127 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 16.60 MB

Williams, Linda F.:
The Impact of African-American Music on Jazz in Zimbabwe:
An Exploration in Radical Empiricism.

Ph.D. Indiana University (Bloomington, Ind.), 1995. xi & 259 p.
ProQuest no. 9608609

Page created 02/09/2017 © afrobib.com

  • Banda, Jane:
    Zimbabwean Copyright Law and its Effectiveness in
    Protecting Composers’ Intellectual Property Rights.

    B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2012. ix & 48 p.

    CONTENTS

    Contents i
    Approval Form iii
    Abstract iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Dedication vi
    List of Tables vii
    List of Figures viii
    Acronyms ix

    Chapter 1
    1.0 Introduction 1
    1.1 Background to the problem 1
    1.2 Statement of the problem 4
    1.3 Objectives 5
    1.4 Research questions 5
    1.5 Significance of the study 6
    1.6 Assumptions 6
    1.7 Limitations 7
    1.8 Delimitations 7
    1.9 Definition of terms 8
    1.10 Conclusions 8

    Chapter 2
    2.0 Literature review 9
    2.1 Introduction 9
    2.2 Who music composers are 9
    2.3 Copyright law and intellectual property rights 10
    2.4 History and development of Copyright Law 12
    2.5 Who owns copyright in a musical work 12
    2.6 The Collecting Society in Zimbabwe 13
    2.7 Duration of Copyright 14
    2.8 How composers have benefited from copyright law 15
    2.9 Rights protected by copyright law 15
       2.9.1 Economic rights 16
       2.9.2 Moral rights 16
       2.9.3 Mechanical rights 17
       2.9.4 Performing rights 17
    2.10 Copyright Infringement 17
    2.11 Piracy 19
    2.12 Conclusion 23

    Chapter 3
    3.0 Methodology and research design 24
    3.1 Introduction 24
    3.2 Research design 24
    3.3 Population, sample and sampling procedure 25
    3.4 Research instruments 25
        3.4.1 Questionnaires 25
        3.4.2 Interviews 27
    3.5 Data collection procedure 27
    3.6 Data presentation, analysis and interpretation 29
    3.7 Conclusion 29

    Chapter 4
    4.0 Data presentation, analysis and interpretation 30
    4.1 Introduction 30
    4.2 Responses 30
    4.3 Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    5.0 Summary, conclusions and recommendations 41
    5.1 Introduction 41
    5.2 Summary of the results 41
    5.3 Conclusion of findings 42
    5.4 Recommendations 43
    5.5 Conclusion 44

    References 45

    Appendix 1 46
    Appendix 2 47
    Appendix 3 48
    Department Letter 49
    Release Form 50

  • Bere, Wonderful G.:
    Urban Grooves:
    The Performance of Politics in Zimbabwe’s Hip Hop Music.
    Ph.D. New York University, 2008. xiii & 229 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Abstract viii
    List of tables 13

    Introduction 1

    Chapter I
    Back to the same: from great Zimbabwe to Zimbabwe ruins 17
    Causes of the Zimbabwean crisis 20
    The land question 20
    Balancing act: Social justice and economic progress 25
    ESAP 26
    War veterans 27
    The civic community 28
    Land invasions: The third chimurenga 29
    Rigged elections 31
    Breakdown of the rule of law 32

    Chapter II
    Music, society and politics 36
    Marxism and the arts 37
    Music and social memory 41
    Chimurenga music 43
    Post-independence protest music 51
    Post-independence chimurenga music 53
    Music serving the state 57

    Chapter III
    Censorship in Zimbabwean music 61
    Censorship legislation 66
    Censorship and Entertainment Control Act, 1967 67
    Blacklisting of music on radio and television 73
    Harassment and intimidation of musicians 74
    Self-censorship 77
    Co-option of musicians and take-overs of recording companies 78
    Recording industry censorship 80

    Chapter IV
    Towards a genealogy of urban grooves 82
    From worldbeat to localbeat: Hip Hop to urban grooves 82
    Defining urban grooves 94
    Its grooving time: Urban youth culture takes center stage 96
    The pre-urban grooves movement 100
    Government intervention and the 75 percent local content policy 115
    The Capital Radio saga 116
    The B.S.A 116
    “Urban Grooves Volume 1”: Urban grooves arrives 118
    Issues in urban grooves 120

    Chapter V
    Infectious beats: State politicization of urban grooves 124
    State sponsorship of urban grooves 131

    Chapter VI
    Deception, dissonance and subversion in urban grooves 146
    Urban grooves or urban blues: Love, migration and the blues in the grooves 159
    Laughter as medicine: Xtra large 171
    Social dissonance as political protest: Maskiri 176
    Disowning urban grooves 184
    Toyi Toyi Hip Hop: Performance as activism 185

    Conclusion
    The sound of mourning 190
    Endnotes 198

    Bibliography 204

  • Chamisa, Vimbai:
    Commodified Versions of Shona Indigenous Music:
    (Re)constructing Tradition in Zimbabwean Popular Music.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2012. viii & 128 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Dedication iii
    Abstract iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Contents vi
    List of Figures viii

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1
    Musical Traditions and Historical Processes 4
    Influences in the Popular Music 7
    Research Aim and Rationale 9
    Research Objectives 10
    Research Methods and Procedures 11
    Classifying the Repertoire 16
    The Socio-political Significance 18
    Chapter Summaries 19

    Chapter Two
    Literature Review and Theoretical Framework 21
    Introduction 21
    Towards Understanding Shona Popular Adaptations
    as “Traditional” Art 21
    Authenticity and Identity in Music 25
    Adaptation of Traditional Music and Copyright 28
    Structural Analysis 32

    Chapter Three
    “Doing the Serious Business of Older People Correctly”:
    Zimbabwean Mbira Popular Adaptations 36
    Introduction 36
    Historical Background to the Performance of Mbira Indigenous Music 37
    Strategies for Adapting Mbira Traditional Music 39
        Imitation: Entire Mbira Adaptation 40
        Sampling: Adapting the Standard Basic Mbira Part: Imitation 44
        Abstract Adaptation: Adapting Sung Mbira Melody and or Text 52
    Connection between Popular Texts and Traditional Mbira Pieces 59
    Conclusion 62

    Chapter Four
    Impacts of Shona Ngoma Rhythms on Zimbabwean Popular Music 66
    Introduction 66
    Understanding Ngoma Rhythms 67
    Combining Technique: Interpreting Connections between Shona Ngoma Genres 69
    Traditional and Popular Manifestations 74
    Imitation: Entire ngoma adaptations 75
    Sampling of Shona ngoma music 76
    Jiti Popular music: Relationship between Musical Style and Lyrics 84
    Conclusion 88

    Chapter Five
    Commodified Shona Music: Safeguarding Indigenous Musical heritage? Local Community Perspectives 92
    Introduction 92
    Preservation through Adaptation 95
    Traditional Music and the Heritage Discourse in Zimbabwe 96
    Community Members and their Relationships to Shona Traditional Music 98
    Hearing Popular Adaptations as Nhaka 102
    Discussions of the Traditional 107
    Conclusion 109

    Chapter Six
    Conclusions 110

    Appendix
     A List of Commodified Shona Songs 115

    Bibliography 121
    Discography 128

  • Chihora, Tinomutenda:
    The Use of Vulgar Lyrics by Zimdancehall Artists in Some of their Songs: A Survey Carried Out in Gweru, Midlands, Zimbabwe.
    B.S. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2016. 53 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Supervisor’s Approval form ii
    Dedication iii
    Acknowledgements iv
    Abstract v

    Chapter 1
    1.0 Introduction 1
    1.1 Background of the study 1
    1.2 Statement of the problem 2
    1.3 Research questions 3
    1.4 Significance of study 3
    1.5 Limitations 4
    1.6 Delimitations 4
    1.7 Functional definition of terms 5
    1.8 Conclusion 5

    Chapter 2
    2.0 Literature review 6
    2.1 Introduction 6
    2.2 The historical background of Zimdancehall 6
    2.2.1 Zimdancehall defined 6
    2.2.2 The origin and development of Zimdancehall 6
    2.3 The role of text in a song 8
    2.4 The Impact of Technology on Music Production,
           Marketing, Performance and Distribution 13
    2.5 The role of music censorship in Zimbabwe in
           view of vulgar lyrics 14
    2.6 The marketing of music in Zimbabwe today 15
    2.7 The context in which Zimdancehall is performed 15
    2.8 Conclusion 16

    Chapter 3
    3.0 research methodology 17
    3.1 Introduction 17
    3.2 Research Design 17
    3.2.1 Research Approach 17
    3.3 Research Population 18
    3.4 The Sampling Procedures 18
    3.5 Research Instruments 19
       3.5.1 Interviews 19
       3.5.1.1 Advantages of interviews 19
       3.5.1.2 Disadvantages of interviews 20
    3.6 Data collection Procedures 20
    3.7 Data analysis 20
    3.8 Ethical considerations 20
    3.9 Conclusion 21

    Chapter 4
    4.0 Data presentation, interpretation and analysis 22
    4.1 Introduction 22
    4.2 Data Presentation 22
       4.2.2 Summary of reasons given by the interviewees
                on the use vulgar lyrics by Zimdancehall in Gweru 23
    4.3 Data interpretation and analysis 26
       4.3.1 Zimdancehall and its origins 26
       4.3.2 Zimdancehall artists, their lifestyle
                and needs 27
       4.3.3 Zimdancehall production and marketing
              procedures 32
    4.4 Conclusion 36

    Chapter 5
    5.0 Summary, conclusions and recommendations 37
    5.1 Introduction 37
    5.2 Summary of the Research 37
    5.3 Conclusions 37
    5.4 Recommendations 39

    References 41

    Appendices 45
    Interview guide for Zimdancehall artists I
    Interview guide for Zimdancehall producers II
    Interview guide for arts organization III
    Interview guide for pastors, church elders and youth IV
    Interview guide for music critics V
    Introductory letter

  • Groves, Ryan Dale:
    Popular Music and Identity in Southern Rhodesia, 1930-1960.
    Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2015. xiii & 249 p.

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures xi

    Introduction 1
    How We Understand African Music 5
    Disciplinary Examinations of African Music 13
    Theoretical Problems of African Music 21
    Where Does This Study Fit In? 34

    Chapter 1
    Setting the Stage 39
    South-Central African History, c 1800-1890 42
    Don’t Tell Them Jesus Loves Them 51
    Bibles and Bazookas: Capitalizing on Christianity 60
    The Man in the Long Black Coat 65
    A House Done Built Without Hands 82

    Chapter 2
    The Changing Nature of African Music 101
    Indigenous Music on the Eve of Colonization 102
    Western Music Enters the Fray 108
    Orpheus McAdoo and the Irony of Minstrality 112
    Musical Values in African Christianity 117
    The Storm without the Music: Musical Ethics in
    Southern Rhodesia 125
    African Hymnody: A Case Study in Cultural Imperialism 129
    Night Singing and Rising Cultural Protest 143

    Chapter 3
    African Popular Music Enters the City 155
    Expressions of Indigenous Culture in Early Salisbury 162
    Increased State Control over African Cultural Production
    and Consumption 170
    Township Jazz in All its Iterations 178
    Masiganda: Singer-Songwriters in Africa 185
    The Commodification of African Music 202

    Chapter 4
    New Ethics through Music 210
    Black, Brown, and Beige: A Portrait of the African Middle Class 219
    Education and African Culture 223
    Reactions by the African Middle Class 231

    Conclusion 234

    Bibliography 240

  • Hollenstein, Markus:
    Stella Rambisai Chiweshe – The Queen of Mbira.    
    M.Phil. Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften, Universität Wien, 2012. 120 p.

    INHALT

    Vorwort 1
    Stella Chiweshe – Through Mbira 3
    1. Through Mbira – Einleitung zum Thema 4
    2.1 Die Reise beginnt – Die Erforschung des
          Forschungsfeldes 8
    2.2 Ambuya erzählt – Das narrativ-biographische 
          Interview 14
    2.3 Felder explodieren – Datenerhebung 17
    2.4 Das Schlaue Buch – Literaturrecherche 19
    2.5 Fluch oder Segen – Informationen aus dem
          World Wide Web 21
    2.6 Mbira-Musk in Theorie und Praxis – Methodik 
          zur Notation 24
    3. Der Rote Faden – Fragestellung 32
    4.1 Das Mädchen mit der Trommel in der Brust – Rambisai 35
    4.2 Rinderhüten mit Folgen – über den Ersten Chimurenga 45
    4.3 Der Umzug nach Bindura – Mapira 57
    5.1 Die Mbira-Lektion von Sekuru Flavian Mavetu –
          Engendering Mbira 68
    5.2 Das Zappeln geht weiter – vom Zweiten Chimurenga 78
    5.3 Kassahwa – die Entstehung eines Hits 84
    6.1 Meerjungfrau und Wassermann – Njuzu & Njuvi 91
    6.2 Die Heimkehr – Stella Chiweshe begegnet mwari 
          musikavanhu 100
    6.3 Ambuya Chiweshes Aufgabe ist vollendet –
          Ausblicke 104
    7. The Queen of Mbira – Schlussfolgerung 106
    8. Der Traum, ein Leben – Nachwort 108
    9. Quellenverzeichnis 109
    Anhang

  • Kabwato, Chris:
    The Emergence of Youth Protest Music and Arts as
    Alternative Media in Zimbabwe: A Gramscian Analysis.

    M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2016. 100 p.

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 2
    Abstract3

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 General background of the study: a personal note 6
    1.2 Objectives of the study 8
    1.3 Significance of the study 8
    1.4 Thesis outline 10

    Chapter 2
    Locating the Magamba Network in the media
    landscape of Zimbabwe

    2.1 Introduction 12
    2.2 The context of the media laws and the implications for
           democratic participation 13
    2.3 The media regulatory environment 16
      2.3.1 Access to Information and Protection of
               Privacy Act (AIPPA) 18
      2.3.2 The Criminal Law Codification Act (Chapter 9:23) 19
    2.4 The broadcasting regulatory environment 20
    2.5 Diasporic media 24

    Chapter 3
    Theories and perspectives on the public sphere,
    hegemony and popular culture

    3.1 Introduction 28
    3.2 The public sphere 28
    3.3 Hegemony31
    3.4 Popular culture 36
    3.5 Critical appropriation 39
    3.6 The struggle over language 42
    3.7 Media and Internet – spaces of engagement 43

    Chapter 4
    Research methodology and data analysis procedures
    4.1 Introduction 46
    4.2 Qualitative research methodology 46
    4.3 Qualitative content analysis 48
    4.4 The Qualitative interview 54
    4.5 The Interview guide 55
    4.6 Sampling 55
    4.7 Ethical concerns 56
    4.8 Recording the interview 57
    4.9 Observation 58

    Chapter 5
    Presentation and analysis of findings
    5.1 Introduction 60
    5.2 Freedom of expression and creative spaces 62
    5.3 Hegemonic discourses – contesting narratives of
          patriotism and sovereignty 67
    5.4 The politics of identity and critical appropriation (music,
          language and symbols) at both global and local levels 73
    5.5 Organic intellectuals and the quest for democracy and
          social justice 79

    Chapter 6
    Conclusion
    6.1 Introduction 85
    6.2 Summary 86
    6.3 Scope for further research 87

    Appendix A 88

  • Makunganya, Abraham:
    Zimbabwean Societal Perceptions of the Depiction
    of Women in Matavire’s Two Love Songs.

    B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2015. viii & 50 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Certificate of Supervision ii
    Acknowledgements iii
    Dedications iv
    Abstract v

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 Introduction 1
    1.2 Background to the study 1
    1.3 Statement of the problem 4
    1.4 Aim 5
    1.5 Objectives 5
    1.6 Assumptions 5
    1.7 Research questions 6
    1.8 Significance of the study 6
    1.9 Delimitations 7
    1.10 Limitations 7
    1.11 Definition of terms 7
    1.12 Conclusion 9

    Chapter 2
    Literature review
    2.0 Introduction 10
    2.1 Biography of Paul Matavire 10
    2.2 The effect of gender construct as a source
         of Music lyrical content 12
    2.3 Images of women in popular music 14
    2.4 Women and popular music at international level 15
    2.4 Mysogyn in Rap/Hip Hop music 16
    2.6 Women and popular music at regional level 17
    2.7 Women and popular music in Zimbabwe 18
    2.8 Observations on women and popular music in Zimbabwe 19
    2.9 Summary20

    Chapter 3
    Methodology
    3.1 Introduction 22
    3.2 Research Design 22
    3.3 Theoretical Framework 23
    3.4 Population 24
    3.5 Sampling 24
    3.6 Stratified random sampling 25
    3.7 Methods of collecting data 25
    3.8 Data presentation and analysis 27
    3.9 Qualitative context analysis 28
    3.10 Conclusion 29

    Chapter 4
    Presentation, analysis and interpretation of data findings
    4.1 Introduction 30
    4.2 Do you like listening to Matavire’s love songs? 30
    4.3 Songs that Matavire is remembered for 31
    4.4 The issues raised in the two selected songs 32
    4.5 Who initiates the “Love Talk” in the episodes? 33
    4.6 How are women is depicted in Matavire’s two songs 4
    4.7 Lessons drawn from the songs 35
    4.8 Discussion of findings 38
    4.9 The role of musicians in redressing gender imbalances 39
    4.10 Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations
    5.1 Introduction 42
    5.2 Summary 42
    5.3 Conclusions drawn 43
    5.4 Recommendations 43
    5.5 Conclusion 44

    References 45

    Appendix 1: Questionnaire 47
    Appendix 2: Interview Schedule 50

  • Moyo, Nomusa:
    “I will not speak”: The Socio-Political in the Music of Albert Nyathi.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2008. v & 74 p.

    CONTENTS

    Title i
    Abstract ii
    Declaration iii
    Acknowledgements iv
    Table of contents v

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1
    Chapter Two
    Literature review 12
    Chapter Three
    Of speech and silence: Claiming the right to speak 20
    Chapter Four
    Disillusionment with independence 46
    Chapter Five
    Conclusion 66

    Bibliography 68

  • Mudzanire, Benjamin:
    An Interrogation of the Context Referentiality of Postcolonial Shona
    Popular Music in Zimbabwe: A Search for the Contemporary Leitmotifs.

    Ph.D. University of South Africa (Pretoria), 2016. xii & 380 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Dedication ii
    Acknowledgements iii
    Abstract iv
    Key words v
    List of tables xii

    Chapter 1
    Introduction 1
    1.0 Preamble 1
    1.1 Background 2
      1.1.1 Pre-colonial Shona music and social context 2
      1.1.2 Shona music during the colonial period 6
      1.1.3 The postcolonial period 10
    1.2 Towards a working definition of popular music 11
    1.3 Statement of problem 12
    1.4 Aim of the research 13
      1.4.1 Objectives 13
      1.4.2 Research questions 14
    1.5 Justification 14
    1.6 Key words 17
    1.7 Scope of study 18
    1.8 Conclusion 19

    Chapter 2
    Literature review 21
    2.0 Introduction 21
    2.1 The nature of music 21
      2.1.1 Music as communication 25
      2.2.0 Language and music 28
      2.2.1 Music as literature 29
    2.3 The use of figurative language in music 32
    2.4 Music appreciation 34
    2.5 The role of music in society 36
      2.5.1 Global trends in music and socio-political context 37
      2.5.2 Regional trends in music and socio-political context 42
    2.6 Music in colonial Zimbabwe 46
    2.7 Postcolonial music literature in Zimbabwe 48
    2.8 Music censorship and freedom of expression 52
      2.8.1 Freedom of expression 53
      2.8.2 Music censorship 54
      2.8.3 Agents of music censorship 60
    2.9 Conclusion 63

    Chapter 3
    Theoretical framework 64
    3.0 Introduction 64
    3.1 The sociological approach 65
      3.1.1 New historicism 67
      3.1.2 Marxism and popular music 75
      3.1.3 Afrocentricity 78
      3.1.4 Africana womanism 81
    3.2 Conclusion 84

    Chapter 4
    Research methodology 85
    4.0 Introduction 85
    4.1 The qualitative research paradigm 85
      4.1.1 Research design 87
      4.1.2 Hermeneutics 88
        4.1.2.1 Characteristics of hermeneutics 89
        4.1.2.2 Basic hermeneutic questions and authorial 
                    assumptions 99
        4.1.2.2.1 Precautionary authorial assumptions 99
        4.1.2.3 Hermeneutics and qualitative research 105
      4.1.3 Data gathering techniques 106
        4.1.3.1 Interviews 106
        4.1.3.1.1 Advantages of interviews 107
        4.1.3.1.2 A cautionary note on interviews 108
        4.1.3.2 Document analysis 109
        4.1.3.2.1 Merits 110
        4.1.3.2.2 Cautionary points 111
        4.1.3.3 Choosing research subjects 111
        4.1.3.3.1 Judge mental sampling method 111
        4.1.3.3.1.1 Advantages of purposive sampling 112
        4.1.3.3.1.2 Cautionary points 113
        4.1.3.3.2 Sampling of music critics 113
        4.1.3.3.3 Sampling of music 113
        4.1.3.3.4 Sampling of music consumers 113
        4.1.3.4 Transcription of music 114
        4.1.3.5 Translation of music 114
      4.1.4 Data presentation and analysis 115
      4.1.5 Ethical considerations 116
    4.2 Conclusion 118

    Chapter 5
    Legal and political motifs 119
    5.0 Introduction 119
    5.1 Analysis of legal documents 120
      5.1.1 Legislation 120
        5.1.1.1 Freedom of expression 120
        5.1.1.2 The Censorship and Entertainments 
                    Control Act [Chapter 10:04] 123
        5.1.1.3 Broadcasting Services Act 128
        5.1.1.4 The 75% Local Content regulation 130
    5.2 Analysis of songs with a political motif 132
      5.2.1 Independence euphoria 133
      5.2.2 War memories 140
      5.2.3 The call for unity 144
      5.2.4 Exploitation of the subaltern 151
      5.2.5 The land question 160
      5.2.6 Corruption 171
      5.2.7 Political violence 176
      5.2.8 Political polarisation 187
    5.3 Analysis of Interviews 194
      5.3.1 Profile of interviewees 195
      5.3.2 Interviewee responses 197
        5.3.2.1 Freedom of expression 197
        5.3.2.2 Censorship 201
        5.3.2.3 Reflections on independence 206
        5.3.2.4 War memories 209
        5.3.2.5 National unity 210
      5.3.6 Exploitation of the subaltern 211
      5.3.7 Politcal party music 212
    5.3 Conclusion 213

    Chapter 6
    Socio-economic leitmotifs in Shona music 215
    6.0 Introduction 215
    6.1 Analysis of songs with a socio-economic motif 215
      6.1.1 Culture 215
      6.1.2 The concept of unhu/ubuntu 223
      6.1.3 Romantic expressions 227
      6.1.4 Domestic violence 234
      6.1.5 Divorce 241
      6.1.6 The HIV/AIDS conundrum 245
      6.1.7 Gender issues 251
      6.1.8 Poverty 262
      6.1.9 Escaping home:
               Diasporan discourses in popular music 270
    6.2 Analysis of Interviews 279
      6.2.1 Music and culture 280
      6.2.2 Marriage and family issues 282
      6.2.3 Romantic expressions 284
      6.2.4 Gender 286
      6.2.5 Economic issues 288
      6.2.6 Diasporan discourses 290
    6.3 Conclusion 294

    Chapter 7
    Discussion 295
    7.0 Introduction 295
    7.1 The creative environment of music 295
      7.1.1 The escape route 300
    7. 2 Political motifs 302
      7.2.1 Sustaining nationalist meta-narratives 302
        7.2.1.1 Immediate post-independence reflections 303
      7.2.2 Counter-narrating the vision of the state 307
        7.2.2.1 Land 308
        7.2.2.2 Corruption 309
        7.2.2.3 Political violence 310
        7.2.2.4 Political polarisation 312
    7.3 Socio-economic issues 313
      7.3.1 Culture 314
      7.3.2 Romantic expressions 315
      7.3.3 Domestic violence and divorce 317
      7.3.4 The HIV and AIDS pandemic 319
      7.3.5 Gender 320
      7.3.6 Poverty 323
      7.3.7 Escaping home: diasporan discourses in popular music 326
    7.4 Conclusion 328

    Chapter 8
    Conclusion 329
    8.0 Introduction 329
    8.1 Research findings 329
    8.2 Recommendations of the study 335

    References 337

    Appendices 373
    Appendix A: Music critics 373
    Appendix B: Artiste Interview 374
    Appendix C: Interview guide: music listeners 375
    Appendix D: Interviews with diasporans 377
    Appendix E: Curriculum Vitae for Mudzanire Benjamin 378

  • Musiyiwa, Mickias:
    The Narrativization of Post-2000 Zimbabwe in the
    Shona Popular Song-Genre: An Appraisal Approach.

    Ph.D. University of Stellenbosch (Stellenbosch), 2013. xii & 413 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Abstract iii
    Opsomming v
    Acknowledgements vii
    List of abbreviations and acronyms xii

    Chapter One
     Introduction to the study
    1.1 Introduction 1
    1.2 Background to the study 1
    1.3 Literature review 4
    1.4 The Nature and purpose of the study 11
       1.4.1 Theoretical approach 11
       1.4.2 Research questions 14
    1.5 Research methodology 14
    1.6 Organization of the study 17

    Chapter Two
    The typology of the Shona popular song-genre
    2.1 Introduction 18
    2.2 Classification of songs 19
       2.2.1 Problems in Oral Literary
                Classification of Songs 20
    2.3 The appraisal framework 22
    2.4 A Genre-based typology of the shona
              popular songs 24
       2.4.1 The genre theory 25
       2.4.2 The multi-rhetoricality of popular songs 50
    2.5 The intertextuality of the Shona popular song 51
       2.5.1 Forms of intertextuality in Shona 
                popular songs 53
       2.5.2 L+R format 54
       2.5.3 Song revivals 56
       2.5.4 Appropriation of other songs’ tunes 56
       2.5.5 Dialogical level 57
       2.5.6 Incorporative level 58
       2.5.7 Monologism 61
       2.5.8 Repetition 63
    2.6 Conclusion 64

    Chapter Three
    The tripartite classification of Zimbabwean
    popular songs into clusters

    3.1 Introduction 65
    3.2 The “small voices in history” and
           “small stories” frameworks 66
       3.2.1 Guha’s “small voices in history” framework 67
       3.2.2 Georgakopoulou’s “small stories” theory 70
    3.3 The “rediscovery of the ordinary” theory 72
    3.4 Key features of state hegemony in Zimbabwe 73
    3.5 A tripartite classification of popular songs 
          into clusters 81
       3.5.1 Grand narrative songs 82
       3.5.2 Small voices/stories songs 82
       3.5.3 Songs of ordinary life 82
    3.6 Factors shaping notions of grand and small
          voices songs 83
       3.6.1 Grand narrative song factors 84
       3.6.2 Small voices song factors 93
    3.7 Conclusion 97

    Chapter Four
    GNS and SSS’ contestations over meanings
    of land and history

    4.1 Introduction 98
    4.2 The themes of land and history 99
    4.3 The Chimurenga grand narrative as experiential
           basis for land metaphors 100
    4.4 Ivhu = vadzimu metaphor 103
       4.4.1 National vadzimu as guardians for all 112
       4.4.2 Land = Nhoroondo (History) metaphor 119
       4.4.3 Land = Ropa remagamba (Blood of fallen heroes) 124
    4.5 Conclusion 134

    Chapter Five
    Identity construction as evaluation of political
    behavior in SSS and GNS

    5.1 Introduction 135
    5.2 Mapping identity construction onto the appraisal
           theory 136
        5.2.1 Attitude’s dimensions of judgement and 
                 appreciation 136
        5.2.2 Political and national identities 138
    5.3 GNS songs and Zanu-PF identities of
          self-construction 140
        5.3.1 The identity of kurwira rusununguko 142
    5.4 Countering Zanu-PF’S positive identities in SSS 156
       5.4.1 The mudzvanyiriri identity 158
       5.4.2 The vaurayi venyika (national destroyers)
                 identity 160
       5.4.3 The identity of uori (corruption) 163
       5.4.4 The identity of jambanja (violence and
                 lawlessness) 168
       5.4.5 Zanu-PF and the kuguma (eschatology)
                identity 175
    5.5 Mutengesi identity as basis for opposition
          persecution  177
       5.5.1 The nationalist origins of the mutengesi
                 identity 177
       5.5.2 State usage of mutengesi identity
                in post-2000 179
    5.6 SSS and MDC identities of self-construction 187
       5.6.1 The opposition and the identity of bumbiro
                 remutemo (constitutionalism) 188
       5.6.2 The rwendo rwechinja (journey of change)
                 identity 191
       5.6.3 The MDC and the identity of economic 
                 recovery 192
    5.7 Conclusion 195

    Chapter Six
    The evaluation of ordinary life through social and
    religious identities in sol

    6.1 Introduction 196
    6.2 Njabulo Ndebele’s the rediscovery of the 
          ordinary theory 196
    6.3 Religious identities 201
       6.3.1 The mufudzi/muchengeti (shepherd/keeper)
                 identity 204
       6.3.2 Mutendi (believer) identity and
                 transcendentalist imagination 209
       6.3.3 Mutadzi identity as quest for 
                 individual liberation 224
       6.3.4 The kuguma (escatology) identity as
                 dramatic representation 230
    6.4 Social identities 240
       6.4.1 The umai (motherhood) and ubaba 
                 (fatherhood) identities 241
    6.5 Conclusion 271

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusions and recommendations
    7.1 Introduction 272
    7.2 The relevance of the topic 272
    7.3 The importance of a combinatorial
           theoretical scheme 274
    7.4 Land and history meanings as contestable 279
    7.5 Identity construction as evaluation of 
          political behaviour 281
    7.6 Social and religious identities and the
           evaluation ordinary life 284
    7.7 The larger significance of the study, gaps
           and recommendations 287

    References 289

    Appendix 317

  • Viriri, Agnella:
    Female Participation in the Post-Independence Zimbabwean Popular Music Industry:
    A Case Study of Edith Katiji (Weutonga) and Sandra Ndebele.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2014. viii & 127 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Abstract iii
    Dedication iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Table of Contents vi
    List of Figures viii

    Chapter One
    Introduction
    1.0 Background and Personal Motivation 1
    1.1 Central aims 4
    1.2 Research questions 5
    1.3 Rationale of the study 6
    1.4 Research methodology 8
    1.5 Ethical considerations 14
    1.6 Arrangement of chapters 15

    Chapter Two
    Literature Review and Theoretical Framework
    2.0 Introduction 16
    2.1 History of Zimbabwean Music 16
    2.2 Theoretical framework 25
      2.2.1 Postmodern feminism 25
      2.2.2 Postcolonial feminism 26
      2.2.3 Africana womanism 28
    2.3 Gender studies in popular music 31
    2.4 Conclusion 35

    Chapter Three
    Edith the Bassist: Challenging the Prescribed Feminine Roles through the Instrument
    3.0 Introduction 38
    3.1 Early childhood experiences: access to formal and
          music education 39
    3.2 The years at Amakhosi: Influences and introduction
          to the bass guitar 41
    3.3 Interruption of femininity through the instrument 43
    3.4 So What! and the move to Harare 45
    3.5 The birth of Weutonga (The New Dawn) 46
    3.6 A Social commentator 47
    3.7 Genre and performance style 51
    3.8 Touring and collaborations 54
    3.9 Technological advancement: An avenue for
           talent exposure 55
    3.10 Government policy on women empowerment 57
    3.11 Women agency: Nurturing female talent 58
    3.12 Management: Formalisation of the career 59
    3.13 Conclusion 61

    Chapter Four
    Sandra Ndebele the Bulawayo dancing queen:
    A subversive rebel

    4.0 Introduction 64
    4.1 Conflict of religion:
          Christianity versus African traditional religion 65
    4.2 Social responsibility 70
    4.3 Fighting within the feminine: A feminism of difference 72
      4.3.1 Sandra’s unconventional dance moves 73
      4.3.2 Clothes and representations 77
      4.3.3 Marital support: Balance between roles 80
    4.4 Marketing and publicity 81
    4.5 Media canvasing reality 83
    4.6 Going global: Touring the world 86
    4.7 Conclusion 87

    Chapter Five
    Organisational agency in the promotion of female musicians
    5.0 Introduction 89
    5.1 Amakhosi Cultural Centre 89
      5.1.1 Origin and history of Amakhosi 90
      5.1.2 Amakhosi’s integration policy 93
      5.1.3 Women in the arts and Amakhosikazi 94
      5.1.4 Promotions and shows at Amakhosi 97
    5.2 Pamberi Trust 98
      5.2.1 Pamberi Trust Arts Development Projects 100
      5.2.2 Female Literary Arts and Music Enterprise (FLAME) 104
      5.2.3 Workshop for women artists by women artists 107
    5.3 Conclusion 109

    Chapter Six
    Conclusion
    6.0 General conclusion 111

    Bibliography 117

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    CONTENTS

    Replace “English template – click Clone & Edit” (the popup name) with the common name for the Word contents file and the jpg file  (e.g. “mortaigne1997”)

    Insert name of author, title and place of publication in the text box.
    Text colour red. Title in bold. ISBN number in black and 10 px.

    Right side column:
    Button Text: Contents
    Button Title: Click here

    Class to Execute Popup: Insert “Shortcode” popuppress id number

    Picture:
    Click on picture – and then click on “Remove”
    Place curser in front of “CONTENTS”

    Click on “Add Media” and select jpg file. Insert.
    Align: Left
    Image CSS class: map-mobile
    Image Margins: Set “Bottom” value i.e. 500
    Insert text from content file. Edit text and save. 

    Adjust  Bottom value if necessary and Publish pup-up
    Copy “Shortcode” including square brackets e.g. Índice and inset and replace it for “Contents” in the page with book list file.

  • Musiyiwa, Mickias:
    The Narrativization of Post-2000 Zimbabwe in the
    Shona Popular Song-Genre: An Appraisal Approach.

    Ph.D. University of Stellenbosch (Stellenbosch), 2013. xii & 413 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Abstract iii
    Opsomming v
    Acknowledgements vii
    List of abbreviations and acronyms xii

    Chapter One
     Introduction to the study
    1.1 Introduction 1
    1.2 Background to the study 1
    1.3 Literature review 4
    1.4 The Nature and purpose of the study 11
       1.4.1 Theoretical approach 11
       1.4.2 Research questions 14
    1.5 Research methodology 14
    1.6 Organization of the study 17

    Chapter Two
    The typology of the Shona popular song-genre
    2.1 Introduction 18
    2.2 Classification of songs 19
       2.2.1 Problems in Oral Literary
                Classification of Songs 20
    2.3 The appraisal framework 22
    2.4 A Genre-based typology of the shona
              popular songs 24
       2.4.1 The genre theory 25
       2.4.2 The multi-rhetoricality of popular songs 50
    2.5 The intertextuality of the Shona popular song 51
       2.5.1 Forms of intertextuality in Shona 
                popular songs 53
       2.5.2 L+R format 54
       2.5.3 Song revivals 56
       2.5.4 Appropriation of other songs’ tunes 56
       2.5.5 Dialogical level 57
       2.5.6 Incorporative level 58
       2.5.7 Monologism 61
       2.5.8 Repetition 63
    2.6 Conclusion 64

    Chapter Three
    The tripartite classification of Zimbabwean
    popular songs into clusters

    3.1 Introduction 65
    3.2 The “small voices in history” and
           “small stories” frameworks 66
       3.2.1 Guha’s “small voices in history” framework 67
       3.2.2 Georgakopoulou’s “small stories” theory 70
    3.3 The “rediscovery of the ordinary” theory 72
    3.4 Key features of state hegemony in Zimbabwe 73
    3.5 A tripartite classification of popular songs 
          into clusters 81
       3.5.1 Grand narrative songs 82
       3.5.2 Small voices/stories songs 82
       3.5.3 Songs of ordinary life 82
    3.6 Factors shaping notions of grand and small
          voices songs 83
       3.6.1 Grand narrative song factors 84
       3.6.2 Small voices song factors 93
    3.7 Conclusion 97

    Chapter Four
    GNS and SSS’ contestations over meanings
    of land and history

    4.1 Introduction 98
    4.2 The themes of land and history 99
    4.3 The Chimurenga grand narrative as experiential
           basis for land metaphors 100
    4.4 Ivhu = vadzimu metaphor 103
       4.4.1 National vadzimu as guardians for all 112
       4.4.2 Land = Nhoroondo (History) metaphor 119
       4.4.3 Land = Ropa remagamba (Blood of fallen heroes) 124
    4.5 Conclusion 134

    Chapter Five
    Identity construction as evaluation of political
    behavior in SSS and GNS

    5.1 Introduction 135
    5.2 Mapping identity construction onto the appraisal
           theory 136
        5.2.1 Attitude’s dimensions of judgement and 
                 appreciation 136
        5.2.2 Political and national identities 138
    5.3 GNS songs and Zanu-PF identities of
          self-construction 140
        5.3.1 The identity of kurwira rusununguko 142
    5.4 Countering Zanu-PF’S positive identities in SSS 156
       5.4.1 The mudzvanyiriri identity 158
       5.4.2 The vaurayi venyika (national destroyers)
                 identity 160
       5.4.3 The identity of uori (corruption) 163
       5.4.4 The identity of jambanja (violence and
                 lawlessness) 168
       5.4.5 Zanu-PF and the kuguma (eschatology)
                identity 175
    5.5 Mutengesi identity as basis for opposition
          persecution  177
       5.5.1 The nationalist origins of the mutengesi
                 identity 177
       5.5.2 State usage of mutengesi identity
                in post-2000 179
    5.6 SSS and MDC identities of self-construction 187
       5.6.1 The opposition and the identity of bumbiro
                 remutemo (constitutionalism) 188
       5.6.2 The rwendo rwechinja (journey of change)
                 identity 191
       5.6.3 The MDC and the identity of economic 
                 recovery 192
    5.7 Conclusion 195

    Chapter Six
    The evaluation of ordinary life through social and
    religious identities in sol

    6.1 Introduction 196
    6.2 Njabulo Ndebele’s the rediscovery of the 
          ordinary theory 196
    6.3 Religious identities 201
       6.3.1 The mufudzi/muchengeti (shepherd/keeper)
                 identity 204
       6.3.2 Mutendi (believer) identity and
                 transcendentalist imagination 209
       6.3.3 Mutadzi identity as quest for 
                 individual liberation 224
       6.3.4 The kuguma (escatology) identity as
                 dramatic representation 230
    6.4 Social identities 240
       6.4.1 The umai (motherhood) and ubaba 
                 (fatherhood) identities 241
    6.5 Conclusion 271

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusions and recommendations
    7.1 Introduction 272
    7.2 The relevance of the topic 272
    7.3 The importance of a combinatorial
           theoretical scheme 274
    7.4 Land and history meanings as contestable 279
    7.5 Identity construction as evaluation of 
          political behaviour 281
    7.6 Social and religious identities and the
           evaluation ordinary life 284
    7.7 The larger significance of the study, gaps
           and recommendations 287

    References 289

    Appendix 317

  • Hollenstein, Markus:
    Stella Rambisai Chiweshe – The Queen of Mbira.    
    M.Phil. Fakultät für Sozialwissenschaften, Universität Wien, 2012. 120 p.

    INHALT

    Vorwort 1
    Stella Chiweshe – Through Mbira 3
    1. Through Mbira – Einleitung zum Thema 4
    2.1 Die Reise beginnt – Die Erforschung des
          Forschungsfeldes 8
    2.2 Ambuya erzählt – Das narrativ-biographische 
          Interview 14
    2.3 Felder explodieren – Datenerhebung 17
    2.4 Das Schlaue Buch – Literaturrecherche 19
    2.5 Fluch oder Segen – Informationen aus dem
          World Wide Web 21
    2.6 Mbira-Musk in Theorie und Praxis – Methodik 
          zur Notation 24
    3. Der Rote Faden – Fragestellung 32
    4.1 Das Mädchen mit der Trommel in der Brust – Rambisai 35
    4.2 Rinderhüten mit Folgen – über den Ersten Chimurenga 45
    4.3 Der Umzug nach Bindura – Mapira 57
    5.1 Die Mbira-Lektion von Sekuru Flavian Mavetu –
          Engendering Mbira 68
    5.2 Das Zappeln geht weiter – vom Zweiten Chimurenga 78
    5.3 Kassahwa – die Entstehung eines Hits 84
    6.1 Meerjungfrau und Wassermann – Njuzu & Njuvi 91
    6.2 Die Heimkehr – Stella Chiweshe begegnet mwari 
          musikavanhu 100
    6.3 Ambuya Chiweshes Aufgabe ist vollendet –
          Ausblicke 104
    7. The Queen of Mbira – Schlussfolgerung 106
    8. Der Traum, ein Leben – Nachwort 108
    9. Quellenverzeichnis 109
    Anhang

  • Makunganya, Abraham:
    Zimbabwean Societal Perceptions of the Depiction
    of Women in Matavire’s Two Love Songs.

    B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2015. viii & 50 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Certificate of Supervision ii
    Acknowledgements iii
    Dedications iv
    Abstract v

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 Introduction 1
    1.2 Background to the study 1
    1.3 Statement of the problem 4
    1.4 Aim 5
    1.5 Objectives 5
    1.6 Assumptions 5
    1.7 Research questions 6
    1.8 Significance of the study 6
    1.9 Delimitations 7
    1.10 Limitations 7
    1.11 Definition of terms 7
    1.12 Conclusion 9

    Chapter 2
    Literature review
    2.0 Introduction 10
    2.1 Biography of Paul Matavire 10
    2.2 The effect of gender construct as a source
         of Music lyrical content 12
    2.3 Images of women in popular music 14
    2.4 Women and popular music at international level 15
    2.4 Mysogyn in Rap/Hip Hop music 16
    2.6 Women and popular music at regional level 17
    2.7 Women and popular music in Zimbabwe 18
    2.8 Observations on women and popular music in Zimbabwe 19
    2.9 Summary20

    Chapter 3
    Methodology
    3.1 Introduction 22
    3.2 Research Design 22
    3.3 Theoretical Framework 23
    3.4 Population 24
    3.5 Sampling 24
    3.6 Stratified random sampling 25
    3.7 Methods of collecting data 25
    3.8 Data presentation and analysis 27
    3.9 Qualitative context analysis 28
    3.10 Conclusion 29

    Chapter 4
    Presentation, analysis and interpretation of data findings
    4.1 Introduction 30
    4.2 Do you like listening to Matavire’s love songs? 30
    4.3 Songs that Matavire is remembered for 31
    4.4 The issues raised in the two selected songs 32
    4.5 Who initiates the “Love Talk” in the episodes? 33
    4.6 How are women is depicted in Matavire’s two songs 4
    4.7 Lessons drawn from the songs 35
    4.8 Discussion of findings 38
    4.9 The role of musicians in redressing gender imbalances 39
    4.10 Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations
    5.1 Introduction 42
    5.2 Summary 42
    5.3 Conclusions drawn 43
    5.4 Recommendations 43
    5.5 Conclusion 44

    References 45

    Appendix 1: Questionnaire 47
    Appendix 2: Interview Schedule 50

  • Chihora, Tinomutenda:
    The Use of Vulgar Lyrics by Zimdancehall Artists in Some of their Songs: A Survey Carried Out in Gweru, Midlands, Zimbabwe.
    B.S. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2016. 53 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Supervisor’s Approval form ii
    Dedication iii
    Acknowledgements iv
    Abstract v

    Chapter 1
    1.0 Introduction 1
    1.1 Background of the study 1
    1.2 Statement of the problem 2
    1.3 Research questions 3
    1.4 Significance of study 3
    1.5 Limitations 4
    1.6 Delimitations 4
    1.7 Functional definition of terms 5
    1.8 Conclusion 5

    Chapter 2
    2.0 Literature review 6
    2.1 Introduction 6
    2.2 The historical background of Zimdancehall 6
    2.2.1 Zimdancehall defined 6
    2.2.2 The origin and development of Zimdancehall 6
    2.3 The role of text in a song 8
    2.4 The Impact of Technology on Music Production,
           Marketing, Performance and Distribution 13
    2.5 The role of music censorship in Zimbabwe in
           view of vulgar lyrics 14
    2.6 The marketing of music in Zimbabwe today 15
    2.7 The context in which Zimdancehall is performed 15
    2.8 Conclusion 16

    Chapter 3
    3.0 research methodology 17
    3.1 Introduction 17
    3.2 Research Design 17
    3.2.1 Research Approach 17
    3.3 Research Population 18
    3.4 The Sampling Procedures 18
    3.5 Research Instruments 19
       3.5.1 Interviews 19
       3.5.1.1 Advantages of interviews 19
       3.5.1.2 Disadvantages of interviews 20
    3.6 Data collection Procedures 20
    3.7 Data analysis 20
    3.8 Ethical considerations 20
    3.9 Conclusion 21

    Chapter 4
    4.0 Data presentation, interpretation and analysis 22
    4.1 Introduction 22
    4.2 Data Presentation 22
       4.2.2 Summary of reasons given by the interviewees
                on the use vulgar lyrics by Zimdancehall in Gweru 23
    4.3 Data interpretation and analysis 26
       4.3.1 Zimdancehall and its origins 26
       4.3.2 Zimdancehall artists, their lifestyle
                and needs 27
       4.3.3 Zimdancehall production and marketing
              procedures 32
    4.4 Conclusion 36

    Chapter 5
    5.0 Summary, conclusions and recommendations 37
    5.1 Introduction 37
    5.2 Summary of the Research 37
    5.3 Conclusions 37
    5.4 Recommendations 39

    References 41

    Appendices 45
    Interview guide for Zimdancehall artists I
    Interview guide for Zimdancehall producers II
    Interview guide for arts organization III
    Interview guide for pastors, church elders and youth IV
    Interview guide for music critics V
    Introductory letter

  • Banda, Jane:
    Zimbabwean Copyright Law and its Effectiveness in
    Protecting Composers’ Intellectual Property Rights.

    B.Sc. Midlands State University (Gweru), 2012. ix & 48 p.

    CONTENTS

    Contents i
    Approval Form iii
    Abstract iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Dedication vi
    List of Tables vii
    List of Figures viii
    Acronyms ix

    Chapter 1
    1.0 Introduction 1
    1.1 Background to the problem 1
    1.2 Statement of the problem 4
    1.3 Objectives 5
    1.4 Research questions 5
    1.5 Significance of the study 6
    1.6 Assumptions 6
    1.7 Limitations 7
    1.8 Delimitations 7
    1.9 Definition of terms 8
    1.10 Conclusions 8

    Chapter 2
    2.0 Literature review 9
    2.1 Introduction 9
    2.2 Who music composers are 9
    2.3 Copyright law and intellectual property rights 10
    2.4 History and development of Copyright Law 12
    2.5 Who owns copyright in a musical work 12
    2.6 The Collecting Society in Zimbabwe 13
    2.7 Duration of Copyright 14
    2.8 How composers have benefited from copyright law 15
    2.9 Rights protected by copyright law 15
       2.9.1 Economic rights 16
       2.9.2 Moral rights 16
       2.9.3 Mechanical rights 17
       2.9.4 Performing rights 17
    2.10 Copyright Infringement 17
    2.11 Piracy 19
    2.12 Conclusion 23

    Chapter 3
    3.0 Methodology and research design 24
    3.1 Introduction 24
    3.2 Research design 24
    3.3 Population, sample and sampling procedure 25
    3.4 Research instruments 25
        3.4.1 Questionnaires 25
        3.4.2 Interviews 27
    3.5 Data collection procedure 27
    3.6 Data presentation, analysis and interpretation 29
    3.7 Conclusion 29

    Chapter 4
    4.0 Data presentation, analysis and interpretation 30
    4.1 Introduction 30
    4.2 Responses 30
    4.3 Conclusion 40

    Chapter 5
    5.0 Summary, conclusions and recommendations 41
    5.1 Introduction 41
    5.2 Summary of the results 41
    5.3 Conclusion of findings 42
    5.4 Recommendations 43
    5.5 Conclusion 44

    References 45

    Appendix 1 46
    Appendix 2 47
    Appendix 3 48
    Department Letter 49
    Release Form 50

  • Johnson, John William:
    ‘Heelloy’. Modern Poetry and Songs of the Somalis.
    London: HAAN Publishing, 1998. xxiii & 241 p.
    ISBN 978-1-874-20981-2

    CONTENTS

    Foreword to the first edition by B. W. Andrzejewski ix
    Foreword to the 1996 edition by Abdilahi Qarshi xi
    Preface to the first edition xv
    Preface to the 1996 edition xxiii

    1. Introduction
    The social context 1
    The Nature of Traditional Pastoralist Poetry 12
    The Historical Development of Modern Oral Poetry 17

    2. The Family of Miniature Genres
    The Nature of the Family of Miniature Genres 27
    The Poetry of the Miniature Family 32

    3. The emergence of the Belwo
    The Historical Background 49
    The Belwo is Born 53
    The Poetry of the Belwo 59

    4. The Heello: Period One
    The Metamorphosis: Belwo to Heello A 75
    The Modem Poem: Heello A to Heello B 82

    5. The Heello: Period Two
    The Historical Background 95
    The Poetry of the Second Period 103

    6. The Heello: Period Three
    The Historical Background 117
    The Poetry of the Third Period 146

    7. Characteristics of the Heello: All Periods
    Themes Common to All Periods 175
    Structural Characteristics and
    Development Common to All Periods 190
    The Impact of Media on Modern Poetry 208

    8. Conclusion
    The Inheritance of the Heello 215
    Forces Behind the Success and Development of Modern Poetry 216

  • Bere, Wonderful G.:
    Urban Grooves:
    The Performance of Politics in Zimbabwe’s Hip Hop Music.
    Ph.D. New York University, 2008. xiii & 229 p.

    CONTENTS

    Dedication iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Abstract viii
    List of tables 13

    Introduction 1

    Chapter I
    Back to the same: from great Zimbabwe to Zimbabwe ruins 17
    Causes of the Zimbabwean crisis 20
    The land question 20
    Balancing act: Social justice and economic progress 25
    ESAP 26
    War veterans 27
    The civic community 28
    Land invasions: The third chimurenga 29
    Rigged elections 31
    Breakdown of the rule of law 32

    Chapter II
    Music, society and politics 36
    Marxism and the arts 37
    Music and social memory 41
    Chimurenga music 43
    Post-independence protest music 51
    Post-independence chimurenga music 53
    Music serving the state 57

    Chapter III
    Censorship in Zimbabwean music 61
    Censorship legislation 66
    Censorship and Entertainment Control Act, 1967 67
    Blacklisting of music on radio and television 73
    Harassment and intimidation of musicians 74
    Self-censorship 77
    Co-option of musicians and take-overs of recording companies 78
    Recording industry censorship 80

    Chapter IV
    Towards a genealogy of urban grooves 82
    From worldbeat to localbeat: Hip Hop to urban grooves 82
    Defining urban grooves 94
    Its grooving time: Urban youth culture takes center stage 96
    The pre-urban grooves movement 100
    Government intervention and the 75 percent local content policy 115
    The Capital Radio saga 116
    The B.S.A 116
    “Urban Grooves Volume 1”: Urban grooves arrives 118
    Issues in urban grooves 120

    Chapter V
    Infectious beats: State politicization of urban grooves 124
    State sponsorship of urban grooves 131

    Chapter VI
    Deception, dissonance and subversion in urban grooves 146
    Urban grooves or urban blues: Love, migration and the blues in the grooves 159
    Laughter as medicine: Xtra large 171
    Social dissonance as political protest: Maskiri 176
    Disowning urban grooves 184
    Toyi Toyi Hip Hop: Performance as activism 185

    Conclusion
    The sound of mourning 190
    Endnotes 198

    Bibliography 204

  • Kabwato, Chris:
    The Emergence of Youth Protest Music and Arts as
    Alternative Media in Zimbabwe: A Gramscian Analysis.

    M.A. Rhodes University (Grahamstown), 2016. 100 p.

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 2
    Abstract3

    Chapter 1
    Introduction
    1.1 General background of the study: a personal note 6
    1.2 Objectives of the study 8
    1.3 Significance of the study 8
    1.4 Thesis outline 10

    Chapter 2
    Locating the Magamba Network in the media
    landscape of Zimbabwe

    2.1 Introduction 12
    2.2 The context of the media laws and the implications for
           democratic participation 13
    2.3 The media regulatory environment 16
      2.3.1 Access to Information and Protection of
               Privacy Act (AIPPA) 18
      2.3.2 The Criminal Law Codification Act (Chapter 9:23) 19
    2.4 The broadcasting regulatory environment 20
    2.5 Diasporic media 24

    Chapter 3
    Theories and perspectives on the public sphere,
    hegemony and popular culture

    3.1 Introduction 28
    3.2 The public sphere 28
    3.3 Hegemony31
    3.4 Popular culture 36
    3.5 Critical appropriation 39
    3.6 The struggle over language 42
    3.7 Media and Internet – spaces of engagement 43

    Chapter 4
    Research methodology and data analysis procedures
    4.1 Introduction 46
    4.2 Qualitative research methodology 46
    4.3 Qualitative content analysis 48
    4.4 The Qualitative interview 54
    4.5 The Interview guide 55
    4.6 Sampling 55
    4.7 Ethical concerns 56
    4.8 Recording the interview 57
    4.9 Observation 58

    Chapter 5
    Presentation and analysis of findings
    5.1 Introduction 60
    5.2 Freedom of expression and creative spaces 62
    5.3 Hegemonic discourses – contesting narratives of
          patriotism and sovereignty 67
    5.4 The politics of identity and critical appropriation (music,
          language and symbols) at both global and local levels 73
    5.5 Organic intellectuals and the quest for democracy and
          social justice 79

    Chapter 6
    Conclusion
    6.1 Introduction 85
    6.2 Summary 86
    6.3 Scope for further research 87

    Appendix A 88

  • Moyo, Nomusa:
    “I will not speak”: The Socio-Political in the Music of Albert Nyathi.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2008. v & 74 p.

    CONTENTS

    Title i
    Abstract ii
    Declaration iii
    Acknowledgements iv
    Table of contents v

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1
    Chapter Two
    Literature review 12
    Chapter Three
    Of speech and silence: Claiming the right to speak 20
    Chapter Four
    Disillusionment with independence 46
    Chapter Five
    Conclusion 66

    Bibliography 68

  • Viriri, Agnella:
    Female Participation in the Post-Independence Zimbabwean Popular Music Industry:
    A Case Study of Edith Katiji (Weutonga) and Sandra Ndebele.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2014. viii & 127 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Abstract iii
    Dedication iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Table of Contents vi
    List of Figures viii

    Chapter One
    Introduction
    1.0 Background and Personal Motivation 1
    1.1 Central aims 4
    1.2 Research questions 5
    1.3 Rationale of the study 6
    1.4 Research methodology 8
    1.5 Ethical considerations 14
    1.6 Arrangement of chapters 15

    Chapter Two
    Literature Review and Theoretical Framework
    2.0 Introduction 16
    2.1 History of Zimbabwean Music 16
    2.2 Theoretical framework 25
      2.2.1 Postmodern feminism 25
      2.2.2 Postcolonial feminism 26
      2.2.3 Africana womanism 28
    2.3 Gender studies in popular music 31
    2.4 Conclusion 35

    Chapter Three
    Edith the Bassist: Challenging the Prescribed Feminine Roles through the Instrument
    3.0 Introduction 38
    3.1 Early childhood experiences: access to formal and
          music education 39
    3.2 The years at Amakhosi: Influences and introduction
          to the bass guitar 41
    3.3 Interruption of femininity through the instrument 43
    3.4 So What! and the move to Harare 45
    3.5 The birth of Weutonga (The New Dawn) 46
    3.6 A Social commentator 47
    3.7 Genre and performance style 51
    3.8 Touring and collaborations 54
    3.9 Technological advancement: An avenue for
           talent exposure 55
    3.10 Government policy on women empowerment 57
    3.11 Women agency: Nurturing female talent 58
    3.12 Management: Formalisation of the career 59
    3.13 Conclusion 61

    Chapter Four
    Sandra Ndebele the Bulawayo dancing queen:
    A subversive rebel

    4.0 Introduction 64
    4.1 Conflict of religion:
          Christianity versus African traditional religion 65
    4.2 Social responsibility 70
    4.3 Fighting within the feminine: A feminism of difference 72
      4.3.1 Sandra’s unconventional dance moves 73
      4.3.2 Clothes and representations 77
      4.3.3 Marital support: Balance between roles 80
    4.4 Marketing and publicity 81
    4.5 Media canvasing reality 83
    4.6 Going global: Touring the world 86
    4.7 Conclusion 87

    Chapter Five
    Organisational agency in the promotion of female musicians
    5.0 Introduction 89
    5.1 Amakhosi Cultural Centre 89
      5.1.1 Origin and history of Amakhosi 90
      5.1.2 Amakhosi’s integration policy 93
      5.1.3 Women in the arts and Amakhosikazi 94
      5.1.4 Promotions and shows at Amakhosi 97
    5.2 Pamberi Trust 98
      5.2.1 Pamberi Trust Arts Development Projects 100
      5.2.2 Female Literary Arts and Music Enterprise (FLAME) 104
      5.2.3 Workshop for women artists by women artists 107
    5.3 Conclusion 109

    Chapter Six
    Conclusion
    6.0 General conclusion 111

    Bibliography 117

  • Mudzanire, Benjamin:
    An Interrogation of the Context Referentiality of Postcolonial Shona
    Popular Music in Zimbabwe: A Search for the Contemporary Leitmotifs.

    Ph.D. University of South Africa (Pretoria), 2016. xii & 380 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration i
    Dedication ii
    Acknowledgements iii
    Abstract iv
    Key words v
    List of tables xii

    Chapter 1
    Introduction 1
    1.0 Preamble 1
    1.1 Background 2
      1.1.1 Pre-colonial Shona music and social context 2
      1.1.2 Shona music during the colonial period 6
      1.1.3 The postcolonial period 10
    1.2 Towards a working definition of popular music 11
    1.3 Statement of problem 12
    1.4 Aim of the research 13
      1.4.1 Objectives 13
      1.4.2 Research questions 14
    1.5 Justification 14
    1.6 Key words 17
    1.7 Scope of study 18
    1.8 Conclusion 19

    Chapter 2
    Literature review 21
    2.0 Introduction 21
    2.1 The nature of music 21
      2.1.1 Music as communication 25
      2.2.0 Language and music 28
      2.2.1 Music as literature 29
    2.3 The use of figurative language in music 32
    2.4 Music appreciation 34
    2.5 The role of music in society 36
      2.5.1 Global trends in music and socio-political context 37
      2.5.2 Regional trends in music and socio-political context 42
    2.6 Music in colonial Zimbabwe 46
    2.7 Postcolonial music literature in Zimbabwe 48
    2.8 Music censorship and freedom of expression 52
      2.8.1 Freedom of expression 53
      2.8.2 Music censorship 54
      2.8.3 Agents of music censorship 60
    2.9 Conclusion 63

    Chapter 3
    Theoretical framework 64
    3.0 Introduction 64
    3.1 The sociological approach 65
      3.1.1 New historicism 67
      3.1.2 Marxism and popular music 75
      3.1.3 Afrocentricity 78
      3.1.4 Africana womanism 81
    3.2 Conclusion 84

    Chapter 4
    Research methodology 85
    4.0 Introduction 85
    4.1 The qualitative research paradigm 85
      4.1.1 Research design 87
      4.1.2 Hermeneutics 88
        4.1.2.1 Characteristics of hermeneutics 89
        4.1.2.2 Basic hermeneutic questions and authorial 
                    assumptions 99
        4.1.2.2.1 Precautionary authorial assumptions 99
        4.1.2.3 Hermeneutics and qualitative research 105
      4.1.3 Data gathering techniques 106
        4.1.3.1 Interviews 106
        4.1.3.1.1 Advantages of interviews 107
        4.1.3.1.2 A cautionary note on interviews 108
        4.1.3.2 Document analysis 109
        4.1.3.2.1 Merits 110
        4.1.3.2.2 Cautionary points 111
        4.1.3.3 Choosing research subjects 111
        4.1.3.3.1 Judge mental sampling method 111
        4.1.3.3.1.1 Advantages of purposive sampling 112
        4.1.3.3.1.2 Cautionary points 113
        4.1.3.3.2 Sampling of music critics 113
        4.1.3.3.3 Sampling of music 113
        4.1.3.3.4 Sampling of music consumers 113
        4.1.3.4 Transcription of music 114
        4.1.3.5 Translation of music 114
      4.1.4 Data presentation and analysis 115
      4.1.5 Ethical considerations 116
    4.2 Conclusion 118

    Chapter 5
    Legal and political motifs 119
    5.0 Introduction 119
    5.1 Analysis of legal documents 120
      5.1.1 Legislation 120
        5.1.1.1 Freedom of expression 120
        5.1.1.2 The Censorship and Entertainments 
                    Control Act [Chapter 10:04] 123
        5.1.1.3 Broadcasting Services Act 128
        5.1.1.4 The 75% Local Content regulation 130
    5.2 Analysis of songs with a political motif 132
      5.2.1 Independence euphoria 133
      5.2.2 War memories 140
      5.2.3 The call for unity 144
      5.2.4 Exploitation of the subaltern 151
      5.2.5 The land question 160
      5.2.6 Corruption 171
      5.2.7 Political violence 176
      5.2.8 Political polarisation 187
    5.3 Analysis of Interviews 194
      5.3.1 Profile of interviewees 195
      5.3.2 Interviewee responses 197
        5.3.2.1 Freedom of expression 197
        5.3.2.2 Censorship 201
        5.3.2.3 Reflections on independence 206
        5.3.2.4 War memories 209
        5.3.2.5 National unity 210
      5.3.6 Exploitation of the subaltern 211
      5.3.7 Politcal party music 212
    5.3 Conclusion 213

    Chapter 6
    Socio-economic leitmotifs in Shona music 215
    6.0 Introduction 215
    6.1 Analysis of songs with a socio-economic motif 215
      6.1.1 Culture 215
      6.1.2 The concept of unhu/ubuntu 223
      6.1.3 Romantic expressions 227
      6.1.4 Domestic violence 234
      6.1.5 Divorce 241
      6.1.6 The HIV/AIDS conundrum 245
      6.1.7 Gender issues 251
      6.1.8 Poverty 262
      6.1.9 Escaping home:
               Diasporan discourses in popular music 270
    6.2 Analysis of Interviews 279
      6.2.1 Music and culture 280
      6.2.2 Marriage and family issues 282
      6.2.3 Romantic expressions 284
      6.2.4 Gender 286
      6.2.5 Economic issues 288
      6.2.6 Diasporan discourses 290
    6.3 Conclusion 294

    Chapter 7
    Discussion 295
    7.0 Introduction 295
    7.1 The creative environment of music 295
      7.1.1 The escape route 300
    7. 2 Political motifs 302
      7.2.1 Sustaining nationalist meta-narratives 302
        7.2.1.1 Immediate post-independence reflections 303
      7.2.2 Counter-narrating the vision of the state 307
        7.2.2.1 Land 308
        7.2.2.2 Corruption 309
        7.2.2.3 Political violence 310
        7.2.2.4 Political polarisation 312
    7.3 Socio-economic issues 313
      7.3.1 Culture 314
      7.3.2 Romantic expressions 315
      7.3.3 Domestic violence and divorce 317
      7.3.4 The HIV and AIDS pandemic 319
      7.3.5 Gender 320
      7.3.6 Poverty 323
      7.3.7 Escaping home: diasporan discourses in popular music 326
    7.4 Conclusion 328

    Chapter 8
    Conclusion 329
    8.0 Introduction 329
    8.1 Research findings 329
    8.2 Recommendations of the study 335

    References 337

    Appendices 373
    Appendix A: Music critics 373
    Appendix B: Artiste Interview 374
    Appendix C: Interview guide: music listeners 375
    Appendix D: Interviews with diasporans 377
    Appendix E: Curriculum Vitae for Mudzanire Benjamin 378

  • Groves, Ryan Dale:
    Popular Music and Identity in Southern Rhodesia, 1930-1960.
    Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2015. xiii & 249 p.

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures xi

    Introduction 1
    How We Understand African Music 5
    Disciplinary Examinations of African Music 13
    Theoretical Problems of African Music 21
    Where Does This Study Fit In? 34

    Chapter 1
    Setting the Stage 39
    South-Central African History, c 1800-1890 42
    Don’t Tell Them Jesus Loves Them 51
    Bibles and Bazookas: Capitalizing on Christianity 60
    The Man in the Long Black Coat 65
    A House Done Built Without Hands 82

    Chapter 2
    The Changing Nature of African Music 101
    Indigenous Music on the Eve of Colonization 102
    Western Music Enters the Fray 108
    Orpheus McAdoo and the Irony of Minstrality 112
    Musical Values in African Christianity 117
    The Storm without the Music: Musical Ethics in
    Southern Rhodesia 125
    African Hymnody: A Case Study in Cultural Imperialism 129
    Night Singing and Rising Cultural Protest 143

    Chapter 3
    African Popular Music Enters the City 155
    Expressions of Indigenous Culture in Early Salisbury 162
    Increased State Control over African Cultural Production
    and Consumption 170
    Township Jazz in All its Iterations 178
    Masiganda: Singer-Songwriters in Africa 185
    The Commodification of African Music 202

    Chapter 4
    New Ethics through Music 210
    Black, Brown, and Beige: A Portrait of the African Middle Class 219
    Education and African Culture 223
    Reactions by the African Middle Class 231

    Conclusion 234

    Bibliography 240

  • Chamisa, Vimbai:
    Commodified Versions of Shona Indigenous Music:
    (Re)constructing Tradition in Zimbabwean Popular Music.
    M.A. University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), 2012. viii & 128 p.

    CONTENTS

    Declaration ii
    Dedication iii
    Abstract iv
    Acknowledgements v
    Contents vi
    List of Figures viii

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1
    Musical Traditions and Historical Processes 4
    Influences in the Popular Music 7
    Research Aim and Rationale 9
    Research Objectives 10
    Research Methods and Procedures 11
    Classifying the Repertoire 16
    The Socio-political Significance 18
    Chapter Summaries 19

    Chapter Two
    Literature Review and Theoretical Framework 21
    Introduction 21
    Towards Understanding Shona Popular Adaptations
    as “Traditional” Art 21
    Authenticity and Identity in Music 25
    Adaptation of Traditional Music and Copyright 28
    Structural Analysis 32

    Chapter Three
    “Doing the Serious Business of Older People Correctly”:
    Zimbabwean Mbira Popular Adaptations 36
    Introduction 36
    Historical Background to the Performance of Mbira Indigenous Music 37
    Strategies for Adapting Mbira Traditional Music 39
        Imitation: Entire Mbira Adaptation 40
        Sampling: Adapting the Standard Basic Mbira Part: Imitation 44
        Abstract Adaptation: Adapting Sung Mbira Melody and or Text 52
    Connection between Popular Texts and Traditional Mbira Pieces 59
    Conclusion 62

    Chapter Four
    Impacts of Shona Ngoma Rhythms on Zimbabwean Popular Music 66
    Introduction 66
    Understanding Ngoma Rhythms 67
    Combining Technique: Interpreting Connections between Shona Ngoma Genres 69
    Traditional and Popular Manifestations 74
    Imitation: Entire ngoma adaptations 75
    Sampling of Shona ngoma music 76
    Jiti Popular music: Relationship between Musical Style and Lyrics 84
    Conclusion 88

    Chapter Five
    Commodified Shona Music: Safeguarding Indigenous Musical heritage? Local Community Perspectives 92
    Introduction 92
    Preservation through Adaptation 95
    Traditional Music and the Heritage Discourse in Zimbabwe 96
    Community Members and their Relationships to Shona Traditional Music 98
    Hearing Popular Adaptations as Nhaka 102
    Discussions of the Traditional 107
    Conclusion 109

    Chapter Six
    Conclusions 110

    Appendix
     A List of Commodified Shona Songs 115

    Bibliography 121
    Discography 128

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    Fela. Kalakuta Notes. 2nd edition
    Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2015.  xii & 326 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8195-7539-5 (paper) 978-0-8195-7540-1 (ebook)

    CONTENTS

    Foreword by Banning Eyre ix
    Introduction 1

    Part 1 Early Days
    1 The Birth of Afrobeat 27
    2 Joe Mensah Remembers 41
    3 Fela in Ghana 49
    4 Stan Plange Remembers 29

    Part 2 Confrontation
    5 Kalakuta is Born 67
    6 “JB” Talks about Fela 73
    7 The Kalakuta Republic 81
    8 The Black President 114
    9 Amsterdam and After 125

    Part 3 Retrospect
    10 Mac Tontoh on Fela 139
    11 Frank Talk about Fela 152
    12 Obiba Plays It Again 165
    13 Smart Binete Sorts It Out 174
    14 Anku Checks Out the Beat 178
    15 Nana Danso Orchestrates 183
    16 Some Early Afro-Fusion Pioneers 197
    17 Interview with Fela 204
    18 Afterthoughts and Updates 209
    19. Felabrations at Home and Abroad 238

    Chronology 259
    Notes 269
    Selected Bibliography 281
    Discography 285
    Appendix A: “Shuffering and Shmiling” Score 303
    Index 309

  • Erlmann, Veit (ed.):
    Populäre Musik in Afrika.

    Veröffentlichungen des Museum für Völkerkunde.
    Neue Folge 53. Abteilung Musikethnologie VIII.
    Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde, 1991. 312 pp. & 2 CDs.
    ISBN 3-88609-213-5

    bender1985INHALT (Button Type)

    Klick hier (Button Title)

    Class to Execute Popup (shortcode id number)

    Picture:

    Align “Left”

    map-mobile

    Image Margins – Bottom

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    ÍNDICE

    Replace “Portuguese template – click Clone & Edit” (the popup name) with the common name for the content file and jpg file  (e.g. “mortaigne1997”)

    Insert name of author, title and place of publication in the text box.
    Text colour red. Title in bold. ISBN number in black and 10 px.

    Right side column:
    Button Text: Índice
    Button Title: Clique aqui

    Class to Execute Popup: Insert “Shortcode” popuppress id number

    Picture:
    Click on picture – and then click on “Remove”
    Place curser in front of “SUMÁRIO”

    Click on “Add Media” and select jpg file. Insert.
    Align: Left
    Image CSS class: map-mobile
    Image Margins: Set “Bottom” value i.e. 500
    Insert text from content file. Edit text and save. 

    Adjust  Bottom value if necessary and Publish pup-up
     Copy “Shortcode” including square brackets e.g. Índice and inset and replace it for “Sumário” in the book list file.

  • Insert title etc. here
    ISBN number

    TABLE DES MATIÈRESafropop1995

    Table des matières (Button Text)

    Cliquez ici (Button Title)

    Class to Execute Popup (insert Shortcode popuppress id number)

    Picture:

    Click on picture “Edit” and set/insert:

    “Align” Left

    “Image CSS class” map-mobile

    Image Margins – “Bottom” (set value i.e. 500)

  • Sweeney, Philip:
    Directory of World Music. A Guide to Performers and their Music.
    With Contributions from Peter Gabriel, Andy Kershaw, Giberto Gil [&] Manu Dibango.
    London: Virgin Books, 1991. 262 p.
    Section Africa 1-81
    ISBN 0-86369-378-4

    sweeney1991CONTENTS

    AFRICA

    The North and West
    Introduction: Peter Gabriel 1
    Libya 3
    Tunisia 5
    Algeria 6
    Morocco 13
    Mauritania 16
    Senegal 17
    Mali 20
    Guinea 26
    Guinea-Bissau 29
    Cape Verde 29
    Sierra Leone 31
    Côte d’Ivoire 32
    Ghana 34
    Togo and Benin 36
    Nigeria 37

    Central Africa, The South and East
    Introduction: Manu Dibango 42
    Cameroon 44
    Zaire 49
    Congo 56
    Gabon 56
    Angola 57
    Zambia 58
    Mozambique 59
    Zimbabwe 60
    South Africa 65
    Madagascar 70
    Mauritius and Reunion 71
    Tanzania and Zanzibar 72
    Kenya 74
    Uganda 76
    Burundi 76
    Ethiopia 77
    Sudan 79

  • Lee, Hélène:
    Rockers d’Afrique. Stars et légendes du rock mandinque.
    Paris: Albin Michel, 1988. 223 pp.
    ISBN 2-226-03 139-1 

    TABLE DE MATIÈRESafropop1995

    Click here to open pop-up

    Click here

    Cliquez ici pour ouvrir la fenêtre pop-up

    Cliquez ici

    Clique aqui para abrir o pop-up
    Clique aqui

    Klick hier