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Adjei, Georgina:
An Assessment of Highlife Music in
Promoting Ghana’s National Identity.

M.A. University of Ghana (Legon), 2016. viii & 91 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 4.27 MB

Adjetey, Adjei Moses:
Music Production and Preservation at
Ghana Broadcasting Corporation.

M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2015. v & 104 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 5.60 MB

Adom, Bertha Setor:
Faisal Helwani: A Study of his Contribution to the Music Business of Ghana.
Ph.D. University of Ghana (Legon), 1999.

Adum-Attah, K.:
Nana Ampadu: Master of Highlife Music.
M.Phil. University of Cape Coast, 1997.

Aidoo, Stephen:
Saxophone Solos in Ghanaian Highlife Music:
An Analytical Study of Tempos and the Ramblers International Bands.
MPhil Music. University of Ghana (Legon), 2014. ix & 211 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 5.04 MB

Akrong, Isaac Richard Nii Kwaku:
Hip Life Music: Re-Defining Ghanaian Culture (1990-2012).
Ph.D. York University (Toronto, ON), 2012. xi & 298 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 14.60 MB

Alleyne, Osei:
Dancehall Diaspora: Roots, Routes and Reggae Music in Ghana.
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pa.), 2017. 384 p.
ProQuest no. 10635300

Amegatcher, Adelaide:
The Concert Parties: A Manifestation of Popular Drama in Ghana.
M.A. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1968. 89 p.

Amoah, N. Abena Dansowaa:
Ghanaian Female Performers of Highlife Music (1970-Present):
A Historical and Ethnographic Study.

Ph.D. Indiana University (Bloomington, Ind.), 2016. xxi & 201 p.
ProQuest no. 10144223

Ampofo, Seth:
The Life of Jerry Hanson and the Formation of
the Ramblers International Dance Band.

M.M. University of Ghana (Legon), 2011.

Arthur, Peter:
The Textuality of Contemporary Hiplife Lyrics.
Ph.D. University of Birmingham, 2013. 265 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.46 MB

Ash-Morgan, Nate:
The New Hip-life Beat: Rooted in Ga Drumming.
B.A. Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.). 2008. 38 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 466 KB

Boateng, Samuel:
Popular Music in Ghana:
Women and the Changing Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality.

M.A. Kent State University (Kent, Ohio), 2016. 119 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 9.15 MB

Brempong, Owusu:
Akan Highlife in Ghana: Songs of Cultural Transition. Part 1 & 2.
Ph.D. Indiana University, 1986. 357 & 712 p.
Contents

Coffie, M. M.:
Dance Band Highlife:
Analytical Study of Ebo Taylor, Stan Plange and Kodwo Donkor.

M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2012.

Cole, Catherine M.:
Ghanaian Popular Theater:
A Historical Ethnography of the Concert Party, 1895 to 1965.

Ph.D. Northwestern University, 1996. 310 p.
ProQuest no. 9714570

Collins, [Edmund] John:
The Ghanaian Concert Party: African Popular Entertainment at the Cross Roads.
Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, 1994. 607 p.
Contents

Darkwa, Asante:
The New Musical Traditions in Ghana.
Ph.D. Wesleyan University, 1974. 269 p.
Contents

Gyan, Nana:
HipHop in Ghana.
M.A. University of Ghana, 1994.

Kaye, Andrew Laurence:
Koo Nimo and his Circle: A Ghanaian Musician in Ethnomusicological Perspective.
Ph.D. Columbia University, 1992. 526 p.
Contents

Kyere, Abena:
A Comparative Study of the Lives and Works of Selected
Ghanaian Female Musicians from 1980-2010.

M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2014. viii &144 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 2.07 MB
http://ugspace.ug.edu.gh/handle/123456789/5482

Matczynski, William:
Highlife and its Roots: Negotiating the Social, Cultural, and
Musical Continuities Between Popular and Traditional Music in Ghana.

Macalester College (Saint Paul, Minn,), Music Honors Projects. Paper 10, 2011. 67 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar  1.41 MB

Nyarko, Isaac:
The Influence of Popular Music among the Youth of Ngleshie Amanfro, Accra.
M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2016. x & 114 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 7.60 MB

Obeng, Nana Adobea:
Ghanaian Popular Music and Socio-Political Commentary:
A Case Study of Barima Sidney.

M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2015. x & 110 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1.82 MB

Oppong, Anna:
The use of English in Ghanaian Highlife Music.
B.A. University of Ghana (Legon), 1979

Reichel, Daniela:
Populäre Musik als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher Veränderungsprozesse.
Highlife und Hiplife in Ghana seit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg.

Magisterarbeit. München: GRIN Verlag, 2008. 129 p.
Inhalt

Rentink, Sonja:
Kpanlogo. Conflict, Identity Crisis and Enjoyment in a Ga Drum Dance.
M.A. University of Amsterdam, 2003. 101 p.
Contents

Rumbolz, Robert Charles:
“A Vessel for Many Things”: Brass Bands in Ghana.
Ph.D. Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.), 2000. 444p.
Contents

Salm, Steven James:
“The Bukom Boys”: Subcultures and Identity Transformation in Accra, Ghana.
Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2003. xiv & 320 p.
ContentsPDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 1 MB

Sunu Doe, E.:
Burger Highlife Music: A Cross- Cultural Phenomenon.
M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2011.

Unruh, Amee Jo:
Kpanlogo: A Detailed Description of One Arrangement of a West-African Music and Dance Genre.
M.M. Bowling Green State University (Bowling Green, Ohio), 2000. 228 p.

Wuaku, Hilarius Mawutor:
A Contextual Study of Brass Band Music within the Peki-Kpando Area of the Volta Region of Ghana.
Ph.D. University Of Ghana, 2015. xiv & 156 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 11.30 MB

Yamusah, Mohammed Sheriff:
A Critical Study of the Music Industry in Tamale.
M.Phil. University of Ghana (Legon), 2013. xi & 154 p.
PDF Download / Télécharger / Baixar 7.41 MB

Page created 01/08/2018 © afrobib.com

  • Boateng, Samuel:
    Popular Music in Ghana:
    Women and the Changing Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality.

    MA thesis. Kent State University, 2016. 119 p.
    ProQuest no. 10169069

    CONTENTS

    List of Figures v
    Acknowledgements vi

    Chapter 1
    Introduction: Statement of Research Problem 1
    A Brief History of Ghanaian Popular Music: From Colonial Brass Bands to
    Post-Independent Highlife Bands 2
    Ghanaian Popular Music: Late 20th Century and Early 21st Century 16

    Chapter 2
    Conceptualizing the Study: Sex, Sexuality, and Gender 22
    Socio-Cultural Implications of Gender in Ghana 23
    Song Text in Ghanaian Popular Music 27
    Signs, Icons, and Symbols 30
    Images of Women Presented by Male Popular Musicians 32

    Chapter 3
    Women’s Roles and Status in Ghanaian Popular Music:
    Cultural, Historical, and Contemporary Perspectives 45
    Feminism, Sexuality and Women’s Bodies 53

    Chapter 4
    Analysis of Selected Songs and Music Videos 64
    Songs About: Motherhood, Social Expectations of Women, and Women’s Roles 65
    Songs About: Romantic Relationships and Women Empowerment (or Authority) 75
    Songs About: Sexuality and Women’s Bodies 84

    Chapter 5
    Conclusion and other Remarks 106

    Appendix and References
    Appendix 108
    Bibliography 109
    Online Sources (Discography; Videos; Other Relevant Websites) 115

  • Brempong, Owusu:
    Akan Highlife in Ghana: Songs of Cultural Transition. Part 1 & 2.
    Ph.D. Indiana University, 1986. 357 & 712 pp.
    ProQuest no. 8617772

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgement i
    Preface iv-v
    Abstract vi-vii
    Table of Contents viii-xvi

    Chapter One
    Fieldwork and the Role of the Native Son
    Fieldwork 1-4
    The Akan and the Bono 4-27
    Highlife Research 27-31
    Insiders and Outsiders 31-41
    Notes 42-50

    Chapter Two
    Religious Background of Ghanaian Society
    Islam and the Akan 55-67
    Christianity and the Akan 67-72
    Notes 73-76

    Chapter Three
    Highlife’s History: A Broad Perspective
    Introduction 77-80
    Highlife, A Syncretic Form 81-85
    Types of Highlife Bands 85-88
    The Formation of the Band 88-92
    Dominant Themes in the Highlife Songs 92-100
    Highlife Function 100-106
    Highlife Comic Opera: The Concert Party 106-113
    Notes 114-117

    Chapter Four
    Forms of Verbal Lore in Highlife Songs
    Comparison of Highlife and Folktale Texts 118-129
    Comparison of Two Types of Performance 129-134
    Other Traditional Narratives in Highlife Performance 134-141
    Proverbs and Proverbial Sayings in Highlife Songs 141-150
    Notes 151-154

    Chapter Five
    Libation in Highlife Songs
    Libation in Highlife Songs 155-160
    Historical Meaning of the Libation 160-169
    Libation in Highlife Songs 169-176
    Devices for Introducing Libation 176-181
    Similarities of Highlife and traditional Libations 181-183
    Differences in Highlife and Traditional Libations 183-184
    Libation as Religious Poetry 184-186
    Notes 187-188

    Chapter Six
    The Concept of God in Highlife Songs
    The Concept of God in the African World 189-192
    The Concept of God in Akan Society 192-212
    Notes 213-214

    Chapter Seven
    The Concept of Witchcraft in Highlife Songs
    The Akan Matrilineal Extended Family 217-220
    The Elders 220-223
    The Chiefs 223-225
    Akan Witchcraft Belief in Highlife 225-233
    Witches as Impediment to Child Bearing 233-237
    Witches as Destroyers of Man’s Destiny 237-245
    Notes 246-248

    Chapter Eight
    Conclusion 249-261
    Notes 262-263

    Bibliography 264-285
    Vita 286

    APPENDICES INDEX

    Appendix A
    Tales in Highlife Songs
    1. Biribi Betumi Yen 288
         Something Can Overcome Us 292
    2. Menya Nkwa A Efiri Wo 296
         Life is from You 299
    3. Aku Sika [Part One] 303
         Golden Aku [Personal game] 305
    4. Aku Sika [Part Two] 308
         Golden Aku [Personal Name] 311
    5. Hini Me 315
         Open the Door for Me 318
    6. Seantie Nye 322
         Disobedience to Not Good 325
    7. Ebi Te Yie 328
         Some Sit Well 330
    8. Asem Mpe Onipa 333
         Trouble Never Likes Men 335
    9. Otan Hunu Are Kwa 338
         Mere Hatred 342
    10. Otwe Mporo 346
         The Antelope Should Not 349
    11. Esre So Oprammire 353
         The Savannah Oprammire [Snake] 355

    Appendix B
    Personal Experience Narratives
    1. Yaw Berko 359
         Yaw Berko [Personal Name] 361
    2. Obi Abayewa 364
         Smeone’s Young Woman 366
    3. Afia Dufie 369
         Afia Dufie [Personal Name] 372
    4. Nsa Yi Mempe 375
         Wine, I Don’t Like It 377
    5. Me Nneema Anko Ehyen Mu 380
         My Things Could Not Go Onto the Ship 382
    6. Onipa Num 384
         Man’s Brother/Sister 386

    Appendix C
    Death as Imagery in the Highlife Song
    1. Julie 389
         Julie [Personal Name] 391
    2. Maame Adjoa 394
         Mother Adjoa [Personal Name] 397
    3. Akwankwaa 400
         Youngster 403
    4. Onipa Awiee 407
         The End of Man 409
    5. Se Wawu Anaa 411
         Is He Dead? 413
    6. Dokoto Kokooko 416
         Doctor Knock, Knock! 418
    7. Agya Bi Wua 420
         When a Father Dies 422
    8. Wontwe Me Nyaa 424
         Draw Me Slowly 426
    9. Obi Nkyen Ye Tena Na 428
         It is Difficult to Stay with Someone 430
    10. Nenko Nefle 432
         His Family 434
    11. Owuo Aye Mebi 436
         Death Has Done Something to Me 438

    Appendix D
    Family, Elders and Witchcraft
    1. Oni Bie 441
         No Helper 443
    2. Mensuro 445
         I Am Not Afriad 447
    3. Ofie Wansena 450
         The House Fly 452
    4. Adwaree Fooee 454
         The Bathroom Became Wet 456
    5. Obi Nka N’asem 458
         One Can’t Tell His Trouble 460
    6. Mmoboraa 462
         Poor Fellow 464
    7. Abusua Nye Asafo 466
         The Family is not Asafo (Band) 468
    8. Aka M’ani 470
         I Am Perplexed 472
    9. Enowaa 474
         Mother 476
    10. Ena Eye A Mane Me 478
         Mother Send Me Something at Times 480
    11. Menko Efie Ho 482
         I Will Not Go to the House 484
    12. Wonni Panin A Due 486
         Pitiful If You Do Not Have an Elder 487
    13. Awie Me Ye 488
         I Am Finished 489

    Appendix 9
    Childbirth, Children and Orphans
    1. Awoo Ye 492
         Childbirth Is Good 494
    2. Obi Anwo Wo A 497
          If You Are Not the Child of Someone 499
    3. Yaa Boahemaa 502
         Yaa Boahemaa [Personal Name] 504
    4. Manka Se Enye Woba Ne Me 506
         Don’t Say that Because I am Not Your Child 508
    5. San Behwe Wo Mma 510
         Come Back to See Your Children 512
    6. Yedabea Mu 514
         Our Sleeping Place 516
    7. Ankonam Mmoboro Agyanka 519
         Lonely Miserable Orphan 521
    8. Obonto 523
         Obonto [Species of fish] 524
    9. Oboafo Ye Na 526
         A Helper is Scarce 528

    Appendix F
    Belief In God and Biblical Ideas
    1. Nyame Wo Pe Nye Ho 531
         God Thy Will Be Done 532
    2. Onyame Ye Kese 535
         God is Great 536
    3. Ma Ye Komm 538
         I Am Quiet 540
    4. Yesu Asenua 542
         The Cross of Jesus 544
    5. Meye Matutu Ha 546
         I Am Almost Moving From Here 549
    6. Me Gye Di Nti 552
         Because of My Faith 554

    Appendix G
    Highlife Songs on Money, Wealth and Poverty
    1. Sika Ye Ohohoo 556
         Money is a Stranger 558
    2. Sika Yi Wonya Bi A Amane 561
         This Money, If You Get Some It Is Trouble 563
    3. Sika Nti 565
         Because of Money 568
    4. Adee Ye Pe Na 571
         Things Are Difficult to Get 573
    5. Onipa Beye Den Ni? 575
         What Should Man Do? 577
    6. Nye Menko 580
         Not I Alone 582
    7. Ebe Ye Yie 584
         It Would Be Alright 586
    8. Enti Na Aye Den 588
         And So What? 590
    9. Adwoa Mansu 593
         Adwoa Don’ t Cry 594
    10. Ma Brabo 595
          My Life in This World 599

    Appendix H
    Destiny and Hatred
     1. Hyebre 602
          Destiny 605
    2. Nkrabea 608
         Destiny 610
    3. Motan me 612
         You Hate Me 614
    4. Otan Hunu Ye Ya 616
         Mere Hatred Is Painful 618
    5. Ma Ne Ntan Woe 620
         Let Him Hate You 623

    Appendix I
    Man and Woman
    1. Aware Te Se Ahwehwe 629
         Marriage is Like a Mirror 631
    2. Asem Sebe 633
         Words in Proverb 635
    3. Odo Bra 637
         Love Come [My lover come] 640
    4. Mede Me Do Ma No A 643
         When I Give My Love to Her 645
    5. Me Dofo Pa 648
         My True Lover [My good lover) 650
    6. Eye A Na Me Mu 0o 652
         I Feel It Deep 655
    7. Odo Ye Wu 659
         Everlasting Lover 661
    8. Me Dofo (Twi Soul) 663
         My Lover 664
    9. Akua Nimo 666
         Akua Nimo [Personal Name] 669
    10. Manya Hu Me Dofo 672
         Once I Have Found My Lover 674
    11. Owo Anidie 677
          She Has Respect 679
    12. Sewaa Akoto 681
          Sewaa Akoto [Personal Name] 683
    13. M’ani Mmere Obi 685
          I Don’t Envy Anyone 687
    14. Yaa Donko 689
          Yaa Donko [Personal Name] 691

    Appendix J
    Musical Transcriptions
    1. Biribi Betumi Yen 693
    2. Yaw Berko 700

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    The Ghanaian Concert Party: African Popular Entertainment at the Cross Roads.
    Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, 1994. 607 p.
    ProQuest no. 9509102

    CONTENTS

    Part One
    The Ghanaian Concert Party and Highlife Music

    Chapter 1
    Introduction to the Concert Party 1-18
    Chapter 2
    The Concert Performance 19-58
    Chapter 3
    Life On The Road 59-90
    Chapter 4
    The Jaguar Jokers Background Story 91-109
    Chapter 5
    The Jaguar Jokerst Band Organisation 109-125
    Chapter 6
    Reflections on the Concert Party Genre by
    some Members of the Jaguar Jokers 126-137
    Chapter 7
    The Jaguar Jokers and the Concert Party
    Profession since the Mid-Seventies 135-150
    Chapter 8
    An Appendix of Concert Party Plays and Magical
    Shows between 1923-1992 151-171
    Chapter 9
    Major Exploratory Themes from Participatory Experience
    in the Ghanaian Popular Entertainment Field 172-188

    Part Two
    African Popular Entertainment at the Cross-Roads

    Chapter 10
    Traditional Continuities: Drama 190-206
    Chapter 11
    Traditional Continuities: Music 207-228
    Chapter 12
    Musical Change and Colonial Contact 229-249
    Chapter 13
    European Progress and Progressive Indigenisation 250-272
    Chapter 14
    The Modern and Traditional:
    Conflicting or Compatible 273-288
    Chapter 15
    Heroes of the Cultural Cross Roads 289-310
    Chapter 16
    The Black Americas and Africa: Pre-War 311-331
    Chapter 17
    The Black Americas and Africa:
    The Second World War and after  32-350
    Chapter 18
    Black Transatlantic Feedback 351-370
    Chapter 19
    City Life 371-398
    Chapter 20
    Class: Social Distance and Status Ranking 399-415
    Chapter 21
    Class: The Articulation or Masking of Class Consciousness 416-437
    Chapter 22
    The Age Gap 438-458
    Chapter 23
    Women on Stage 459-485
    Chapter 24
    Performance and Struggle 486-522

    Coda 523-528
    Footnotes (for Chapters 10 to 24) 529-577
    Bibliography 78-607

  • Darkwa, Asante:
    The New Musical Traditions in Ghana.
    Ph.D. Wesleyan University, 1974. 269 p.
    ProQuest no. 7423020  

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 1

    Chapter 1
    Introduction 1

    Chapter 2
    The Introduction of Euro-American Music to Ghana 12
    The Coming of Europeans to West Africa 12
    Development of European Activities in Ghana Trading 17
    Mission Work and Commercial Enterprise 19
    The Basel Mission 22
    Establishment of Basel Mission Schools 28
    The Methodist Mission 32
    The Educational Development of the Methodist Church 39
    The Bremen Mission 41
    The Bremen Mission’s Educational Activities 43
    The Roman Catholic Missions 45
    Roman Catholic Missions’ Educational Developments 46
    The Anglican Mission 47
    Anglican Schools 48
    Other Missionary Societies and Their Activities 49
    The Castle Schools (1529-1821) 52
    Government Schools (Colonial Schools) 54

    Chapter 3
    Traditional Music and Culture Change in Ghana 60

    Chapter 4
    The New Musical Traditions 97
    Western Music (The Imported Music) 98
    The “New Music” (The New Musical Idioms of Ghanaian Creation) [136]

    Chapter 5
    Instrumental Resources and the Music of the New Groups 164

    Chapter 6
    Summary and Conclusion 200

    Appendix A
    Composers of Art Music (Some Biographical Sketches) 210
    Appendix B
    Ghanaian Art Music (Some Examples) 248
    Appendix C
    List of References 250

  • Kaye, Andrew Laurence:
    Koo Nimo and his Circle: A Ghanaian Musician in Ethnomusicological Perspective.
    Ph.D. Columbia University, 1992. 526 p.
    ProQuest no. 9221168

    CONTENTS

    Introduction
    Questions and research procedures 1

    Chapter 1
    The ethnomusicological setting: The musical heritage of Ghana to the time of Koo Nimo’s childhood 13

    Chapter 2
    Childhood, youth, and formative musical experiences, 1931-1954 65

    Chapter 3
    Defining a career in science, and in music, 1954-1957 93

    Chapter 4
    Family, work, and music, 1957-1966 120

    Chapter 5
    Maturity and recognition, 1966-1978 156

    Chapter 6
    Musical activism and a widening renown, 1979-1990 207

    Chapter 7
    Koo Nimo’s musical repertory in analytic overview 243
    Part I:    Instruments and sonorities 244
    Part II:   Rhythm 266
    Part III:  Harmony 292
    Part IV: Melody 317
    Part V:  Lyrics 342
    Part VI: Performance  421

    Chapter 8
    Conclusion  485

    Bibliography 504
     
    Appendix I
    Koo Nimo’s recordings (a partial listing) 522
    Appendix II
    Films or television programs in which Koo Nimo
    appears (a partial listing) 526

  • Matczynski, William:
    Highlife and its Roots: Negotiating the Social, Cultural, and Musical Continuities Between Popular and Traditional Music in Ghana.
    Macalester College (Saint Paul, Minn,), Music Honors Projects. Paper 10, 2011. 67 p.

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One
    Introduction 1

    Chapter Two
    Musical Continuities between Popular and Traditional Music 19

    Chapter Three
    Highlife Texts 32
    Anansesem, Storytelling and Guitar-Band Highlife

    Chapter Four
    Fusion Music and Experimentalism 46
    Traditional Music as Resource

    Conclusion 55

    Appendix
    Highlife Photographs 57

    Listening List 64
    Bibliography 65

  • Reichel, Daniela:
    Populäre Musik als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher Veränderungsprozesse.
    Highlife und Hiplife in Ghana seit dem Zweiten Weltkrieg.
    Magisterarbeit. München: GRIN Verlag, 2008. 129 p.
    ISBN 978-3-640-39143-1

    INHALT

    1. Einleitung 1
    1.1 Thema und Fragestellung 1
    1.2 Der Aufbau der Arbeit 5
    1.3 Quellenlage 7
    1.4 Eigene Forschung 9
    1.5 Verständnis von Musik und Terminologien 10

    2. Die Entstehung Populärer Musik in Ghana 14
    2.1 Die Entstehung der populären Musik Highlife 15
    2.1.1 Die Entstehung des Brassband-Highlife 17
    2.1.2 Die Entstehung der Palmwine-Gitarren-Bands 19
    2.1.3 Die Entstehung der Tanzkapellen 22
    2.1.4 Die Entwicklungen nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkrieges 24
    2.1.5 Die Krise des Highlife 27
    2.2 Die Entstehung der Populären Musik Hiplife 30
    2.2.1 US-HipHop als Modell für die Internationalisierung 30
    2.2.2 HipHop in Ghana – Hiplife 39
    2.3 Zusammenfassung 50

    3. Populäre Musik als Ausdruck gesellschaftlicher
         Veränderungsprozesse
    53
    3.1 Social commentaries in der ghanaischen Musik 54
    3.2 Social commentaries in der Populären Musik Highlife 58
    3.2.1 Die Entwicklungen bis zur Einführung der indirect 
             rule 1925 59
    3.2.1.1 Die Antikoloniale Einstellung in Highlife-Songs am 
                Beispiel Akpeteshie 60
    3.2.2 Von der indirect rule bis zu Unabhängigkeit 1957 61
    3.2.2.1 Das Nationalgefühl im Highlife 62
    3.2.3 Die Ära Kwame Nkrumah (1957 – 1966) 64
    3.2.3.1 Der politische Stimmungswechsel während der 
                 Nkrumah-Ära im Highlife 66
    3.2.4 Die Zeit der Militärputsche (1966 – 1981) 68
    3.2.4.1 Die politische Instabilität im Highife am Beispiel 
                Nana Kwame Ampadu 70
    3.2.5 Die Ära J.J. Rawlings (1981 – 2000) 73
    3.2.5.1 J.J. Rawlings im Highlife 74
    3.2.6 Modernisierungsprozesse nach dem Ende 
             des 2. Weltkrieges 76
    3.2.6.1 Das Spannungsverhältnis von ,,alter” und ,,neuer” 
                Lebenssituation im Highlife 77
    3.3 Social commentaries in der Populären Musik Hiplife 84
    3.3.1 Die Themen und das Selbstverständnis der 
             Hiplife – Künstler 85
    3.3.2 Der politische Machtwechsel 2001 – von der 
             NDC zur NPP 89
    3.3.2.1 Der politische Machtwechsel 2001 im 
                Hiplife – Freedom of Speech 90
    3.3.3 Politische, ökonomische und soziale Entwicklungen 
             in Ghana unter der NPP-Regierung 94
    3.3.3.1 Die Politik der NPP, soziale Stratifikation und 
               Korruption im Hiplife 96
    3.3.4 Aktuelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen und ihre 
             Auswirkungen in Ghana 100
    3.3.4.1 Aktuelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen und ihre 
               Thematisierung im Hiplife 103
    3.4 Zusammenfassung 113

    4. Resümee 117

    5. Bibliographie 121

  • Rentink, Sonja:
    Kpanlogo. Conflict, Identity Crisis and Enjoyment in a Ga Drum Dance.
    M.A. thesis. University of Amsterdam, 2003. 101 p.

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements 4

    Introduction 5
       Methodology 6
       Technical notes 8

    1 Ga culture 10
    Geographical 10
    Historical 11
    Religion 12
    Social organization 12
       Chieftaincy 12
       Family 13
    Music 13
    Festivals 16

    2 Colonialism: Neo-Traditional Music and Cultural Groups 17
    Colonialism in Ghana 17
       Pre-colonial period 17
       Colonial Period 18
       Post-colonial period 19
    Neo-traditional music? 21
       Traditional music 21
       Popular music 22
       Neo-traditional? 23
    Current developments in Ghanaian traditional music 25
       Cultural groups 25

    3 Kpanlogo 28
    Frankie Laine and Otoo Lincoln 28
    Cultural, social and political context 30
       The creation of kpanlogo 30
       Influence of rock ‘n roll 30
       Conflicts 31
       Political situation 32
       Spread around the world 33
    Traditional background 34
       Gome 34
       Kolomashie 37
       Oge 38
       Highlife 39

    4 Musical aspects 43
    The ensemble and the instruments 43
       The ensemble 43
       The instruments, organology 43
    The musical structure 45
    The songs 48
       Mo mibi le ohami 48
       Mo ble mi oho mie 49
       Alonte juloni 50
       Jelenbi 50
       ABC 52
       Everybody bring your calabash 53
       Daadaa Buko 54
    The dance 57
       Some typical kpanlogo movements 60
    Performance practice 63

    Summary 66

    Conclusions 67

    Bibliography 68
    Appendix 71
    List of collected material 95

  • Rumbolz, Robert Charles:
    “A Vessel for Many Things”: Brass Bands in Ghana.
    Wesleyan University (Middletown, Conn.), 2000. 444p.
    ProQuest no. 3005648

    CONTENTS

    Acknowledgements viii
    Illustrations x
    Technical Notes xi
       Geographic xi
       Linguistic xii
       Currency xii
    Musical Transcriptions xii

    Prologue: Rebirth at Kwanyako xiv

    Introduction 1
       Methodology 3
       Organization of the Dissertation 5

    Part I

    1 Foundations of Thought 9
    Terms of Culture Contact 9
       Ethnomusicology and the Terms of Culture Contact 16
    Research on West African Music 22
       “A Novel Object” – A.M. Jones and the Rhythm Fetish 25
       Influence of Technology 27
       Role of the Indigenous Scholar 29
       Anthropology and African Musicology 30
    Foundations of West African Music 35

    2 Brass Bands as Power Symbol 40
    Military Music in Europe 40
       A Brief History of Brass Bands in Britain 41
       Missionary Zeal and the Brass Bands 43
    A Brief History of European Presence in Ghana 45
    The Missionary Presence in the Gold Coast 49
       Evangelism and Band Proliferation: The Case of Kyebi 52
    Early Military Music in the Gold Coast 53
       Other External Influences 56
    Musical Responses to Culture Change 57
       Palm-wine 58
       Adaha and Other Band Styles 60
       Neo-Traditional Styles 64
    British Response to Native Bands 64
    World War I and the Bands 68
    In Summary 71

    3 Mass Education and National Culture 72
    Cocoa Boom 72
    World War II 74
    Mass Education 75
    Independence  78
    In Summary 80

    Part II

    4 Band Types and Social Formations 83
    The Bands 83
       Church Bands 84
       Village and Town Bands 88
       Security Forces and Service Bands 88
       School Bands 91
       Virtual Bands 92
    Professionalism 92
    Instruments: Ownership and Quality 95
    Access to Instruments 98
    Extra-musical Concerns 100
       Brass, the Body, and Gender 100
    In Summary 102

    5 Musical Particulars 105
    Training 105
       Rehearsing 106
       Music Literacy 107
       Tone and Tuning 111
       Rhythm 117
        “Encomium”: The Fine Art of Improvisation 126
       Leadership 128
       Akan Evaluative Terms 129
    In Summary 131

    6 Performance Dynamics 134
    Venue and Repertoire 134
       Competition 137
    Dress 141
    Movement and Proxemics 145
       Dance 145
       Playing Posture 147
    Reception 148
    Performances Observed 150
       Funeral 150
       Sporting Events 152
       Easter Picnic 155
       National Holidays 157
    In Summary 161

    7 Current Trends in Brass Band Performance 163
       Amplification 163
       Transnationalism 165
       Re-Contextualization 166

    Conclusion 171

    Appendix I: Bands in Study 175
    Appendix II: Notes on Sound Examples 177
    Appendix III: Transcriptions 180
    Appendix IV: Paschal Yao Younge 188
    Appendix V: Presbyterian Brass Band Guild Survey 196
    Appendix VI: King’s Day Celebration Program 202

    Glossary 204

    Bibliography 209
       Interviews 209 
       Works Cited 212

  • Salm, Steven James:
    “The Bukom Boys”:
    Subcultures and Identity Transformation in Accra, Ghana.
    Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2003. xiv & 320 p.
    ProQuest no. 3118070

    CONTENTS

    Chapter One
    Constructs in the History of Subcultural Youth 1
    Locating Youth: What Are Youth Subcultures? 5
    Youth and Youth Subcultures as a Topic of Scholarly Enquiry 13
    Popular Culture, Urban History, and Subcultural Representation 20

    Chapter Two
    “All Roads Lead to Accra”:
     Changing Worldviews among Urbanites 40
    The Changing Face of Accra in the Early Colonial
    Era, 1877-1918 44
    Becoming a “Colonial” City: The Struggle for Cultural
    Space, 1918-1939 48
    The Second World War and Its Aftermath 60
    Globalizing Influences during the Second World War 71
    Conclusion 80

    Chapter Three
    Crisis and Isolation: The “Invention of Youth” 83
    Population and Immigration in the Post-War Era 85
    Urban Social Problems: Housing, Economics, and
    Unemployment 92
    Social Protest 104
    Education and (Un)Employment 109
    The Problem of the School Leavers 116
    Conclusion 123

    Chapter Four
    Cultural Images and Icons: Technological Changes
    and Youth Cultural Expressions in the 1950s 127
    Media and Technology 128
    Hanging around the Cinema 144
    The Changing Cultural Scene: Class and Generational
    Divides in Popular Culture Expression 151
    Changing Modes of Dress: Zoot Suits and Youth Identity 153
    Entertainment and Nightlife in the 1950s: Elite Culture 160
    “Mainstream” Urban Culture 164
    Underclass Youth and Accra Nightlife 169
    Americanization and “Scrap Band Mania” 175
    Conclusion 183

    Chapter Five
    “Rain or Shine We Gonna’ Rock!” 187
    Subcultural Formation 190
    New Diversions 203
    Public Expressions of Rock ‘n’ Roll Culture 208
    Localizing Dance Styles: Class and Generational Conflict 217
    Mainstream Twisting 226
    Soul to Soul 230
    Conclusion: Shifting Identities in Youth Subcultural
    Expressions 232

    Chapter Six
    Modernizing Traditions: “My Own Form of Highlife” 239
    The Origins and Spread of Kpanlogo 244
    Underclass Youth as Cultural Brokers 253
    The Struggle for Control of Popular Expression 263
    Transforming Identities and Creating Opportunities 271
    Conclusion: Modernizing Tradition 276

    Chapter Seven
    Conclusion: The Transformation of Youth 279
    The Invention of Youth: The Second World War and the
    Roots of a Youth Class 280
    The Search for Meaning: New Cultural Expressions in
    the 1950s 282
    Transformed Identities: Subcultural Expressions in the
    Early Independence Era 284
    Continuity and Change in Youth Expressions 287
    Accra Subcultures: A Quest for Modernity 291

    Bibliography 293
    Vita 320

  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    CONTENTS

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  • Johnson, John William:
    ‘Heelloy’. Modern Poetry and Songs of the Somalis.
    London: HAAN Publishing, 1998. xxiii & 241 p.
    ISBN 978-1-874-20981-2

    CONTENTS

    Foreword to the first edition by B. W. Andrzejewski ix
    Foreword to the 1996 edition by Abdilahi Qarshi xi
    Preface to the first edition xv
    Preface to the 1996 edition xxiii

    1. Introduction
    The social context 1
    The Nature of Traditional Pastoralist Poetry 12
    The Historical Development of Modern Oral Poetry 17

    2. The Family of Miniature Genres
    The Nature of the Family of Miniature Genres 27
    The Poetry of the Miniature Family 32

    3. The emergence of the Belwo
    The Historical Background 49
    The Belwo is Born 53
    The Poetry of the Belwo 59

    4. The Heello: Period One
    The Metamorphosis: Belwo to Heello A 75
    The Modem Poem: Heello A to Heello B 82

    5. The Heello: Period Two
    The Historical Background 95
    The Poetry of the Second Period 103

    6. The Heello: Period Three
    The Historical Background 117
    The Poetry of the Third Period 146

    7. Characteristics of the Heello: All Periods
    Themes Common to All Periods 175
    Structural Characteristics and
    Development Common to All Periods 190
    The Impact of Media on Modern Poetry 208

    8. Conclusion
    The Inheritance of the Heello 215
    Forces Behind the Success and Development of Modern Poetry 216

  • Collins, [Edmund] John:
    Fela. Kalakuta Notes. 2nd edition
    Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2015.  xii & 326 p.
    ISBN 978-0-8195-7539-5 (paper) 978-0-8195-7540-1 (ebook)

    CONTENTS

    Foreword by Banning Eyre ix
    Introduction 1

    Part 1 Early Days
    1 The Birth of Afrobeat 27
    2 Joe Mensah Remembers 41
    3 Fela in Ghana 49
    4 Stan Plange Remembers 29

    Part 2 Confrontation
    5 Kalakuta is Born 67
    6 “JB” Talks about Fela 73
    7 The Kalakuta Republic 81
    8 The Black President 114
    9 Amsterdam and After 125

    Part 3 Retrospect
    10 Mac Tontoh on Fela 139
    11 Frank Talk about Fela 152
    12 Obiba Plays It Again 165
    13 Smart Binete Sorts It Out 174
    14 Anku Checks Out the Beat 178
    15 Nana Danso Orchestrates 183
    16 Some Early Afro-Fusion Pioneers 197
    17 Interview with Fela 204
    18 Afterthoughts and Updates 209
    19. Felabrations at Home and Abroad 238

    Chronology 259
    Notes 269
    Selected Bibliography 281
    Discography 285
    Appendix A: “Shuffering and Shmiling” Score 303
    Index 309

  • Erlmann, Veit (ed.):
    Populäre Musik in Afrika.

    Veröffentlichungen des Museum für Völkerkunde.
    Neue Folge 53. Abteilung Musikethnologie VIII.
    Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde, 1991. 312 pp. & 2 CDs.
    ISBN 3-88609-213-5

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  • Mortaigne, Veronique:
    Cesaria Evora. La voix du Cap-Vert.
    Arles: Actes Sud, 1997. 203 p.

    ISBN 2-7427-1152-X 

    afropop1995

    ÍNDICE

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  • Sweeney, Philip:
    Directory of World Music. A Guide to Performers and their Music.
    With Contributions from Peter Gabriel, Andy Kershaw, Giberto Gil [&] Manu Dibango.
    London: Virgin Books, 1991. 262 p.
    Section Africa 1-81
    ISBN 0-86369-378-4

    sweeney1991CONTENTS

    AFRICA

    The North and West
    Introduction: Peter Gabriel 1
    Libya 3
    Tunisia 5
    Algeria 6
    Morocco 13
    Mauritania 16
    Senegal 17
    Mali 20
    Guinea 26
    Guinea-Bissau 29
    Cape Verde 29
    Sierra Leone 31
    Côte d’Ivoire 32
    Ghana 34
    Togo and Benin 36
    Nigeria 37

    Central Africa, The South and East
    Introduction: Manu Dibango 42
    Cameroon 44
    Zaire 49
    Congo 56
    Gabon 56
    Angola 57
    Zambia 58
    Mozambique 59
    Zimbabwe 60
    South Africa 65
    Madagascar 70
    Mauritius and Reunion 71
    Tanzania and Zanzibar 72
    Kenya 74
    Uganda 76
    Burundi 76
    Ethiopia 77
    Sudan 79

  • Lee, Hélène:
    Rockers d’Afrique. Stars et légendes du rock mandinque.
    Paris: Albin Michel, 1988. 223 pp.
    ISBN 2-226-03 139-1 

    TABLE DE MATIÈRESafropop1995

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